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Journal/Periodical
v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiii, 160 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • 1. The Malaysian Banking Industry. Policies and Practices after the Asian Financial Crisis 2. The Health of the Malaysian Banking Industry 3. Bank Risk Management 4. Bank Bailout Efficacy 5. Conclusion 6. Special Topic: Practitioner Insight on Risk Management Practices (Eric H.Y. Koh).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138545779 20180828
The book provides students and academics in finance and banking with the most recent updates and changes in the Malaysian banking sector post-AFC period. The book explores the evolution of banking policies and practices after the "Tomyam Goong Crisis" and investigates the health of Malaysian banks via efficiency measurement. In addition, it also presents the evolution of bank risk management regulations and practices in Malaysia. The book also discusses the effectiveness of the Malaysian bank bailout strategy with comparison to the banks' bailout in developed countries such as the US. This book is important and timely since there are very limited books in the market that cover the recent developments on Malaysian banking sectors post-AFC period. Hence, this book serves as the valuable resource for all finance and banking students, academic researchers, and practitioners not limited to the Asian region that require in-depth insights on the latest policies and practices in the Malaysian banking sector.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138545779 20180828
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
170 pages ; 20 cm.
Green Library
Book
xxiv, 334 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
  • 1. `A Year of Confusion, Dismay, and Distress': The 1772-73 Financial Crisis and Its Potential Significance 2. A Minsky Bubble? Economic Growth and the Financial Sector in 1763-72 3. `Roguery', `Stupidity', and Permissive Regulation: Asset Speculation and Speculative Projects in 1763-72 4. Propagation and Containment: Financial Contagion and the Lender of Last Resort in 1772-73 5. Impact and Resolution 6. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319709079 20180514
Nowadays remembered mostly through Adam Smith's references to the short-lived Ayr Bank in the Wealth of Nations, the 1772-3 financial crisis was an important historical episode in its own right, taking place during a pivotal period in the development of financial capitalism and coinciding with the start of the traditional industrialisation narrative. It was also one of the earliest purely financial crises occurring in peacetime, and its progress showed an impressive geographical reach, involving England, Scotland, the Netherlands and the North American colonies. This book uses a variety of previously unpublished archival sources to question the bubble narrative usually associated with this crisis, and to identify the mechanisms of financial contagion that allowed the failure of a small private bank in London to cause rapid and severe distress throughout the 18th century financial system. It re-examines the short and turbulent career of the Ayr Bank, and concludes that its failure was the result of cavalier liability management akin to that of Northern Rock in 2007, rather than the poor asset quality alleged in existing literature. It furthermore argues that the Bank of England's prompt efforts to contain the crisis are evidence of a Lender of Last Resort in action, some thirty years before the classical formulation of the concept by Henry Thornton.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319709079 20180514
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (385 p.) : ill. (some col.).
"The Great Financial Crisis of 2007–2010 exposed the existence of significant imperfections in the financial regulatory framework that encouraged excessive risk-taking and increased system vulnerabilities. The resulting high cost of the crisis in terms of lost aggregate income and wealth, and increased unemployment has reinforced the need to improve financial stability within and across countries via changes in traditional microprudential regulation, as well as the introduction of new macroprudential regulations. Amongst the questions raised are: What are the challenges to prudential regulation? How has the regulatory environment changed in recent years? How do the reforms interplay with market discipline, risk-taking incentives and risk management arrangements? Does the new regulatory framework allow for the introduction of financial innovation, and the associated benefits, without increasing disruptive financial risk?"--Publisher's website.
Book
xxi, 366 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Financial machine learning as a distinct subject
  • Part 1: Data analysis. Financial data structures
  • Labeling
  • Sample weights
  • Fractionally differentiated features
  • Part 2: Modelling. Ensemble methods
  • Cross-validation in finance
  • Feature importance
  • Hyper-parameter tuning with cross-validation
  • Part 3: Backtesting. Bet sizing
  • The dangers of backtesting
  • Backtesting through cross-validation
  • Backtesting on synthetic data
  • Backtest statistics
  • Understanding strategy risk
  • Machine learning asset allocation
  • Part 4: Useful financial features. Structural breaks
  • Entropy features
  • Microstructural features
  • Part 5: High-performance computing recipes
  • Multiprocessing and vectorization
  • Brute force and quantum computers
  • High-performance computational intelligence and forecasting technologies/ Kesheng Wu and Horst D. Simon.
