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Book
xiv, 236 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • List of illustrations Acknowledgements Introduction: Ladders and Snakes Meritocracy as plutocracy What's wrong with meritocracy? Five problems Meritocracy as social system and as ideological discourse How this book is organised Part one: Genealogies Chapter one: Meritocracy's genealogies in social theory Never start with the dictionary Early genealogies, histories and geographies Ladders and level playing field Socialist roots and critique Social democratic meritocracy The critique of educational essentialism 'Just' meritocracy? The beginnings of neoliberal meritocracy Meritocracy in the neoliberal meritocracy Chapter two: 'Rising up': gender, ethnicity, class and the meritocratic deficit See where your talent takes you Partial progression and painful ladders: mid century welfare Pulling rank: problems with welfarist 'rising up' Selling 1968 Parables of progress: luminous media fables Not so cool: unequal employment Selling inequality: post-feminism, post-race...post-class? Neoliberal justice narratives The egalitarian and the meritocratic deficit Chapter three: The movement of meritocracy in political rhetoric Meritocratic feeling Thatcherism in Britain Major meritocracy Blairism and beyond Aspiration Nation Tragi-comedy: Bojo's 'hard work' Blue-collar billionaires: Farage, Trump and the destabilisation of merit Theresa May and the Middle England meritocrats Aspiration for all? Meritocracy vs. mutuality Part two: Popular parables Chapter four: Just like us? Normcore plutocrats and the popularisation of elitism Meritocracy and the extension of privilege The 1%, the new rentiers and transnational asset-stripping Normcore plutocrats Normcore aristocrats The kind parent Luxury-flaunters The new rich are different Chapter five: #Damonsplaining and the unbearable whiteness of 'merit' #Damonsplaining and externalised white male privilege Post-racial meritocracy The racialization of merit: people The racialization of merit: products The racialization of merit: production Trying to shut women up Calling out the myth of postracial meritocracy Externalised and internalised neoliberal meritocracy Chapter six: Desperate success: Managing the mumpreneur Doing it all Child labour Desperate success Entrepreneurial Man Magical femininity The mumpreneur and the branded self Disaggregation and alternatives Conclusion: Beyond neoliberal meritocracy Failing to convince The journeys of meritocracy What's the alternative? Changing the cultural pull of meritocratic hope Alternatives to the ladder Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138889552 20171009
Meritocracy today involves the idea that whatever your social position at birth, society ought to offer enough opportunity and mobility for 'talent' to combine with 'effort' in order to 'rise to the top'. This idea is one of the prevalent social and cultural tropes of our time, as palpable in the speeches of politicians as in popular culture. In this book Jo Littler argues that meritocracy is the key cultural means of legitimation for contemporary neoliberal culture -- and that whilst it promises opportunity, it in fact creates new forms of social division. Against Meritocracy is split into two parts. Part I explores the genealogies of meritocracy within social theory, political discourse and working cultures. It traces the dramatic U-turn in meritocracy's meaning, from socialist slur to a contemporary ideal of how a society should be organised. Part II uses a series of case studies to analyse the cultural pull of popular 'parables of progress', from reality TV to the super-rich and celebrity CEOs, from social media controversies to the rise of the 'mumpreneur'. Paying special attention to the role of gender, 'race' and class, this book provides new conceptualisations of the meaning of meritocracy in contemporary culture and society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138889552 20171009
Green Library
Book
1 online resource () : color illustrations.
