Book
xix, 235 p.
  • Foreword. Acknowledgments. Introduction. Notes. Chapter 1 What Is One Report? The Meaning of One Report. Novo Nordisk: An Early Adopter of One Report. Rhetoric and Design in Natura's 2008 Annual Report. The Urgent Need for One Report. Notes. Chapter 2 United Technologies Corporation's First Integrated Report. UTC's First One Report. A Brief History of Corporate Reporting at UTC. More on the 2008 Report. UTC's Half-Century of Corporate Reporting. Notes. Chapter 3 The State of Financial Reporting Today. Background on Financial Reporting. Complexity. Extensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL). Auditing. Notes. Chapter 4 The State of Nonfinancial Reporting Today. A Typology of Nonfinancial Information. Intangible Assets. Intangible Assets at Infosys. Key Performance Indicators. Environmental, Social and Governance Metrics. Assurance on Nonfinancial Information. Notes. Chapter 5 Sustainable Strategies for a Sustainable Society. Sustainability at Ricoh. Corporate Social Responsibility. Sustainability. Sustainable Competitive Advantage. Sustainable Strategies Require Integrated Reporting. Corporate Reporting at Ricoh. Notes. Chapter 6 It's Time for One Report. The Case for One Report. One Report for a Sustainable Strategy for a Sustainable Society. The Time Is Now. Objections to One Report. The Bottom Line. Notes. Chapter 7 The Internet and Integrated Reporting. A Web-based Perspective on One Report. The Essential Elements of Web-based Integrated Reporting. Web 3.0 and Integrated Reporting. Notes. Chapter 8 Integrated Reporting for a Sustainable Society. Companies Must Take Responsibility. Innovation. Support from the Investment Community. Development of Standards. Legislation and Regulation. Support from Civil Society. Notes. Appendix A: Companies and Organizations with URLs. Appendix B: Acronyms. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470587515 20160607
Winner of the 2010 PROSE Award for Best Business, Finance, & Management Book! "One Report" refers to an emerging trend in business taking place throughout the world where companies are going beyond separate reports for financial and nonfinancial (e.g., corporate social responsibility or sustainability) results and integrating both into a single integrated report. At the same time, they are also leveraging the Internet to provide more detailed results to all of their stakeholders and for improving their level of dialogue and engagement with them. Providing best practice examples from companies around the world, One Report shows how integrated reporting adds tremendous value to the company and all of its stakeholders, including shareholders, and also ultimately contributes to a sustainable society. Focuses on the emerging trend of integrated reporting as a top priority for companies, investors, regulators, auditors and civil society Provides compelling case studies from some of the world's leading companies doing integrated reporting Addresses how companies can move toward One Report and how it can become a keystone of a sustainable strategy for both the company and society Explains what others-such as analysts, shareholders, other stakeholders, auditors, regulators, legislators, and civil society-need to do to enable the rapid and broad adoption of One Report Filled with case studies and the most current trends on integrated reporting, this book is an invaluable guidebook on the future of reporting and how this future can lead to a sustainable society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470587515 20160607
Book
xix, 311 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Foreword ix Preface xiii Acknowledgments xvii Chapter 1: South Africa 1 The Uniqueness of South Africa 2 South Africa s Journey to Integrated Reporting 3 South African Assessment of the South African Experience 10 Our Reflections on the South African Experience 18 Notes 18 Chapter 2: Meaning 31 Company Experimentation: Examples from the First Integrated Reports 32 Expert Commentary: The First Reflections on Integrated Reporting 40 Codification: Creating Common Meaning 44 Notes 51 Chapter 3: Momentum 59 Adoption 61 Accelerators 63 Awareness 78 Notes 80 Chapter 4: Motives 97 Companies 98 Audience 102 Supporting Organizations and Initiatives 106 Regulators 107 Service Providers 109 Notes 111 Chapter 5: Materiality 119 The Social Construction of Materiality 120 Materiality in Environmental Reporting 122 Comparing Different Definitions of Materiality 123 Audience 127 Governance 129 Materiality for Integrated Reporting 132 Notes 134 Chapter 