Machine learning (ML) is changing virtually every aspect of our lives. Today ML algorithms accomplish tasks that until recently only expert humans could perform. As it relates to finance, this is the most exciting time to adopt a disruptive technology that will transform how everyone invests for generations. Readers will learn how to structure Big data in a way that is amenable to ML algorithms; how to conduct research with ML algorithms on that data; how to use supercomputing methods; how to backtest your discoveries while avoiding false positives. The book addresses real-life problems faced by practitioners on a daily basis, and explains scientifically sound solutions using math, supported by code and examples. Readers become active users who can test the proposed solutions in their particular setting. Written by a recognized expert and portfolio manager, this book will equip investment professionals with the groundbreaking tools needed to succeed in modern finance.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119482086 20180416
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (485 p.) : ill. (some col.).
"This book tells the story of how financial markets have evolved over time and became increasingly more complex. The author, a successful and experienced trader, who among other things won the 2015 battle of the quants futures contest held in New York, shares how one can navigate today's dangerous financial markets and be successful. Readers at all levels will benefit from his analysis and many real life examples and experiences. The coverage is broad and there is considerable discussion on ways to stay out of trouble, protect oneself and grow one's assets. The author was the first one to do turn of the year January effect trades in the futures markets starting in the beginning of S&P 500 futures trading in 1982. That has been successful and the author explains his ideas and experiences from the beginning in simple markets to the current, very complex markets we have in 2017. The author discusses the various ways that traders and investors lose money in the financial markets. Many examples are provided, including Long Term Capital Management, ENRON, Amarath, Neiderhoffer's funds and many major companies such as Lehman Brothers, Society Generale, Saloman Brothers. This is invaluable to understanding ways to avoid such losses. The author discusses great investors and their methods and evaluation and the authors work with several of them. Risk arbitrage and mean reversion strategies are described through actual use. Asset-liability models for pension funds, insurance companies and other financial institutions devised by the author are described. The author uses racetrack bias ideas in behavorial finance in trading index futures and options. Large stock market crashes that can be predicted are discussed with several models of the author and others. Eight mini crashes including the January-February 2016, Brexit and the Trump election that are plausible but largely unpredictable are described and how they were dealt with successfully. Along with ways to deal with them, investment in top quality racehorses, oriental carpets, real estate and other interesting investments are covered. The author was instrumental in viewing racing as a stock market. The ideas are used by the top racing syndicates as well as hedge funds. The book proceeds by weaving these aspects of the financial markets in the modern era into a story of the author's academic, professional and personal life. This is told through the people he met and worked with and the academic and personal travel he had all over the world this past half century. The text is simply written with details, sources and references in the notes of each chapter. Details of various important events and how they evolved are described. There are numerous color and black and white photos in the text plus graphs, tables etc. in the notes to tell the story. The teaching and research into various financial and gambling markets takes the reader to interesting places around the world. These include the US and its many stock market ups and downs, Japan when they were ruling the financial world and then they collapsed, the UK visits with lectures, teaching and research work at their great Universities including Cambridge and Oxford, Europe with many activities in France, Italy, Germany and other places, to Asia including discussions about travels to Persia, Turkey, Singapore, Korea, China, Afghanistan, Russia and other countries. His work with horse racing syndicates took him to Australia and Hong Kong. Crises like those in Greece, US housing and internet and the flash crash are discussed."--Publisher's website.
Book
xix, 282 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
  • 1. Introduction-- Dieu Hack-Polay & Juliana Siwale.- Part I. Diaspora Direct Investment: Rationalities and Impact.- 2. Understanding Diaspora Transnationalism-- Osa-Godwin Osaghae.- 3. Diaspora Investment and African National Economics: Case Studies-- Gift Mugano.- 4. Mapping of Diaspora Direct Investment: Critical Areas of Investment-- Juliana Siwale.- 5. Compassionate investment? Diaspora Contribution to Poverty Alleviation in Francophone West Africa-- Dieu Hack-Polay.- Part II. Management of Diaspora Businesses.- 6. Diaspora Networks: A Social Capital Source for Entrepreneurship in Low-Income and Emerging Economies-- Amon Simba & Nathanael Ojong.- 7. Transnational Diaspora Entrepreneurship: Do Local Social Networks in Home Country Matter?-- Olu Aluko & Walter Mswaka.- 8. Diaspora Businesses in Africa: Survival and Sustainability-- Sombo Muzata Chunda.- 9. Management of Diaspora Businesses: Issues and Learning-- John Opute.- 10. Gender and Diaspora Investment: What Do We Know?-- Roda Madziva, Juliana Siwale & Juliet Thondhlana.- 11. Skilled Migrant African Women of Faith and Diaspora Investment-- Juliet Thondhlana & Roda Madziva.- 12. Conclusion-- Juliet Siwale & Dieu Hack-Polay.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319720463 20180514