Book
xii, 116 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • List of illustrations Acknowledgements Chapter 1: Introducing the book 1.1 Reflecting on the current debate 1.2 The contribution and the limitations of this book 1.3 Outline Chapter 2: Causes of urban-economic inequality and segregation 2.1 Macro processes and inequality 2.2 Inequality between cities 2.3 Growing inequalities in cities 2.4 Economic segregation in cities Chapter 3: Reflecting on the measurement 3.1 How to measure inequality? 3.1.1 The Gini coefficient 3.1.2 Limits to the scope 3.2 How to measure segregation? 3.2.1 The dissimilarity index 3.2.2 Sensitivity to measurement choices 3.2.3 Limits to the scope 3.3 Inequality and segregation of what? 3.3.1 Wage, income or capital 3.3.2 From gross incomes to standard of living 3.4 A dynamic perspective on inequality and segregation Chapter 4: Reflecting on the (negative) societal impact 4.1 The negative impact of economic inequality 4.1.1 Effects on economic growth 4.1.2 Health and social effects 4.2 The negative impact of economic segregation 4.2.1 Mechanisms underlying neighbourhood effects 4.2.2 Identification of neighbourhood effects 4.2.3 From individual effects to city level effects Chapter 5: Reflecting on the moral implications 5.1 Equality and distributional justice 5.2 The pie metaphor 5.3 Good and bad economic inequality 5.4 The impracticability of aiming for economic equality 5.5 The same or enough? About the moral relevance of economic inequality 5.6 The moral relevance of (economic) segregation 5.7 Reflecting on the material dimension of economic inequality and segregation Chapter 6: Reflecting on urban policy 6.1 Summary of the book 6.2 Redistribution of money 6.3 Redistribution of people List of key concepts and definitions Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138283992 20171211
Increasing economic inequality in cities, and the spatial translation of that into more segregated neighbourhoods, is top of the political agenda in developed countries. While the overall living standards have increased in the last century, the focus has now shifted from poverty to economic differences, with a particular focus on the gap between the very poor and the (ultra-)rich. The authors observe a common view among policy-makers and researchers alike: that urban-economic inequality and segregation are increasing; that this increase is bad; and that money and people (in the case of segregation) need to be redistributed in response. In six compact chapters, this book enriches and broadens the debate. Chapters bring together the literature on the social effects of economic inequality and segregation and question whether there are sizable effects and what their direction (positive or negative) is. The often conflated concepts of economic inequality (and segregation) and social injustice is disentangled and the moral implications are reflected on. The book is essential reading for students and academics of Planning Theory, Planning Ethics, Urban Geography, Urban Economics, Economic Geography and Urban Sociology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138283992 20171211
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (xix, 227 pages) : maps, illustrations.
  • Few safe harbors : Peter Douglas's formative years
  • California's coast : its origins and pre-commission development
  • Sea change : California's environmental surge
  • Coastal conservation, politics, and a new commission
  • High tide : the executive director years
  • Ebb tide : the receding years
  • Footprints in sand : Peter Douglas's legacy
  • Appendix A : a selected time line, California coastal conservation and Peter Douglas
  • Appendix B : a selected list of Peter Douglas's accomplishments and honors.
There are moments when we forget how fortunate we are to have the California coast. The state is home to 1,100 miles of uninterrupted coastline defined by long stretches of beach and jagged rocky cliffs. Coastal Sage chronicles the career and accomplishments of Peter Douglas, the longest-serving executive director of the California Coastal Commission. For nearly three decades, Douglas fought to keep the California coast public, prevent overdevelopment, and safeguard habitat. In doing so, Douglas emerged as a leading figure in the contemporary American environmental movement and influenced public conservation efforts across the country. He coauthored California's foundational laws pertaining to shoreline management and conservation: Proposition 20 and the California Coastal Act. Many of the political battles to save the coast from overdevelopment and secure public access are revealed for the first time in this study of the leader who was at once a visionary, warrior, and coastal sage.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520296657 20171227
Book
xix, 227 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm
  • Few safe harbors : Peter M. Douglas's formative years
  • California's coast : its origins and pre-commission development
  • Sea change : California's environmental surge
  • Coastal conservation, politics, and a new commission
  • High tide : the executive director years
  • Ebb tide : the receding years
  • Footprints in sand : Peter Douglas's legacy
  • Appendix A : a selected time line, California coastal conservation and Peter Douglas
  • Appendix B : a selected list of Peter Douglas's accomplishments and honors.