6: The Sustainable Value Matrix 147 A Short History of the Materiality Matrix 147 Issues with the Matrix 150 The Current State of Materiality Matrices 152 From the Materiality Matrix to the Sustainable Value Matrix 157 Notes 165 Appendix 6A: Comparing the Ford and Daimler Materiality Matrices 173 Notes 177 Appendix 6B: Methodology for the Materiality Matrices Review 179 Note 189 Chapter 7: Report Quality 191 The Six Capitals 192 Content Elements 194 Special Factors 200 Assurance 207 Notes 209 Appendix 7A: Methodology for Analyzing 124 Company Integrated Reports 221 Notes 223 Chapter 8: Reporting Websites 225 Methodology 226 Website Category Analysis 227 Website Feature Analysis 233 Three Examples 241 Notes 246 Appendix 8A: Methodology for Website Coding 253 Chapter 9: Information Technology 261 Integrated Reporting Processes 262 Four IT Trends 265 Contextual Reporting 269 (World Market Basket) 271 Notes 274 Chapter 10: Four Recommendations 281 A Very Brief History of Financial Reporting 282 Balancing Experimentation and Codification 283 Balancing Market and Regulatory Forces 285 Greater Advocacy from the Accounting Community 287 Achieving Clarity Regarding the Roles of Key Organizations 289 A Possible Scenario 290 Final Reflection 292 Notes 292 About the Authors 299 Index 301.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118646984 20160617
An in-depth, enlightening look at the integrated reporting movement The Integrated Reporting Movement explores the meaning of the concept, explains the forces that provide momentum to the associated movement, and examines the motives of the actors involved. The book posits integrated reporting as a key mechanism by which companies can ensure their own long-term sustainability by contributing to a sustainable society. Although integrated reporting has seen substantial development due to the support of companies, investors, and the initiatives of a number of NGOs, widespread regulatory intervention has yet to materialize. Outside of South Africa, adoption remains voluntary, accomplished via social movement abetted, to varying degrees, by market forces. In considering integrated reporting s current state of play, the authors provide guidance to ensure wider adoption of the practice and success of the movement, starting with how companies can improve their own reporting processes. But the support of investors, regulators, and NGOs is also important. All will benefit, as will society as a whole. Readers will learn how integrated reporting has evolved over the years, where frameworks and standards are today, and the practices that help ensure effective implementation including, but not limited to an extensive discussion of information technology s role in reporting and the importance of corporate reporting websites. The authors introduce the concepts of an annual board of directors Statement of Significant Audiences and Materiality and a Sustainable Value Matrix tool that translates the statement into management decisions. The book argues that the appropriate combination of market and regulatory forces to speed adoption will vary by country, concluding with four specific recommendations about what must be done to accelerate high quality adoption of integrated reporting around the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118646984 20160617
Business Library
Book
xix, 311 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Foreword ix Preface xiii Acknowledgments xvii Chapter 1: South Africa 1 The Uniqueness of South Africa 2 South Africa s Journey to Integrated Reporting 3 South African Assessment of the South African Experience 10 Our Reflections on the South African Experience 18 Notes 18 Chapter 2: Meaning 31 Company Experimentation: Examples from the First Integrated Reports 32 Expert Commentary: The First Reflections on Integrated Reporting 40 Codification: Creating Common Meaning 44 Notes 51 Chapter 3: Momentum 59 Adoption 61 Accelerators 63 Awareness 78 Notes 80 Chapter 4: Motives 97 Companies 98 Audience 102 Supporting Organizations and Initiatives 106 Regulators 107 Service Providers 109 Notes 111 Chapter 5: Materiality 119 The Social Construction of Materiality 120 Materiality in Environmental Reporting 122 Comparing Different Definitions of Materiality 123 Audience 127 Governance 129 Materiality for Integrated Reporting 132 Notes 134 Chapter 6: The Sustainable Value Matrix 147 A Short History of the Materiality Matrix 147 Issues with the Matrix 150 The Current State of Materiality Matrices 152 From the Materiality Matrix to the Sustainable Value Matrix 157 