Examining the experiences of Africans setting up businesses back home, the main focus of this book is to establish the economic, social and psychological reasons for such `home direct investment'. Despite the personal sacrifices that are often needed in order to set up new ventures, the diaspora invests relentless effort and motivations in the pursuit of home ventures. The authors explore critical areas such as the social and psychological pressures that African Diasporas experience when investing in their home countries, as well as the management of diaspora businesses and the impact of such investment to local economies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319720463 20180514
Green Library
Book
xii, 346 pages ; 24 cm
  • Acknowledgments Introduction: Hamilton and the U.S. Financial Revolution 1. To - (December 1779-March 1780) 2. To James Duane (September 3, 1780) 3. To Robert Morris (April 30, 1781) 4. The Continentalist (1781-1782) 5. Constitution of the Bank of New York (February 23-March 15, 1784) 6. To Thomas Willing (September 13, 1789) 7. Report Relative to a Provision for the Support of Public Credit (January 9, 1790) 8. To Wilhem and Jan Willink, Nicholaas and Jacob Van Staphorst, and Nicholas Hubbard (August 28, 1790) 9. First Report on the Further Provision Necessary for Establishing Public Credit (December 13, 1790) 10. Second Report on the Further Provision Necessary for Establishing Public Credit (Report on a National Bank, December 14, 1790) 11. Report on the Establishment of a Mint (January 28, 1791) 12. Opinion on the Constitutionality of an Act to Establish a National Bank (February 23, 1791) 13. Prospectus of the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures (August 1791) 14. Report on the Subject of Manufactures (December 5, 1791) 15. Letters to William Seton (February 10 and March 22, 1792) 16. Report on a Plan for the Further Support of Public Credit (January 16, 1795) 17. The Defense of the Funding System (July 1795) 18. Articles of Association of the Merchants Bank (April 7, 1803) 19. Conclusion: Legacies of the U.S. Financial Revolution Notes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231184564 20180312
While serving as the first Treasury Secretary from 1789 to 1795, Alexander Hamilton engineered a financial revolution. Hamilton established the Treasury debt market, the dollar, and a central bank, while strategically prompting private entrepreneurs to establish securities markets and stock exchanges and encouraging state governments to charter a number of commercial banks and other business corporations. Yet despite a recent surge of interest in Hamilton, U.S. financial modernization has not been fully recognized as one of his greatest achievements. This book traces the development of Hamilton's financial thinking, policies, and actions through a selection of his writings. The financial historians and Hamilton experts Richard Sylla and David J. Cowen provide commentary that demonstrates the impact Hamilton had on the modern economic system, guiding readers through Hamilton's distinguished career. The book showcases Hamilton's thoughts on the nation's founding, the need for a strong central government, confronting problems such as a depreciating paper currency and weak public credit, and the architecture of the financial system. His great state papers on public credit, the national bank, the mint, and manufactures instructed reform of the nation's finances and jumpstarted economic growth. Hamilton practiced what he preached: he played a key role in the founding of three banks and a manufacturing corporation, and his deft political maneuvering and economic savvy saved the fledgling republic's economy during the country's first full-blown financial crisis in 1792. Sylla and Cowen center Hamilton's writings on finance among his most important accomplishments, making his brilliance as an economic policy maker accessible to all interested in this Founding Father's legacy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231184564 20180312
Green Library
Book
xii, 346 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: Hamilton and the U.S. financial revolution
  • To-- (December 1779-March 1780)
  • To James Duane (September 3, 1780)
  • To Robert Morris (April 30, 1781)
  • The continentalist (1781-1782)
  • Constitution of the Bank of New York (February 23-March 15, 1784)
  • To Thomas Willing (September 13, 1789)
  • Report relative to a provision for the support of public credit (January 9, 1790)
  • To Wilhelm and Jan Willink, Nicholaas and Jacob Van Staphorst, and Nicholas Hubbard (August 28, 1790)
  • First report on the further provision necessary for establishing public credit (December 13, 1790)
  • Second report on the further provision necessary for establishing public credit (report on a national bank, December 14, 1790)
  • Report on the etablishment of a mint (January 28, 1791)
  • Opinion on the constitutionality of an act to establish a national bank (February 23, 1791)
  • Prospectus of the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures (August 1791)
  • Report on the subject of manufactures (December 5, 1791)
  • To William Seton (February 10 and March 22, 1792)
  • Report on a plan for the further support of public credit (January 16, 1795)
  • The defense of the funding system (July 1795)
  • Articles of Association of the Merchants Bank (April 7, 1803)
  • Conclusion: Legacies of the U.S. financial revolution.