"There are moments when we forget how fortunate we are to have the California coast. The state is home to 1,100 miles of uninterrupted coastline defined by long stretches of beach and jagged rocky cliffs. Coastal Sage chronicles the career and accomplishments of Peter Douglas, the longest-serving executive director of the California Coastal Commission. For nearly three decades, Douglas fought to keep the California coast public, prevent overdevelopment, and safeguard habitat. In doing so, Douglas emerged as a leading figure in the contemporary American environmental movement and influenced public conservation efforts across the country. He coauthored California's foundational laws pertaining to shoreline management and conservation: Proposition 20 and the California Coastal Act. Many of the political battles to save the coast from overdevelopment and secure public access are revealed for the first time in this study of the leader who was at once a visionary, warrior, and coastal sage."--Provided by publisher.
Green Library

6. Data and the city [2018]

Book
xix, 229 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of Figures List of Tables List of Contributors Chapter 1 Data and the City by Rob Kitchin, Tracey P. Lauriault and Gavin McArdle Part I: Data-Driven Cities Chapter 2 A city is not a galaxy: Understanding the city through urban data by Martijn de Waal Chapter 3 Data about cities: Redefining big, recasting small by Michael Batty Chapter 4 Data-driven urbanism by Rob Kitchin Part II: Urban Data Chapter 5 Crime data and analytics: Accounting for crime in the city by Teresa Scassa Chapter 6 Data provenance and possibility: thoughts towards a provenance schema for urban data by Jim Thatcher and Craig Dalton Chapter 7 Following data threads by James Merrick White Chapter 8 Sticky data - context and friction in the use of urban data proxies by Dietmar Offenhuber Part III: Urban Data Technologies Chapter 9 Urban data and city dashboards: Six key issues by Rob Kitchin and Gavin McArdle Chapter 10 Sharing and analysing data in smart cities by Pouria Amirian and Anahid Basiri Chapter 11 Blockchain City: Economic, social and cognitive ledgers by Chris Speed, Deborah Maxwell and Larissa Pschetz Chapter 12 Situating data infrastructures by Till Straube Chapter 13 Ontologizing the City by Tracey P. Lauriault Part IV: Urban Data Cultures and Power Chapter 14 Data cultures, power and the city by Jo Bates Chapter 15 Where are data citizens? by Evelyn Ruppert Chapter 16 Beyond quantification: a role for citizen science and community science in a smart city by Mordechai (Muki) Haklay Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138222632 20171201
There is a long history of governments, businesses, science and citizens producing and utilising data in order to monitor, regulate, profit from, and make sense of the urban world. Recently, we have entered the age of big data, and now many aspects of everyday urban life are being captured as data and city management mediated through data-driven technologies. Data and the City is the first edited collection to provide an interdisciplinary analysis of how we come to know and govern cities and the implications of such a transformation. This book looks at the creation of real-time cities and data-driven urbanism and considers the relationships at play. By taking a philosophical, political, practical and technical approach to urban data, the authors analyse the ways in which data is produced and framed within socio-technical systems. They then examine the constellation of existing and emerging urban data technologies. The volume concludes by considering the social and political ramification of data-driven urbanism, questioning whom it serves and for what ends. This book, the companion volume to 2016's Code and the City, offers the first critical reflection on the relationship between data, data practices and the city, and how we come to know and understand cities through data. It will be crucial reading for those who wish to understand and conceptualize urban big data, data-driven urbanism, and the development of smart cities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138222632 20171201
Green Library
Book
