%{search_type} search results

86 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
Book
xv, 549 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
An expert on business strategy offers a pragmatic take on how businesses of all sizes balance the competing demands of profitability and employment with sustainability. The demands and stresses on companies only grow as executives face a multitude of competing business goals. Their stakeholders are interested in corporate profits, jobs, business growth, and environmental sustainability. In this book, business strategy expert Yossi Sheffi offers a pragmatic take on how businesses of all sizes-from Coca Cola and Siemens to Dr. Bronner's Magical Soaps and Patagonia-navigate these competing goals. Drawing on extensive interviews with more than 250 executives, Sheffi examines the challenges, solutions, and implications of balancing traditional business goals with sustainability. Sheffi, author of the widely read The Resilient Enterprise, argues that business executives' personal opinions on environmental sustainability are irrelevant. The business merits of environmental sustainability are based on the fact that even the most ardent climate change skeptics in the C-suite face natural resource costs, public relations problems, regulatory burdens, and a green consumer segment. Sheffi presents three basic business rationales for corporate sustainability efforts: cutting costs, reducing risk, and achieving growth. For companies, sustainability is not a simple case of "profits versus planet" but is instead a more subtle issue of (some) people versus (other) people-those looking for jobs and inexpensive goods versus others who seek a pristine environment. This book aims to help companies satisfy these conflicting motivations for both economic growth and environmental sustainability.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262037723 20180521
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (67 pages).
  • 1. Introduction to GSCM and the technology perspective
  • 2. Overview of supply and value chain management
  • 3. Overview of corporate environmental management
  • 3.1 Environmental Management Systems (ISO 14001)
  • 3.2 Life cycle analysis
  • 3.3 Design for the environment and ecodesign
  • 4. Green supply chain management elements and practices
  • 4.1 Green supplier and vendor management
  • 4.1.1 Green supplier selection
  • 4.1.2 Green supplier performance measurement and benchmarking
  • 4.1.3 Green supplier development
  • 4.2 Internal green operations management
  • 4.2.1 Lean and green
  • 4.2.2 Total quality environmental management
  • 4.2.3 Inventory management
  • 4.2.4 Material substitution and process modification
  • 4.2.5 Internal closed loop operations
  • 4.3 Green logistics
  • 4.3.1 Strategic logistics network design
  • 4.3.2 Transportation and delivery management
  • 4.3.3 Green warehousing
  • 4.3.4 Green packaging
  • 4.4 Reverse logistics
  • 5. Management issues for GSCM and GSCM technology
  • 5.1 Business value through cost reduction
  • 5.2 Business value through revenue generation
  • 5.3 Business value through supply chain resilience
  • 5.4 Business value through the license to operate
  • 5.5 Business value through improved reputation and image
  • 5.6 Making the business case
  • 5.7 GSCM technology management
  • 5.7.1 Strategic planning for GSCM technology
  • 5.7.2 GSCM technology assessment
  • 5.7.3 GSCM technology strategic appraisal and justification
  • 5.7.4 GSCM technology implementation
  • 5.7.5 GSCM technology post-implementation management
  • 6. Overview of the GSCM research and theory
  • 7. Conclusion and future directions
  • References.
This monograph focuses on the issues facing sustainability in supply chains. Specifically it provides an overview of green supply chain management (GSCM) and the management of technology within this context. The topics include the operational and technological activities and characteristics of GSCM management. Organizational greening activities that play a role in GSCM operations are presented. The monograph also provides functional activities of the GSCM which include supplier management, internal operations management, logistics, and reverse logistics issues. Managerial considerations related to planning, justifying, and implementing GSCM and the respective technologies provide some insights into management decisions that will be faced in this environment. The references and bibliography provide a dozens of additional readings for those interested in this emergent and complex issue.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781606506547 20180625
Book
xvii, 269 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Business reality reshaped : the big three trends
  • To the desert and back : a brief history of value
  • What would a strategist do?