While serving as the first Treasury Secretary from 1789 to 1795, Alexander Hamilton engineered a financial revolution. Hamilton established the Treasury debt market, the dollar, and a central bank, while strategically prompting private entrepreneurs to establish securities markets and stock exchanges and encouraging state governments to charter a number of commercial banks and other business corporations. Yet despite a recent surge of interest in Hamilton, U.S. financial modernization has not been fully recognized as one of his greatest achievements. This book traces the development of Hamilton's financial thinking, policies, and actions through a selection of his writings. The financial historians and Hamilton experts Richard Sylla and David J. Cowen provide commentary that demonstrates the impact Hamilton had on the modern economic system, guiding readers through Hamilton's distinguished career. The book showcases Hamilton's thoughts on the nation's founding, the need for a strong central government, confronting problems such as a depreciating paper currency and weak public credit, and the architecture of the financial system. His great state papers on public credit, the national bank, the mint, and manufactures instructed reform of the nation's finances and jumpstarted economic growth. Hamilton practiced what he preached: he played a key role in the founding of three banks and a manufacturing corporation, and his deft political maneuvering and economic savvy saved the fledgling republic's economy during the country's first full-blown financial crisis in 1792. Sylla and Cowen center Hamilton's writings on finance among his most important accomplishments, making his brilliance as an economic policy maker accessible to all interested in this Founding Father's legacy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231184564 20180312
Law Library (Crown)
Book
428 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
224 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

13. Banchieri [2018]

Book
xvii, 541 pages ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
555 pages : illustrations, genealogical tables ; 25 cm
  • Grusswort
  • Einleitung : die Geschichte des Bank- und Börsenplatzes Essen
  • Die Anfänge der Essener Finanzwirtschaft 1800-1870
  • Stadt und Wirtschaft in Essen
  • Der Handel als Ursprung des Essener Privatbankwesens
  • Die Gründung der Essener Sparkassen
  • Die Essener Finanzwirtschaft im Deutschen Kaiserreich 1871-1914
  • Entwicklungstendenzen und Konkurrenzsituationen der Essener Finanzwirtschaft
  • Die Essener Börse als Kuxenhandelsplatz
  • Die Regionalbanken
  • Der regionale Branchenprimus : die Essener Credit-Anstalt
  • Die kurzlebigen Konkurrenten : Essener Bankverein und Rheinische Bank
  • Die Privatbanken unter Druck
  • Die Sparkasse Essen
  • Die allgemeine Entwicklung während des Kaiserreichs
  • Die Essener Führungsrolle im Allgemeinen Deutschen Sparkassenverband
  • Die Essener Kreditgenossenschaften
  • Die Wohnungs- und Baufinanzierung in der expandierenden Stadt
  • Spar- und Baugenossenschaften
  • Die städtische Förderung des Hypothekarkredits
  • Private Hypothekenbanken
  • Die Essener Bankiers in der Stadtgesellschaft
  • Das Sozialgepräge der Essener Bankiers
  • Die jüdischen Bankiers
  • Der Essener Bank- und Börsenplatz im Ersten Weltkrieg und während der Inflationszeit 1914-1923
  • Die allgemeine politische und wirtschaftliche Entwicklung in Essen
  • Die Essener Finanzwirtschaft in den Jahren der Krise
  • Zwischen den Krisen : die Weimarer Konjunktur 1924-1929
  • Die Verdrängung der Regionalbanken durch die Berliner Grossbanken
  • Die Eröffnung von Grossbank-Filialen in Essen
  • Die Fusion der Essener Credit-Anstalt mit der Deutschen Bank 1925
  • Die Kettwiger Bank als Gegenmodell
  • Der Werdegang der Essener Privatbanken
  • Sparkassen, Genossenschafts- und Arbeitnehmerbanken
  • Die Essener Sparkasse
  • Die Essener Bank
  • Die Deutsche Volksbank
  • Die Essener Börse zwischen Anspruch und Wirklichkeit
  • Die Essener Banken während der Weltwirtschaftsund Bankenkrise
  • Der Zusammenbruch der Essener Bank
  • Die Existenzkrise des Bankhauses Simon Hirschland
  • Ein scheinbar hoffnungsloser Fall : die Deutsche Volksbank
  • Der Bankplatz Essen im "Dritten Reich"
  • Terror, Manipulation und Kollaboration : die Nationalsozialisten bemächtigen sich der Stadt Essen
  • Essen im nationalsozialistischen "Wirtschaftsaufschwung"
  • Das Ende der Essener Börse
  • Das Schicksal der Essener Gewerkschaftsbanken und die Schaffung der "National-Bank"
  • Die Sparkasse Essen
  • Die Essener Kreditgenossenschaften
  • Die Essener Filialen der Grossbanken und weitere Privatbanken in Essen
  • Eine Bank mit öffentlichem Auftrag : die DBB
  • Der Betriebsalltag im "Dritten Reich"
  • Die Verdrängung der jüdischen Banken aus der Essener Finanzwelt
  • Die Essener Banken im Zweiten Weltkrieg
  • Die Essener Banken seit 1945
  • Das Kriegsende in Essen und die Bankenwelt : keine "Stunde Null"
  • Die Entnazifizierung bei den Essener Banken
  • Essen als Trümmerlandschaft : ein schwieriger Neubeginn
  • Herausforderungen und Erfolge für die Essener Banken : die Währungsreform 1948 und das "Wirtschaftswunder"
  • Bauen für Essen : Banken beim Wiederaufbau und der Entwicklung der Stadt
  • Die Sparkasse Essen nach 1945
  • Die Sparkasse Essen im Aufwind
  • Die Sparkasse Essen und die Girozentrale : Symbiose oder Konkurrenz?