xx, 303 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • 1.Introduction. Defining the Urban: Why Do We Need Definitions? Part I: Academic Disciplines 2. Sociology: The Sociological "Urban" 3.Geography: Rethinking the "Urban" and Urbanization 4. Anthropology: The Death and Rebirth of Urban Anthropology 5.History: Understanding "Urban" from the Disciplinary Viewpoint of History 6.Economics 7.Ecology: Science and Ethics 8.Environmental Psychology: Views of the "Urban" from Environmental Psychology Part II: Professional Practices 9.Public Policy: Looking for the "Urban" in Public Policy 10.Architecture and Urban Design: Leaving Behind the Notion of the City 11.Civil Engineering: Unlocking the Potential of Future Cities through Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure 12.Urban Planning 13.Urban Governance: Transcending Conventional Urban Governance 14.Social Work: Social Work Intersections with Urbanism 15.Public Health: Urban Health: History, Definitions, and Approaches 16.Law: The Concept of "Urban" in Law Part III: Emerging Approaches 17.Geospatial Techniques 18.Urban Political Ecology: Landscapes of Power 19.Urban Metabolism: Conceptualizing the City as an Organism 20.Transition Theories 21.Complexity Science: The Urban is a Complex Adaptive System 22.Science Fiction: The Urban in Posthuman Science Fiction Synthesis 23.Defining the Urban: A Quixotic Pursuit.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472449528 20171121
What is "urban"? How can it be described and contextualised? How is it used in theory and practice? Urban processes feature in key international policy and practice discourses. They are at the core of research agendas across traditional academic disciplines and emerging interdisciplinary fields. However, the concept of "the urban" remains highly contested, both as material reality and imaginary construct. The urban remains imprecisely defined. Defining the Urban is an indispensable guide for the urban transdisciplinary thinker and practitioner. Parts I and II focus on how "Academic Disciplines" and "Professional Practices, " respectively, understand and engage with the urban. Included, among others, are Architecture, Ecology, Governance and Sociology. Part III, "Emerging Approaches, " outlines how elements from theory and practice combine to form transdisciplinary tools and perspectives. Written by eminent experts in their respective fields, Defining the Urban provides a stepping stone for the development of a common language-a shared ontology-in the disjointed fields of urban research and practice. It is a comprehensive and accessible resource for anyone with an interest in understanding how urban scholars and practitioners can work together on this complex theme.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472449528 20171121
Green Library
Book
ix, 213 pages ; 23 cm
Green Library
Book
xvii, 359 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm
  • The early modern Jewish ghetto
  • Ghetto : etymology, original definition, reality, and diffusion / Benjamin Ravid
  • The end to confessionalism : Jews, law, and the Roman ghetto / Kenneth Stow
  • The early modern ghetto : a study in urban real estate / Bernard Cooperman
  • Venice : a culture of enclosure, a culture of control : the creation of the ghetto in the context of early cinquecento city / Samuel D. Gruber
  • Nazi ghettos
  • "There was no work, we only worked for the Germans" : ghettos and ghetto labor in German-occupied soviet territories / Anika Walke
  • Hunger in the ghettos / Helene J. Sinnreich
  • "Am I my brother's keeper?" : Jewish committees in the ghettos of the Mogilev district and the Romanian authorities in Transnistria, 1941 to 1944 / Gali Mir-Tibon
  • Jewish resistance in ghettos in the former Soviet Union during the holocaust / Zvi Gitelman and Lenore J. Weitzman
  • When (and why) is a ghetto not a "ghetto"? : concentrating and segregating Jews in Budapest, 1944 / Tim Cole
  • U.S. and African American ghettos
  • Shifting "ghettos" : established jews, jewish immigrants, and african-americans in chicago 1880-1960 / Tobias Brinkman
  • "Is a Negro district, in the midst of our fairest cities, to become connotative of the ghetto"? : using corpus analysis to trace the "ghetto" in the black press, 1900-1930 / Avigail S. Oren
  • Constrained but not contained : patterns of everyday life and the limits of segregation in 1920s Harlem / Stephen Robertson
  • The American ghetto as an international human rights crisis : the fight against racial restrictive covenants, 1945-1948 / Jeffrey D. Gonda
  • Unmaking the ghetto : community development and persistent social inequality in Brooklyn, Los Angeles, and Philadelphia / Brian Purnell
  • Urban locations, apartheid, and the ghetto in Southern Africa
  • "Their world was a ghetto" : space, power and identity in Alexandra, South Africa's squatters' movement, 1946-47 / Dawne Y. Curry
  • Citizens, not subjects : spatial segregation and the making of Durban's African working class / Alex lichtenstein
  • Location culture in South Africa / Gavin Steingo.