Notes 165 Appendix 6A: Comparing the Ford and Daimler Materiality Matrices 173 Notes 177 Appendix 6B: Methodology for the Materiality Matrices Review 179 Note 189 Chapter 7: Report Quality 191 The Six Capitals 192 Content Elements 194 Special Factors 200 Assurance 207 Notes 209 Appendix 7A: Methodology for Analyzing 124 Company Integrated Reports 221 Notes 223 Chapter 8: Reporting Websites 225 Methodology 226 Website Category Analysis 227 Website Feature Analysis 233 Three Examples 241 Notes 246 Appendix 8A: Methodology for Website Coding 253 Chapter 9: Information Technology 261 Integrated Reporting Processes 262 Four IT Trends 265 Contextual Reporting 269 (World Market Basket) 271 Notes 274 Chapter 10: Four Recommendations 281 A Very Brief History of Financial Reporting 282 Balancing Experimentation and Codification 283 Balancing Market and Regulatory Forces 285 Greater Advocacy from the Accounting Community 287 Achieving Clarity Regarding the Roles of Key Organizations 289 A Possible Scenario 290 Final Reflection 292 Notes 292 About the Authors 299 Index 301.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118646984 20160617
An in-depth, enlightening look at the integrated reporting movement The Integrated Reporting Movement explores the meaning of the concept, explains the forces that provide momentum to the associated movement, and examines the motives of the actors involved. The book posits integrated reporting as a key mechanism by which companies can ensure their own long-term sustainability by contributing to a sustainable society. Although integrated reporting has seen substantial development due to the support of companies, investors, and the initiatives of a number of NGOs, widespread regulatory intervention has yet to materialize. Outside of South Africa, adoption remains voluntary, accomplished via social movement abetted, to varying degrees, by market forces. In considering integrated reporting s current state of play, the authors provide guidance to ensure wider adoption of the practice and success of the movement, starting with how companies can improve their own reporting processes. But the support of investors, regulators, and NGOs is also important. All will benefit, as will society as a whole. Readers will learn how integrated reporting has evolved over the years, where frameworks and standards are today, and the practices that help ensure effective implementation including, but not limited to an extensive discussion of information technology s role in reporting and the importance of corporate reporting websites. The authors introduce the concepts of an annual board of directors Statement of Significant Audiences and Materiality and a Sustainable Value Matrix tool that translates the statement into management decisions. The book argues that the appropriate combination of market and regulatory forces to speed adoption will vary by country, concluding with four specific recommendations about what must be done to accelerate high quality adoption of integrated reporting around the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118646984 20160617
Green Library
Book
xxii, 183 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Thought-provoking and provocative, Slow Finance anticipates a profound change in public attitudes. It outlines how credit growth and globalisation have contributed to the excessive scale of the financial sector. Just as the Slow Food movement represents a reaction to the food industry losing sight of its ultimate purpose, Slow Finance explores how parallel trends will soon be reflected in the investment world. At once think-piece, potted history and call-to-action, the ideas in Slow Finance is an essential read for professionals, academics, business leaders and private investors alike, as well as policy-makers seeking a more sustainable approach to investing. Praise for Slow Finance: 'Before buying or selling another share, investors should read Slow Finance...This well-researched and thought-provoking book is a "must read" for all serious investors, especially during these uncertain times.' Paul Marsh, Emeritus Professor of Finance, London Business School 'Slow Finance raises fundamental questions over the real purpose of savings. Local investment can boost domestic job creation and national growth at a time when we need it most. This book is a real breath of fresh air, since there are better ways to be successful.' Rob Senior, CEO, Saatchi & Saatchi.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781408151631 20160607
Green Library
Book