  • Die Grossbanken in Essen nach 1945
  • Nicht nur ein Bankplatz für die Grossbanken : Essener Privatbanken nach 1945
  • Einheit in Vielfalt : Kreditgenossenschaften und Gewerkschaftsbanken
  • Im Zeichen des Massengeschäfts : Kleinkredit, Volksaktien und die Essener "Teilzahlungsbanken"
  • Strukturwandel und Wirtschaftskrisen
  • Der Wandel der Arbeitswelt und neue Geschäftsfelder : der Abschied von den "Lohnzetteln" und der Einzug des Computers
  • Episoden in den Zeiten der Privatbank-Krisen : der Niedergang des Bankhauses Carl Chr. Gossenberg & Co. KG und die Fusion von Burkhardt & Co. mit C. G. Trinkaus
  • Umbrüche : die Essener Banken von der Wiedervereinigung bis zur Griechenlandkrise 2010-11
  • Ein Ausblick : von der Finanzkrise des Jahres 2008 bis heute
  • Danksagung
  • Anhang
  • Anmerkungen
  • Archivverzeichnis
  • Literaturverzeichnis
  • Bildnachweis
  • Personenverzeichnis
  • Banken- und Unternehmensverzeichnis.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource.
  • Foreword xi Introduction xv 1 Banking Risk 1 1.1 Single Bank Risk 4 1.2 The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision Approach to Regulation 14 1.3 Banking Risk Modeling and Stress Testing 33 1.4 Contagion 36 1.5 System Modeling 41 2 Simulation Models 45 2.1 Simulating Shocks: Idiosyncratic Shocks, or Exogenous Failure of Individual Banks 49 2.2 Simulating Shocks: Stress Testing 54 2.3 Simulating Shocks: Systematic Common Shocks 56 2.4 Simulating Shocks: Common Shocks 58 2.5 Estimation of Losses Variability and Assets Riskiness 70 2.6 Simulating Shocks: Correlated Risk Factors 82 2.7 Simulating Shocks: Combining Idiosyncratic and Common Shocks 87 2.8 Correlation 89 2.9 The Interbank Matrix 98 2.10 Loss Given Default 127 2.11 Interbank Losses Attribution 132 2.12 Contagion Simulation Methods 133 2.13 Data and Applied Problems 140 3 Real Economy, Sovereign Risk, and Banking Systems Linkages 149 3.1 Effects of Bank Riskiness on Sovereign Risk 150 3.2 Effects of Sovereign Risk on Bank Riskiness 153 3.3 Linkages to the Real Economy 154 3.4 Modeling 156 3.5 Implementation 159 4 Applications 163 4.1 Testing for Banks Public Finances Contagion Risk 163 4.2 Banking Systems Regulation What-If Tests 164 4.3 Banks Minimum Capital Requirements: Cost Benefit Analysis 169 4.4 Deposits Guarantee Schemes (DGS)/Resolution Funds Dimensioning 174 4.5 Computing Capital Coverage from Assets PD and Bank PD 178 4.6 Computing Banks Probability to Default from Capital Coverage and Assets PD 180 4.7 Risk Contributions and SiFis 182 4.8 The Regulator s Dilemma 202 Appendix: Software References and Tools 205 References 223 Index 235.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119195894 20170403
Presents information sources and methodologies for modeling and simulating banking system stability Combining both academic and institutional knowledge and experience, Banking Systems Simulation: Theory, Practice, and Application of Modeling Shocks, Losses, and Contagion presents banking system risk modeling clearly within a theoretical framework. Written from the global financial perspective, the book explores single bank risk, common bank exposures, and contagion, and how these apply on a systemic level. Zedda approaches these simulation methods logically by providing the basic building blocks of modeling and simulation, and then delving further into the individual techniques that make up a systems model. In addition, the author provides clear and detailed explanations of the foundational research into the mathematical and legal concepts used to analyze banking risk problems, measures and data for representing the main banking risk sources, and the major problems researchers are likely to encounter. There are numerous software descriptions throughout, with references and tools to help readers gain a proper understanding of the presented techniques and possibly develop new applications and research. The book concludes with an appendix that features real-world datasets and models. In addition, this book: Provides a comprehensive overview of methods for analyzing models and simulating risk for banking and financial systems Provides a clear presentation of the technical and legal concepts used in banking regulation Presents unique insights from an expert s perspective, with specific coverage of assessing risks and developing what-if analyses at the systems level Concludes with a discussion of applications, including banking systems regulation what-if tests, cost-benefit analysis, evaluations of banking systems stability effects on public finances, dimensioning, and risk-based contributions for Deposit Guarantee Schemes (DGS) and Resolution Funds Banking Systems Simulation: Theory, Practice, and Application of Modeling Shocks, Losses, and Contagion is ideal for banking researchers focusing on computational methods of analysis as well as an appropriate reference for graduate-level students in banking, finance, and computational methods. Stefano Zedda is Researcher in Financial Mathematics at the University of Cagliari in Italy and qualified as associate professor in banking and corporate finance. His research is mainly focused on quantitative analyses for banking and finance, with a particular focus on banking systems modeling and simulation. In 2008, Zedda developed the mathematical modeling and software implementation of the Systemic Model for Banking Originated Losses (SYMBOL), further developed during his activity at the European Commission. The Commission subsequently adopted it as a standard tool for testing banking regulation proposals. Stefano Zedda s research interests include banking, financial mathematics, and statistics, specifically simulation of banking and financial systems stability, banking regulation impact assessment, and interactive agent simulation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119195894 20170403