Green Library
Book
xxix, 481 pages : illustrations, maps ; 26 cm.
Green Library
Book
ix, 179 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color), map ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: Why Does 111 1st Street Matter? Chapter 1: The Lorillard Legacy Chapter 2: Crossing the Hudson Chapter 3: The Spaces in Between Chapter 4: Who Owns a Space? Chapter 5: When a Dream Dies Chapter 6: One Last Fight: Historical Preservation & 111 1st Street Chapter 7: What Might be Learned Conclusion: Some Years Later Epilogue: The 111 1st Street Exodus: Where Are They Now? Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780823278039 20171204
David J. Goodwin is an urban historian and historic preservation advocate and currently a librarian at Fordham University where he received his MA in Urban Studies. A resident of Jersey City, Goodwin has served as a member and chairman of the Jersey City Historic Preservation Commission and he is a current board member of the Jersey City Landmarks Conservancy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780823278022 20171204
In the late 1980s, a handful of artists priced out of Manhattan and desperately needing affordable studio space discovered 111 1st Street, a former P. Lorillard Tobacco Company warehouse. Over the next two decades, an eclectic collection of painters, sculptors, musicians, photographers, filmmakers, and writers dreamt and toiled within the building's labyrinthine halls. The local arts scene flourished, igniting hope that Jersey City would emerge as the next grassroots center of the art world. However, a rising real estate market coupled with a provincial political establishment threatened the community at 111 1st Street. The artists found themselves entangled in a long, complicated, and vicious fight for their place in the building and for the physical survival of 111 1st Street itself, a site that held so much potential, so much promise for Jersey City. Left Bank of the Hudson offers a window into the demographic, political, and socio-economic changes experienced by Jersey City during the last thirty years. Documenting the narrative of 111 1st Street as an act of cultural preservation, author David J. Goodwin's well-researched and significant contribution addresses the question of the role of artists in economically improving cities. As a Jersey City resident, Goodwin applies his knowledge of the city's rich history of political malfeasance and corruption, including how auspicious plans for a waterfront arts enclave were repeatedly bungled by a provincial-minded city administration. In writing this story, Goodwin interviewed thirteen artists and residents, two businesses, three government officials, and five non-profits, civic organizations, and community activists. The book chronologically explores the history and business of the P. Lorillard Tobacco Company, its evolution into a bustling arts community, the battle to preserve the warehouse as a historic structure, and the lessons to be drawn from the loss and ultimate demolition of the building in 2007, as well as the present state of the neighborhood. Setting the facts straight for future generations, Left Bank of the Hudson provides an illustrative lesson to government officials, scholars, students, activists, and everyday citizens attempting to navigate the "rediscovery" of American cities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780823278039 20171204
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
456 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), color maps ; 24 cm
  • Race and social construction of difference
  • The shaping of a nation : constructing race in america
  • The social construction and regulation of families
  • Work and wealth inequality
  • Health and healthcare
  • Education
  • Crime, law and deviance
  • Power, politics, and identities
  • Sports and the American dream
  • Military, war, and terrorism
  • References.