  • Cool strategies for a heated world
  • Embedded sustainability
  • Hot competencies for a cool world
  • Change management redux
  • One possible pathway from strategy to action
  • Accepting the limits of business as an agent of world benefit
  • The world in 2041 (the story of Jake Marstreng).
We are in the midst of a sea-change. In years past, corporate social responsibility may have been seen as a feather in a corporation's cap but, today, ecological and social pressures require a new type of business response. In "Embedded Sustainability, " authors Chris Laszlo and Nadya Zhexembayeva convincingly show how companies can better leverage global challenges for enduring profit and growth. In this outstanding book, readers will learn about the marquis concept of "embedded sustainability": the incorporation of environmental, health, and social value into core business activities with no trade-off in price or quality. When Clorox introduced its new line of Green Works cleaners or Nissan developed its Leaf 100% electric car, these firms were pursuing a profit shift in mainstream markets. In addition to churning out smarter (instead of just greener) products for consumers at large, embedded sustainability is capable of hugely motivating employees. Most of all, it enables companies to create even higher returns for investors, while responding to the new market realities of declining resources, radical transparency, and rising customer expectations. This book helps readers to comprehend--and act on--the notion of embedded sustainability, explaining why it is now a requisite in every sector, how smart companies are creating even higher value for their customers and investors, and what new management competencies are needed to compete in today's marketplace.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804775540 20160605
Green Library
Book
viii, 135 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction / Kid Schwarz & Bas Steins Bisschop
  • Corporate social responsibility : the standard for 21st century business / Willem Lageweg
  • Towards sustainability : from government to governance / Jacqueline Cramer
  • Sustainable business development : there is no alternative! / André Veneman
  • Cracking the impermeable ceiling of corporate sustainability performance levels / Sybren de Hoo
  • Corporate responsibility, beyond voluntarism : regulatory options to reinforce the license to operate / Jan Eijsbouts.
This book covers the presentations held at the launching event of the Institute for Corporate Law, Governance and Innovation Policies (ICGI) at Maastricht University. The thought provoking presentations were held by three distinguished speakers: Willem Lageweg (Director of MVO Nederland and member of the ICGI Advisory Board), Prof. Dr. Jacqueline Cramer (Director of the Utrecht Sustainability Institute and Professor in Sustainable Innovation at Utrecht University) and Dr. Andre Veneman (Corporate Director Sustainability/Health Safety and Environment at AkzoNobel). In addition to these presentations, the inaugural lectures of Professor Eijsbouts and Professor De Hoo have been updated and are included in the book. This book is of interest not only to legal scholars and practitioners with an interest in the legal challenges brought about by the corporate social responsibility debate, but also for managers of stock quoted- as well as small- and medium sized companies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789462360907 20160613
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (249 pages).
  • Contents and Abstracts1Sustainable Innovation chapter abstractThis chapter defines sustainable innovation, describes the nature of change in markets and industries, and the need to recognize the challenges inherent in and capabilities required for sustainable innovation. Using the evolution of the electric power industry in the 1800s, this chapter introduces the long fuse, big bang framework to describe how industrial change often begins slowly and with great uncertainty until a range of technical, social, economic and political elements are present but uncoordinated, before a small group of innovators, entrepreneurs, policy makers and others trigger a rapid transition to a coordinated state that, in turn, removes uncertainty and attracts and aligns innovative efforts. Further, this chapter demonstrates that sustainability remains, for many industries, on the cusp of such a rapid transition-creating momentary windows of opportunity for companies with the right capabilities to lead sustainable change. 2Betting on Change chapter abstractThis chapter introduces the first capability necessary for leading sustainable innovation: commitment. By defining commitment as a capability, rather than a decision, this chapter recognizes the embedded nature of the activity and its dependence on the particular individuals, structures, norms and values, reward systems, and resources of the organization. The difficulties preventing companies from making long-term commitments are described and explicated through extant theory. Further, this chapter presents a process, the innovation strategy framework, for defining and translating such commitments into a limited and specific set of innovation initiatives that, in turn, illuminate the particular challenges the company will face and capabilities they will need. 3Challenges to Sustainable Innovation chapter abstractThis chapter introduces and describes five significant challenges that define the pursuit of sustainable innovation and, in combination, distinguish such a pursuit from innovation efforts in other sectors (e.g., in smartphone applications, consumer packaged goods, enterprise solutions, ecommerce, etc). These challenges include declining resources-- brownfield markets-- the trade-off between scale, reliability, and profit-- compounding uncertainties-- and the breakthrough bias. Each challenge is described and illustrated with brief examples. 