Book
xii, 207 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: What are blockchains and how are they relevant to governance in the contemporary global political economy? / Malcom Campbell-Verduyn
  • Moneys at the margins : from political experiment to cashless societies / Moritz Hütten and Matthias Thiemann
  • The internal and external governance of blockchain-based organizations : evidence from cryptocurrencies / Ying-Ying Hsieh, Jean Philippe (JP) Vergne, and Sha Wang
  • The mutual constitution of technology and global governance : Bitcoin, blockchains, and the international anti-money-laundering regime / Malcom Campbell-Verduyn and Marcel Goguen
  • Between liberalization and prohibition : prudent enthusiasm and the governance of Bitcoin/blockchain technology / Kai Jia and Falin Zhang
  • Cryptocurrencies and digital payment rails in network global governance : perspectives on inclusion and innovation / Daivi Rodima-Taylor and William W. Grimes
  • Governing what wasn't meant to be governed : a controversy-based approach to the study of Bitcoin governance / Francesca Musiani, Alexandre Mallard, and Cécile Méadel
  • Experiments in algorithmic governance : a history and ethnography of "The DAO," a failed decentralized autonomous organization / Quinn Dupont
  • Conclusion: Towards a block age or blockages of global governance / Malcom Campbell-Verduyn.
Since the launch of Bitcoin in 2009 several hundred different `cryptocurrencies' have been developed and become accepted for a wide variety of transactions in leading online commercial marketplaces and the `sharing economy', as well as by more traditional retailers, manufacturers, and even by charities and political parties. Bitcoin and its competitors have also garnered attention for their wildly fluctuating values as well as implication in international money laundering, Ponzi schemes and online trade in illicit goods and services across borders. These and other controversies surrounding cryptocurrencies have induced varying governance responses by central banks, government ministries, international organizations, and industry regulators worldwide. Besides formal attempts to ban Bitcoin, there have been multifaceted efforts to incorporate elements of blockchains, the peer-to-peer technology underlying cryptocurrencies, in the wider exchange, recording, and broadcasting of digital transactions. Blockchains are being mobilized to support and extend an array of governance activities. The novelty and breadth of growing blockchain-based activities have fuelled both utopian promises and dystopian fears regarding applications of the emergent technology to Bitcoin and beyond. This volume brings scholars of anthropology, economics, Science and Technology Studies, and sociology together with GPE scholars in assessing the actual implications posed by Bitcoin and blockchains for contemporary global governance. Its interdisciplinary contributions provide academics, policymakers, industry practitioners and the general public with more nuanced understandings of technological change in the changing character of governance within and across the borders of nation-states.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415792141 20180423
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xviii, 286 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • About the Author xi Foreword xiii Prologue xv Chapter 1 Money 1 Chapter 2 Primitive Moneys 11 Chapter 3 Monetary Metals 17 Why Gold? 19 Roman Golden Age and Decline 25 Byzantium and the Bezant 28 The Renaissance 29 La Belle Epoque 34 Chapter 4 Government Money 41 Monetary Nationalism and the End of the Free World 43 The Interwar Era 47 World War II and Bretton Woods 53 Government Money's Track Record 60 Chapter 5 Money and Time Preference 73 Monetary Inflation 81 Saving and Capital Accumulation 90 Innovations: "Zero to One" versus "One to Many" 96 Artistic Flourishing 98 Chapter 6 Capitalism's Information System 105 Capital Market Socialism 109 Business Cycles and Financial Crises 113 Sound Basis for Trade 126 Chapter 7 Sound Money and Individual Freedom 135 Should Government Manage the Money Supply? 136 Unsound Money and Perpetual War 145 Limited versus Omnipotent Government 149 The Bezzle 155 Chapter 8 Digital Money 167 Bitcoin as Digital Cash 168 Supply, Value, and Transactions 177 Appendix to Chapter 8 191 Chapter 9 What Is Bitcoin Good For? 193 Store of Value 193 Individual Sovereignty 200 International and Online Settlement 205 Global Unit of Account 212 Chapter 10 Bitcoin Questions 217 Is Bitcoin Mining a Waste? 217 Out of Control: Why Nobody Can Change Bitcoin 222 Antifragility 230 Can Bitcoin Scale? 232 Is Bitcoin for Criminals? 238 How to Kill Bitcoin: A Beginners' Guide 241 Altcoins 251 Blockchain Technology 257 Acknowledgements 273 Bibliography 275 List of Figures 282 List of Tables 284 Index 285.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119473893 20180924