Green Library
Book
287 p. ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 146 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction Simonetta Armondi and Stefano Di Vita 1. Which Milan? Setting the scene for reflecting urban decline, resilience, and change Simonetta Armondi and Stefano Di Vita 2. Urban regionalization and metropolitan resurgence: discontinuity and persistence of a spatial dialectic Matteo Bolocan Goldstein 3. The attractiveness of Milan and the spatial patterns of international firms Ilaria Mariotti 4. Creative production and urban regeneration in Milan Antonella Bruzzese 5. Sharing economy: makerspaces, co-working spaces, hybrid workplaces, and new social practices Carolina Pacchi 6. Forms of urban change. Nodes of knowledge-based networks as drivers of new metropolitan patterns in Southern Milan Corinna Morandi and Mario Paris 7. Urban change and geographies of production in North East Milan Simonetta Armondi 8. Urban change and innovation of functions and productions in the north-western transect of the Milan urban region Stefano Di Vita 9. Territorial infrastructures and new production places Andrea Rolando 10. The last cycle of Milan urban policies and the prospects for a new urban agenda Gabriele Pasqui.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138244795 20171227
As a main urban centre of one of the most dynamic European regions, Milan is a key location from which to study narratives of innovations and contemporary productions - old and new manufacturing, tertiary and consumptive sectors, creative and cultural economy - and investigate their influence both on spatial patterns and urban policy agenda. Accordingly, this book explores the contentious geographies of innovation, productions and working spaces, both empirically and theoretically in a city that, since the beginning of the 2000s, has been involved in a process of urban change, with relevant spatial and socio-economic effects, within an increasingly turbulent world economy. Through this analysis, the book provides an insight into the complexity of contemporary urban phenomena beyond a traditional metropolitan lens, highlighting issues such as rescaling, urban decentralization and recentralization, extensive urban transformation and shrinkage and molecular urban regeneration. This book is a valuable resource for academics, researchers and scholars focussing on Urban Studies such as Urban Policy, Urban Planning, Urban Geography, Urban Economy, and Urban Sociology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138244795 20171227
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiii, 243 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • Preface Chapter 1: Something about Ethnicity Chapter 2: Diversity in Urban History Chapter 3: Contextualizing Ethnicity Chapter 4: Fashioning Spatial Concentration Chapter 5: Measuring and Modeling Spatial Segregation Chapter 6: Ethnic Culture Regions and Placemaking Chapter 7: Ethnic Spaces Created from Exploitation and Conflict Chapter 8: Positive Consequences of Concentration Chapter 9: Negative Consequences of Concentration Chapter 10: Multiculturalism and the Spatial Configuration of Ethnic Groups in the City Chapter 11: Distances and Diasporas Chapter 12: Transnationalism and Hybridity Chapter 13: Envisioning the Future References Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781538101896 20171002
This important book provides a novel perspective on ethnicity, nationality, and race by considering how they are shaped by their geography. Exploring the complicated terrain of ethnicity through an expansive global perspective, David H. Kaplan traces the spatial arrangements that convey such potent meaning to the identity and opportunities of members of any cultural group. With examples from around the world, the author considers the most important aspects of ethnicity-from segregation to place making to multiculturalism, culture regions, diasporas, and transnationalism. He frames ethnicity as a contingent phenomenon, showing how context and place determine the position, definitions, behaviors, and attitudes toward and by members of an ethnic group. Drawing on an impressive depth of historical and empirical detail, Kaplan's analysis of the critical role of ethnicity in everyday geographies makes a major contribution to the field.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781538101896 20171002
Green Library
Book
xii, 234 pages : illustrations, maps ; 22 cm
  • 1. Introduction.- 2. Planning for Growth & Decline in America: A Concise History Chapter.-3. Theories of Smart Shrinkage & Smart Growth Chapter.- 4. How Much Change Is Too Much - a Look at the Numbers.- 5. The Legacy of Change: Depopulation and Growth's Impact on New Bedford Today Chapter.- 6. After the Hurricane: Government Responses to Employment and Population Change, 1929-1975 Chapter.- 7. Coming to Terms with Change: Contemporary Policy Responses.- 8.Urban Absorption Chapter.- 9. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319607047 20171002
This book paints an intimate portrait of an overlooked kind of city that neither grows nor declines drastically. In fact, New Bedford, Massachusetts represents an entire category of cities that escape mainstream urban studies' more customary attention to global cities (New York), booming cities (Atlanta), and shrinking cities (Flint). New Bedford-style ordinary cities are none of these, they neither grow nor decline drastically, but in their inconspicuousness, they account for a vast majority of all cities. Given the complexities of growth and decline, both temporarily and spatially, how does a city manage change and physically adapt to growth and decline? This book offers an answer through a detailed analysis of the politics, environment, planning strategies, and history of New Bedford.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319607047 20171002
Green Library
Book
xi, 221 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: Strange Zones/ Part 1: Political Anatomies Of Bodies And Cities/ 1 Darwin's Monsters/ 2 Metropolitan Others/ 3 Science & The Architectural Imaginary/ 4 Posthuman Urbanism/Part 2: Monsters In The Metropolis/ 5 Parasites & Scavengers/ 6 Junkspace & Pirate Utopias/ 7 New Psychogeographies / Conclusion: Towards a Posthuman Cartography of Urban Space.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781783480807 20171218
Posthuman Urbanism explores what it means to live in an urban environment with reference to posthuman theory. The book argues that contemporary science and technology offers radically different ways for changing the way we live in city spaces today. It will be of interest to students and academics in Cultural Studies, Urban Studies, Critical Geography, Science and Technology Studies, Sociology, Architecture and Anthropology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781783480807 20171218
Green Library
Book
1 online resource.