4Nexus Work chapter abstractThis chapter introduces the capability of nexus work, which recognizes the process of constructing coordinated networks from previously incoherent and uncoordinated elements-people, organizations, technologies, policies, and ideas. The resulting networks, driven by a single set of organizing principles, precipitates the big bang introduced in the first chapter and is essential to overcoming the extant industrial networks described in the challenge of innovating in brownfield markets. Using case examples including Edison's role in creating order within the electric industry and Daimler's role in constructing a viable network enabling clean diesel technology, this chapter describes the individuals, activities, and other organizational components of nexus work as a capability. 5Managing Science and Policy chapter abstractThis chapter introduces the ability to recognize the current landscape of relevant science and policies affecting a company's innovation efforts, to predict the evolution of both the science and policy, and even to drive necessary changes in that science and policy in order to enable innovation. Against the challenges of innovating in the face of declining resources and in brownfield systems, particularly, this chapter describes the need for companies to be able to understand, predict, and shape the science and policies that define the competitive landscape. 6Recombinant Innovation chapter abstractThis chapter introduces recombinant innovation as the ability to recognize, adapt and combine the elements of existing solutions into novel offerings that can scale effectively, quickly, and profitably and discusses the role this capability plays in overcoming the challenges of scale, reliability and profitability and of the breakthrough bias. It discusses the organizational activities, structures, and reward systems that constitute recombinant innovation and illustrates these with nodern and historic examples. 7Robust Design chapter abstractThis chapter describes robust design, the ability to employ design in ways that domesticate radical change, reducing resistance and enabling adoption of novel and transformative technologies into brownfield markets and industries. Robust design represents an alternative to design approaches that seek to accentuate the differences between novel products and their competitors. This chapter describes the central role such robust design capabilities played in enabling historic and current innovation efforts. 8Business Model Innovation chapter abstractThis chapter describes business model innovation as the ability of your organization to explore and ultimately construct novel revenue models, distribution channels, value propositions and new relationships with suppliers, partners, distributors, consumers and regulators. Business model innovation develop and deliver new dimensions of value in a company's offerings, reducing reliance on declining resources and isolates new technologies from the limitations that are placed on its performance in order to fit within brownfield systems. 9Conclusion chapter abstractThis chapter summarizes the central premise of the book, that the pursuit of sustainable innovation requires a relatively unique and intentionally constructed set of capabilities which, in turn, are driven by the particular challenges of an organization's innovation strategy. In addition to reviewing these challenges and capabilities, this chapter provides several additional insights gleaned from the research.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804792509 20180611
If we can carry in our pockets more computing power than the Apollo program needed to put a man on the moon, why can't we solve problems like climate change, famine, or poverty? The answer lies, in part, in the distinctive challenges of creating innovations that address today's pressing environmental and social problems. In this groundbreaking book, Andrew Hargadon shows why sustainable innovation-the development of financially viable products that support a healthy environment and communities-is so difficult when compared to creating the next internet ventures or mobile apps that disregard these criteria. While other books treat innovation across sectors equally, Hargadon argues that most effective innovation strategies hinge on attention to the context in which they are pursued. Instead of relying on a stale set of "best practices, " executives must craft their own strategies based on the particulars of their industries and markets. But, there are some rules of the road that foster a triple bottom line; this book provides a research-based framework that outlines the critical capabilities necessary to drive sustainable innovation: a long-term commitment, nexus work, science and policy expertise, recombinant innovation, and robust design. Sustainable Innovation draws on a wide range of historical and contemporary examples to show business readers and their companies how to stand on the shoulders of successful pioneers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804792509 20180611