When a pseudonymous programmer introduced "a new electronic cash system that's fully peer-to-peer, with no trusted third party" to a small online mailing list in 2008, very few paid attention. Ten years later, and against all odds, this upstart autonomous decentralized software offers an unstoppable and globally-accessible hard money alternative to modern central banks. The Bitcoin Standard analyzes the historical context to the rise of Bitcoin, the economic properties that have allowed it to grow quickly, and its likely economic, political, and social implications. While Bitcoin is a new invention of the digital age, the problem it purports to solve is as old as human society itself: transferring value across time and space. Ammous takes the reader on an engaging journey through the history of technologies performing the functions of money, from primitive systems of trading limestones and seashells, to metals, coins, the gold standard, and modern government debt. Exploring what gave these technologies their monetary role, and how most lost it, provides the reader with a good idea of what makes for sound money, and sets the stage for an economic discussion of its consequences for individual and societal future-orientation, capital accumulation, trade, peace, culture, and art. Compellingly, Ammous shows that it is no coincidence that the loftiest achievements of humanity have come in societies enjoying the benefits of sound monetary regimes, nor is it coincidental that monetary collapse has usually accompanied civilizational collapse. With this background in place, the book moves on to explain the operation of Bitcoin in a functional and intuitive way. Bitcoin is a decentralized, distributed piece of software that converts electricity and processing power into indisputably accurate records, thus allowing its users to utilize the Internet to perform the traditional functions of money without having to rely on, or trust, any authorities or infrastructure in the physical world. Bitcoin is thus best understood as the first successfully implemented form of digital cash and digital hard money. With an automated and perfectly predictable monetary policy, and the ability to perform final settlement of large sums across the world in a matter of minutes, Bitcoin's real competitive edge might just be as a store of value and network for final settlement of large payments--a digital form of gold with a built-in settlement infrastructure. Ammous' firm grasp of the technological possibilities as well as the historical realities of monetary evolution provides for a fascinating exploration of the ramifications of voluntary free market money. As it challenges the most sacred of government monopolies, Bitcoin shifts the pendulum of sovereignty away from governments in favor of individuals, offering us the tantalizing possibility of a world where money is fully extricated from politics and unrestrained by borders. The final chapter of the book explores some of the most common questions surrounding Bitcoin: Is Bitcoin mining a waste of energy? Is Bitcoin for criminals? Who controls Bitcoin, and can they change it if they please? How can Bitcoin be killed? And what to make of all the thousands of Bitcoin knock-offs, and the many supposed applications of Bitcoin's 'blockchain technology'? The Bitcoin Standard is the essential resource for a clear understanding of the rise of the Internet's decentralized, apolitical, free-market alternative to national central banks.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119473893 20180924
Green Library
Book
xx, 344 pages ; 21 cm
"The story of billionaire trader Steven Cohen, the rise and fall of his hedge fund SAC Capital, and the largest insider trading investigation in history--for readers of The Big Short, Den of Thieves, and Dark Money Steven A. Cohen changed Wall Street. He and his fellow pioneers of the hedge fund industry didn't lay railroads, build factories, or invent new technologies. Rather, they made their billions through speculation, by placing bets in the market that turned out to be right more often than wrong--and for this, they gained not only extreme personal wealth but formidable influence throughout society. Hedge funds now oversee more than $3 trillion in assets, and the competition between them is so fierce that traders will do whatever they can to get an edge. Cohen was one of the industry's biggest success stories, the person everyone else in the business wanted to be. Born into a middle-class family on Long Island, he longed from an