  • Introduction Svetlana Hristova and Mariusz Czepczynski Part I. Concepts and Discourses: The Resilient Public Space 01. Re-Imagining Civil Society: Conflict and Control in the City's Public Spaces Sharon Zukin 02. Public Space in a Global World: After the Spectacle Svetlana Hristova 03. Seeing the Local in Global Cities Jerome Krase Part II. Contestations and Rights: Public and Civic 04. Civic Landscapes of Post-Socialist Cities: Urban Movements and the Recover of Public Spaces Mariusz Czepczynski 05. Public Space, Memory and Protest during Post-Socialist Transformation: The Emergence of University Square (Piata Universitatii), Bucharest as a space of protest Craig Young, Duncan Light and Daniela Dumbraveanu 06. Social Characteristic of Squares as Urban Spaces, Ulus and Kizilay Squares in Ankara Nuray Bayraktar 07. Order and Heterotopia in an Urban Space: The Case of a Spanish Square Francisco Adolfo Garcia Jerez 08. Contested Public Spaces and the Right to the City: The Case of Cairo's Historic Bazaar Wael Salah Fahmi Part III. Management and Governance: Transformation and Control 09. The Meaning of Public Space in the Context of Space-Time Behaviour in the `Network City': From Socialist to Sociable Public Space Anastasia Moiseeva, Remon Rooij and Harry Timmermans 10. The Restructuring of Urban Public Space in the `Baltic Pearl' Megan Dixon 11. Public Green Space in Vienna between Utopia and Political Strategy Philipp Rode and Eva Schwab 12. The normative construction of a (public) urban space through the use of policy instruments: some reflections from northern Italy Michela Semprebon 13. Negotiating Public Space in a Shopping Mall Pavel Pospech Conclusions: Rediscovering Public Space Globally Svetlana Hristova and Mariusz Czepczynski Note on Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472453648 20171009
  • Part I: Concepts and Discourses: challenged space of public life 1.Re-Imagining Civil Society: Conflict and Control in the City's Public Spaces 2.Public Space in a Global World: After the Spectacle 3.Seeing the Local in Global Cities Part II: Contestations and rights: public and civic 4.Civic Landscapes of Post-Socialist Cities: Urban Movements and the Recover of Public Spaces 5.Public Space, Memory and Protest during Post-Socialist Transformation: The Emergence of University Square (Piata Universitatii), Bucharest as a space of protest 6.Social Characteristic of Squares as Urban Spaces, Ulus and Kizilay Squares in Ankara 7.Order and Heterotopia in an Urban Space: The Case of a Spanish Square 8.Contested Public Spaces and the Right to the City: The Case of Cairo's Historic Bazaar Part III: Management and governance: transformation and control 9.The Meaning of Public Space In the Context of Space-Time Behaviour in the `Network City': From Socialist to the Sociable Public Space 10.The Restructuring of Urban Public Space in the `Baltic Pearl' 11 Public Green Space in Vienna between Utopia and Political Strategy 12.The normative construction of a (public) urban space through the use of policy instruments: some reflections from northern Italy 13.Negotiating Public Space in a Shopping Mall.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781317073307 20171009
Public Space: Between Reimagination and Occupation examines contemporary public space as a result of intense social production reflecting contradictory trends: the long lasting effects of the global crisis, manifested in supranational trade-offs between political influence, state power and private ownership; and the appearance of global counter-actors, enabled by the expansion of digital communication and networking technologies, and rooted into new participatory cultures, easily growing into mobile cultures of protest. The highlighted cases from Europe, Asia, Africa and North America reveal the roots of the pre-crisis processes of redistribution of capitals and power as an aspect of the transition from the consumerist past into the post-consumerist present, by tracing the slow growth of various social discontents, which have lead only few years later to unspeakable mobilization of new kind of self-conscious globally acting class. This edited volume brings together a broad range of interdisciplinary discussions and approaches, providing sociologists, cultural geographers, and urban planning academics and students an opportunity to explore the various social, cultural, economic and political factors leading to reappropriation and reimagination of the urban commons in the cities within which we live.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472453648 20171009