Book
xii, 236 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Contents and Abstracts1Sustainable Innovation chapter abstractThis chapter defines sustainable innovation, describes the nature of change in markets and industries, and the need to recognize the challenges inherent in and capabilities required for sustainable innovation. Using the evolution of the electric power industry in the 1800s, this chapter introduces the long fuse, big bang framework to describe how industrial change often begins slowly and with great uncertainty until a range of technical, social, economic and political elements are present but uncoordinated, before a small group of innovators, entrepreneurs, policy makers and others trigger a rapid transition to a coordinated state that, in turn, removes uncertainty and attracts and aligns innovative efforts. Further, this chapter demonstrates that sustainability remains, for many industries, on the cusp of such a rapid transition-creating momentary windows of opportunity for companies with the right capabilities to lead sustainable change. 2Betting on Change chapter abstractThis chapter introduces the first capability necessary for leading sustainable innovation: commitment. By defining commitment as a capability, rather than a decision, this chapter recognizes the embedded nature of the activity and its dependence on the particular individuals, structures, norms and values, reward systems, and resources of the organization. The difficulties preventing companies from making long-term commitments are described and explicated through extant theory. Further, this chapter presents a process, the innovation strategy framework, for defining and translating such commitments into a limited and specific set of innovation initiatives that, in turn, illuminate the particular challenges the company will face and capabilities they will need. 3Challenges to Sustainable Innovation chapter abstractThis chapter introduces and describes five significant challenges that define the pursuit of sustainable innovation and, in combination, distinguish such a pursuit from innovation efforts in other sectors (e.g., in smartphone applications, consumer packaged goods, enterprise solutions, ecommerce, etc). These challenges include declining resources-- brownfield markets-- the trade-off between scale, reliability, and profit-- compounding uncertainties-- and the breakthrough bias. Each challenge is described and illustrated with brief examples. 4Nexus Work chapter abstractThis chapter introduces the capability of nexus work, which recognizes the process of constructing coordinated networks from previously incoherent and uncoordinated elements-people, organizations, technologies, policies, and ideas. The resulting networks, driven by a single set of organizing principles, precipitates the big bang introduced in the first chapter and is essential to overcoming the extant industrial networks described in the challenge of innovating in brownfield markets. Using case examples including Edison's role in creating order within the electric industry and Daimler's role in constructing a viable network enabling clean diesel technology, this chapter describes the individuals, activities, and other organizational components of nexus work as a capability. 5Managing Science and Policy chapter abstractThis chapter introduces the ability to recognize the current landscape of relevant science and policies affecting a company's innovation efforts, to predict the evolution of both the science and policy, and even to drive necessary changes in that science and policy in order to enable innovation. Against the challenges of innovating in the face of declining resources and in brownfield systems, particularly, this chapter describes the need for companies to be able to understand, predict, and shape the science and policies that define the competitive landscape. 6Recombinant Innovation chapter abstractThis chapter introduces recombinant innovation as the ability to recognize, adapt and combine the elements of existing solutions into novel offerings that can scale effectively, quickly, and profitably and discusses the role this capability plays in overcoming the challenges of scale, reliability and profitability and of the breakthrough bias. It discusses the organizational activities, structures, and reward systems that constitute recombinant innovation and illustrates these with nodern and historic examples. 7Robust Design chapter abstractThis chapter describes robust design, the ability to employ design in ways that domesticate radical change, reducing resistance and enabling adoption of novel and transformative technologies into brownfield markets and industries. Robust design represents an alternative to design approaches that seek to accentuate the differences between novel products and their competitors. This chapter describes the central role such robust design capabilities played in enabling historic and current innovation efforts. 