ii, 21 pages : color illustrations ; 30 cm
Green Library
Book
xi, 274 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Looking beyond the hype and entrenched myths / Milford Bateman
  • Microfinance in ultra-poor communities : the experience of Medellín, Colombia / Milford Bateman, Juan Pablo Durán Ortiz, and Dean Sinković
  • Commercialization of microfinance : resolution or extension of poverty? / Malcolm Harper
  • Lessons from the Grameen Bank : entrepreneurialism may not be a universal norm / Rashmi Dyal-Chand
  • Undermining the chances of sustainable development in India with microfinance / Aneel Karnani
  • Impact of microfinance in Croatia / Milford Bateman and Dean Sinković
  • Microfinance in Serbia / Nebojša Janićijević and Goran Petković
  • Microfinance in Macedonia / Taki Fiti, Vladimir Filipovski, and Verica Hadzi Vasileva-Markovska
  • Microfinance saturation in Bosnia and Herzegovina : what has really been achieved for the poor? / Saša Drezgić, Zoran Pavlović, and Dragoljub Stoyanov
  • Gender and microfinance in Southeastern Europe : a critical view / Vesna Cipruš, Liz Hughes, and Mia Vukojević
  • End of microfinance? / Milford Bateman.
This title uses empirical evidence and contributor fieldwork to get at the heart of debates on microfinance claims. It incorporates global perspective but focuses on Southeast Europe, a key arena for microfinance and microcredit programs. Despite the popularity of microfinance, it's a field that remains remarkably under-theorized. Most evaluations carried out by international development agencies, academics, and 'independent' researchers focus on tweaking what they see as an already beneficial system. Rarely are the very foundations of microfinance brought into question. Instead, their studies presuppose impact without evidence, ignore potentially important issues, and utilize faulty evaluation methodologies. Bateman and contributors provide critical perspectives on microfinance that reach beyond the desire for technical perfection held dear by almost all microfinance institutions. It charts actual economic and social impacts registered in Southeast Europe to date, both in the context of post-communist transition and post-conflict reconstruction. It examines key cross-cutting issues, providing a more holistic and comprehensive approach to microfinance. One of the few books available that provides a robust critique of microfinance, "Confronting Microfinance" is sure to fire up the debate on this popular poverty-fighting measure.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781565493421 20160607
Green Library
Book
128 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Journal/Periodical
volumes : illustrations ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
v, 41 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxxi, 298 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • 1. International Monetary System, Energy, and Sustainable Development: An Overview Part 1: International Monetary System Reform 2. The International Monetary System After the Euro Area Sovereign Debt Crisis 3. Issues and Prospects of International Monetary Reforms: East Asian Perspectives 4. Reforming International Monetary System and Internationalization of RMB: a Chinese Perspective 5.The G20 Agenda for More Resilient Global Financial System: Stocktaking and Remaining Challenges Part 2: Increase in Energy and Commodity Price and Volatility 6. Food Price Volatility: What Role for Trade Measures? 7. The Effect of Commodity Price Volatility on G20 Economies 8. EU Commodities Policies and Volatility of World Prices 9. The Global Oil Market: An Outlook from South America Part 3: Green Growth and Sustainable Development 10. Russian Economy as the Hostage of High Oil Prices 11. G20's Roles in Global Green Growth Financing 12. Green Growth and Sustainable Development in G20: Performance and Prospects.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415743921 20160618