ProQuest Ebook Central Access limited to 1 user
Book
xi, 121 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction Urban Renewal in North America in a Neoliberal Context Chapter 1 Mega-Projects from the Big Dig to the High Line: Regenerating the City Chapter 2 Urban Renewal in North America Today: From HOPE VI to New Models of Inclusive Urban Re-Development Chapter 3 Creating New Urban Neighborhoods: the Post-Industrial Transformation from Brownfield to Vibrant Community? Chapter 4 Urban Renewal in Vancouver, Canada Chapter 5 Urban Regeneration in North American Today: Outcomes, Trends and Future Challenges Chapter 6 Conclusion and Recommendations.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138206878 20171218
As suburban expansion declines, cities have become essential economic, cultural and social hubs of global connectivity. This book is about urban revitalization across North America, in cities including: San Francisco, Toronto, Boston, Vancouver, New York and Seattle. Infrastructure projects including the High Line and Big Dig are explored alongside urban neighborhood creation and regeneration projects such as Hunters Point in San Francisco and Regent Park in Toronto. Today, these urban regeneration projects have evolved in the context of unprecedented neoliberal public policy and soaring real estate prices. Consequently, they make a complex contribution to urban inequality and poverty trends in many of these cities, including the suburbanization of immigrant settlement and rising inequality. (Re)Generating Inclusive Cities wrestles with challenging, but important questions of urban planning including: who benefits and who loses with these urban regeneration schemes and what policy tools can be used to mitigate harm? We propose a new way forward for understanding and promoting better urban design practices in order to build more socially just and inclusive cities and to ultimately improve the quality of urban life for all.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138206878 20171218
Green Library
Book
viii, 237 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • Chapter 1: Introduction: A New Paradigm for the Built Environment Chapter 2: Why Re-Green the Built Environment? Chapter 3: Ecological Design, Energy, & Waste Chapter 4: Land Conservation & Preservation Chapter 5: Auto-Alternative Transportation: A Catalyst for Greenspace Chapter 6: Roadways Chapter 7: Parking Surfaces Chapter 8: Buildings & Rooftops Chapter 9: Corridors Chapter 10: Alternative Sites Chapter 11: Implementing Green Infrastructure Chapter 12: Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138718791 20170919
Regreening the Built Environment examines the relationship between the built environment and nature and demonstrates how rethinking the role and design of infrastructure can environmentally, economically, and socially sustain the earth. In the past, infrastructure and green or park spaces have been regarded as two opposing factors and placed in conflict with one another through irresponsible patterns of development. This book attempts to change this paradigm and create a new notion that greenspace, parks, and infrastructure can indeed be one in the same. The case studies will demonstrate how existing "gray" infrastructure can be retrofitted with green infrastructure and low impact development techniques. It is quite plausible that a building can be designed that actually creates greenspace or generates energy; likewise, a roadway can be a park, an alley a wildlife corridor, a parking surface a garden. In addition to examining sustainability in the near future, the book also explores such alternatives in the distant and very distant future, questioning the notion of sustainability in the event of an earth-altering, cataclysmic disaster. The strategies presented in this book aim to stimulate discussions within the design profession and will be of great interest to students and practitioners of environmental studies, architecture, and urban design.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138718791 20170919
Green Library