early age to be a star on Wall Street. He mastered poker in high school, went off to Wharton, and in 1992 launched the hedge fund SAC Capital, which he built into a $15 billion empire, almost entirely on the basis of his wizardlike stock trading. He cultivated an air of mystery, reclusiveness, and excess, building a 35,000-square-foot mansion in Greenwich, Connecticut, flying to work by helicopter, and amassing one of the largest private art collections in the world. On Wall Street, Cohen was revered as a genius: one of the greatest traders who ever lived. That image was shattered when SAC Capital became the target of a sprawling, seven-year investigation, led by a determined group of FBI agents, prosecutors, and SEC enforcement attorneys. Labeled by prosecutors as a "magnet for market cheaters" whose culture encouraged the relentless pursuit of "edge"--and even "black edge," which is inside information--SAC Capital was ultimately indicted and pleaded guilty to charges of securities and wire fraud in connection with a vast insider trading scheme, even as Cohen himself was never charged. Black Edge offers a revelatory look at the gray zone in which so much of Wall Street functions. It's a riveting, true-life legal thriller that takes readers inside the government's pursuit of Cohen and his employees, and raises urgent and troubling questions about the power and wealth of those who sit at the pinnacle of modern Wall Street. Advance praise for Black Edge "A tour de force of groundbreaking reporting and brilliant storytelling, a revealing inside account of how the Feds track a high-profile target--and, just as important, an unsettling portrayal of how Wall Street works today."--Jeffrey Toobin, New York Times bestselling author of American Heiress "Black Edge is not just a work of major importance, it is also addictively readable--and horrifyingly compelling. Sheelah Kolhatkar pulls back the curtain on the cheating, corruption, and skulduggery that underlie large swaths of the hedge fund industry and some of Wall Street's most fabled fortunes. This book is as hard to put down as it is to stomach."--Jane Mayer, New York Times bestselling author of Dark Money "Fast-paced and filled with twists, Black Edge has the grip of a thriller. It is also an essential expose of our times--a work that reveals the deep rot in our financial system. Everyone should read this book."--David Grann, New York Times bestselling author of The Lost City of Z"-- Provided by publisher.
"Steven A. Cohen is a Wall Street legend. Born into a middle class family in a decidedly upper class suburb on Long Island, he was unpopular in high school and unlucky with girls. Then he went off to Wharton, and in 1992 launched the hedge fund SAC Capital, which grew into a $15 billion empire. He cultivated an air of mystery and reclusiveness -- at one point, owned the copyright to almost every picture taken of him -- and also of extreme excess, building a 35,000 square foot house in Greenwich, flying to work by helicopter, and amassing one of the largest private art collections in the world. But on Wall Street, he was revered as a genius: one of the greatest traders who ever lived. That public image was shattered when SAC Capital became the target of a sprawling, seven-year criminal and SEC investigation, the largest in Wall Street history, led by an undermanned but determined group of government agents, prosecutors, and investigators. Experts in finding and using "black edge" (inside information), SAC Capital was ultimately fined nearly $2 billion -- the largest penalty in history -- and shut down. But as Sheelah Kolhatkar shows, Steven Cohen was never actually put out of business. He was allowed to keep trading his own money (in 2015, he made $350 million), and can start a new hedge fund in only a few years. Though eight SAC employees were convicted or pleaded guilty to insider trading, Cohen himself walked away a free man. Black Edge is a riveting, true-life thriller that raises an urgent and troubling question: Are Wall Street titans like Steven Cohen above the law?"-- Provided by publisher.
Business Library
Book
1 online resource (xxvii, 752 pages) : digital, PDF file(s).
In this book, well-known expert Riccardo Rebonato provides the theoretical foundations (no-arbitrage, convexity, expectations, risk premia) needed for the affine modeling of the government bond markets. He presents and critically discusses the wealth of empirical findings that have appeared in the literature of the last decade, and introduces the 'structural' models that are used by central banks, institutional investors, sovereign wealth funds, academics, and advanced practitioners to model the yield curve, to answer policy questions, to estimate the magnitude of the risk premium, to gauge market expectations, and to assess investment opportunities. Rebonato weaves precise theory with up-to-date empirical evidence to build, with the minimum mathematical sophistication required for the task, a critical understanding of what drives the government bond market.
Book
xiv, 365 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Green Library