Korea was the first non-G7 member and Asian country to host the recent G20 Summit, acting as a bridge between advanced and developing nations. At the G20 Seoul Summit, green growth as well as development and a global financial safety net were on the agenda. Against this backdrop, the aim of this book is to comment on and suggest how to go about setting agendas and shaping further discussions of future summits. The book consists of three major parts: the first part discusses the role of G20 in reforming international monetary system, the status of the IMF since the European sovereign debt crisis, the use of the yuan as the world's reserve currency, and the establishment of a more resilient global financial system. The second part examines trade measures in times of volatile energy prices, the impact of merchandise price volatility on the G20 economies, the EU's pricing policies and the world's price volatility, high oil prices and Russia, and oil markets in South America. The third part reviews G20's financing for green growth, green growth and sustainable development within the G20 framework, and G20's role in addressing climate change and green growth. This book offers an in-depth review of major issues discussed at the recent summits and will be of interest to policy makers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415743921 20160618
Green Library
Book
xiv, 159 pages : ill. ; 22 cm
  • Introduction: Mission-Oriented Finance for Innovation, Mariana Mazzucato and Caetano CR Penna / I: HOW ECONOMISTS GOT IT WRONG - AN ALTERNATIVE DIAGNOSIS / Fast Finance and Slow Growth, Andrew Haldane / The Social Value of Finance: Problems and Solutions, Adair Turner / How Maximising Shareholder Value Stops Innovation, William Lazonick / Dispelling Myths About Government Deficits, L Randall Wray / II: WHAT GOVERNMENTS NEED TO DO TO CREATE REAL LONG-TERM GROWTH / Steering Economies Towards the Next Golden Age, Carlota Perez / Why We Need Public Endowments for Transformative Research, Arun Majumdar / Six Decades of Mission-Oriented Finance for Industrialisation, Technical Change and Innovation in Brazil, Mariano Laplane / Challenges and Opportunities for a Knowledge-Based UK Economy, Vince Cable MP / Why a Fundamental Shift in Innovation Policy is Needed, Tera Allas / III: LEARNING FROM SUCCESS AND FAILURE / Development, Uncertainty, and the Role of State Investment Banks, Luciano Coutinho, Joao Carlos Ferraz and Felipe Silveira Marques / Financing Energy Innovation - the Case of ARPA-E, Cheryl Martin / The Rise of the State Investment Banks, Matthias Kollatz / The European Investment Bank - Supporting Innovation in Europe, Shiva Dustdar / The State as Venture Capitalist - the Case of the Danish Growth Fund, Christian Motzfeldt, / Financing Innovation - Lessons from Innovate UK, Iain Gray / Conclusion: Beyond Market Failures - Shaping and Creating Markets for Innovation-Led Growth, Mariana Mazzucato.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781783484959 20160618
The role of the state in modern capitalism has gone beyond fixing market failures. Those regions and countries that have succeeded in achieving "smart" innovation-led growth have benefited from long-term visionary "mission-oriented" policies-from putting a man on the moon to tackling societal challenges such as climate change and the wellbeing of an ageing population. This book collects the experience of different types of mission-oriented public institutions around the world, together with thought-provoking chapters from leading economists. As the global debate on deficits and debt levels continues to roar, the book offers a challenge to the conventional narrative-asking what kinds of visionary fiscal policies we need to help promote "smart" innovation-led, inclusive, and sustainable growth.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781783484959 20160618
Green Library
Book
ii, 21 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource.
"The World Bank has been publishing estimates of adjusted net or "genuine" saving since 1999. This measure of saving treats depletion of natural resources as a type of economic depreciation. Hamilton uses recent theoretical results relating growth in saving to growth in future consumption to provide a test of genuine saving using historical data. Did measured genuine saving in 1976, for example, "predict" the observed changes in consumption over subsequent decades? The author tests four alternative measures of saving econometrically. The worst measure, in terms of explained variation, is traditional net saving. Genuine saving adjusted to reflect population growth exhibits the worst fit with theory. Both gross saving and genuine saving perform better, with good concordance with theory, while genuine saving exhibits a moderate advantage in terms of goodness of fit. "--World Bank web site.
Book
1 online resource.
With the notable exception of China, in most countries with below-median per capita income the growth rate of the population is greater than that of total wealth. This trend is ultimately unsustainable. For many of these countries, policies for sustainability will require both boosting savings and slowing population growth.
Book
ix, 192 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Preface Introduction Christianism, Nationalism, Economism Economism and the Challenge of Earthism The Marketization of Society The Bretton Woods Institutions The McNamara Years Structural Adjustment A Coherent Opposition The Development Paradigm of the World Bank Can the Bank Change? The Theology of Earthism Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780333730881 20160528
Western society moved from a period in which Christianity was the dominant spiritual force to one of nationalism and then to making the economy the object of public devotion. Today this is challenged by those seeking the health of the Earth including all its inhabitants. The World Bank is the economistic institution most open to Earthist concerns. This book evaluates the Bank's potential for leadership in broadening public goals from narrowly economic goods to inclusive ones.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780333730881 20160528
Green Library
Book
x, 197 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction Part I 1. The Douglas/New Age Texts in Historical Context 2. Douglas/New Age Economics 3. Douglas/New Age Philsophy Part II 4. Orthodox/Neoclassical Reactions 5. The Labour Part and Social Credit 6. Socialism, Labourism and Social Credit Part III 7. The Social Credit Movement to 1930 8. The Social Credit Movement after 1930 9. The Alberta Experiment Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780203029626 20160605
This work approaches the phenomenon of guild socialism from a new perspective, focusing on the Douglas Social Credit movement. It explores the key ideas, gives an overview of the main theories and traces their subsequent history. Thoroughly researched, it provides original material relevant to the field of political economy. This early approach to non-equilibrium economics reveals the extent of the incompatibility between capitalist growth economics and social and environmental sustainability.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780203029626 20160605
Book
xviii, 238 p. ; 22 cm.
The 50th anniversary of the Bretton Woods conference, from which emerged the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, occurs in 1994. Many academics feel that these international financial institutions have done and continue to do more harm than good and should be disbanded. This book pursues this argument providing an analysis of the global economy and offers alternatives to the existing system. The author has compiled a series of provocative essays by leading researchers and activists on three crucial questions: what kind of development should new global economic institutions promote, what are the viable alternatives to the World Bank and IMF and what other global economic institutions are needed to promote a more just trading order with greater social and ecological responsibility.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780745308906 20160527
Green Library
Book
xviii, 183 pages ; 24 cm
  • The sleeping giant has awoken : China's new great leap forward
  • Some of the factors that contributed to China's awakening
  • China's entry into the WTO
  • Why is China interested in Africa?
  • China's foray into Africa : the benefits
  • China's foray into Africa : the criticisms
  • Africa and millions of Chinese migrants
  • How African countries can position themselves to benefit from China's foray into Africa
  • China's foray into Africa : impact on interest of other external players?
  • China and Africa : the way forward and prospects for the future.
Green Library
Book
xviii, 380 p. : ill. (some col.).
  • ch. 1. A brief survey of environmental asset classes
  • ch. 2. Market failures and policy responses
  • ch. 3. Acid rain pollutants as an asset class
  • ch. 4. Greenhouse gas pollutants as an asset class
  • ch. 5. Emerging geographies for greenhouse gas emissions markets
  • ch. 6. Forest carbon as an asset class
  • ch. 7. Clean energy markets and associated asset classes
  • ch. 8. Water markets and associated asset classes
  • ch. 9. Water quality trading and its associated asset classes
  • ch. 10. Sustainable fisheries management and its associated asset classes
  • ch. 11. Weather risks and associated asset classes
  • ch. 12. Sustainability and associated asset classes
  • Conclusion: You can put a price on nature.
A Brief Survey of Environmental Asset Classes; Market Failures and Policy Responses; Acid Rain Pollutants as an Asset Class; Greenhouse Gas Pollutants as an Asset Class; Emerging Geographies for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Markets; Forest Carbon as an Asset Class; Clean Energy Markets and Their Associated Asset Classes; Water Markets and Their Associated Asset Classes; Markets for Water Quality-Nutrient Trading; Sustainable Fisheries Management and Its Associated Asset Classes; Weather Risks and Associated Asset Classes; Sustainability and Associated Asset Classes; Conclusion: You Can Put a Price on Nature; .
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789814612432 20160618

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