8Business Model Innovation chapter abstractThis chapter describes business model innovation as the ability of your organization to explore and ultimately construct novel revenue models, distribution channels, value propositions and new relationships with suppliers, partners, distributors, consumers and regulators. Business model innovation develop and deliver new dimensions of value in a company's offerings, reducing reliance on declining resources and isolates new technologies from the limitations that are placed on its performance in order to fit within brownfield systems. 9Conclusion chapter abstractThis chapter summarizes the central premise of the book, that the pursuit of sustainable innovation requires a relatively unique and intentionally constructed set of capabilities which, in turn, are driven by the particular challenges of an organization's innovation strategy. In addition to reviewing these challenges and capabilities, this chapter provides several additional insights gleaned from the research.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804792509 20180611
If we can carry in our pockets more computing power than the Apollo program needed to put a man on the moon, why can't we solve problems like climate change, famine, or poverty? The answer lies, in part, in the distinctive challenges of creating innovations that address today's pressing environmental and social problems. In this groundbreaking book, Andrew Hargadon shows why sustainable innovation-the development of financially viable products that support a healthy environment and communities-is so difficult when compared to creating the next internet ventures or mobile apps that disregard these criteria. While other books treat innovation across sectors equally, Hargadon argues that most effective innovation strategies hinge on attention to the context in which they are pursued. Instead of relying on a stale set of "best practices, " executives must craft their own strategies based on the particulars of their industries and markets. But, there are some rules of the road that foster a triple bottom line; this book provides a research-based framework that outlines the critical capabilities necessary to drive sustainable innovation: a long-term commitment, nexus work, science and policy expertise, recombinant innovation, and robust design. Sustainable Innovation draws on a wide range of historical and contemporary examples to show business readers and their companies how to stand on the shoulders of successful pioneers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804792509 20180611
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (xvii, 243 p.)
  • Leadership : greening from the top
  • Audits : measuring where you are
  • The plan : implementing your sustainability vision
  • Metrics : if you can measure it, you can manage it
  • Design : making it sustainable from the start
  • Facility : making your workplace green
  • Energy : using renewable energy, energy audits, and conservation
  • Carbon : quantifying and reducing your carbon footprint
  • Purchasing : using your dollar to save the planet
  • Reduce : getting to net zero emissions and releases
  • Waste : turning an environmental problem into a business opportunity.
"Street Smart Sustainability" is designed to be a road map to the sustainable low-hanging fruit at a time when the public is hungry for businesses that demonstrate genuine respect for the environment. Individual chapters are designed to act as standalone sets of action steps on particular topics. For example, one chapter will discuss the physical facilities while another challenges the traditional concept of the supply chain. The book includes a chapter on management techniques and one that provides a system of metrics to measure the organization's progress toward sustainability. If you read only the chapter on physical facilities, you'll be equipped to put into effect those recommendations, while preparing for another initiative in another chapter. Most small and medium-sized businesses spend their time operating without the luxury of management depth and outside advisors. They need to operate their businesses while making progressive changes over a period of time. Read the chapter on purchasing, and you may implement those recommendations while managing your enterprise in a day-to-day manner. Do everything in all the chapters, and your organization will become much more sustainable. The book will also include tools that will measure progress and savings.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781605094656 20160614
Book
xxii, 146 pages : portraits ; 22 cm
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (xv, 299 pages) : illustrations.
  • Chapter 1: Introduction Part I: Rethinking Chapter 2: Envisioning a New Way of Doing Business: Thinking Skills for Sustainable Organizations Chapter 3: Transforming Organizations and Society: Learning our Way Forward Part II: Relating Chapter 4: Complex Global Issues as the Context for Value Creation Chapter 5: Managing for Stakeholders in a Complex World Part III: Responding Chapter 6: Sustainability Conversations Chapter 7: Wicked Problems and Complex Processes: The Social Dynamics of Sustainability Chapter 8: From Stakeholder Management to Social Integration: Building Collaboratively Competitive Organizations Part IV: Reinventing Chapter 9: Reconstructing Value: Leadership in Reinventing Notions of Success.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442642768 20180521
Reconstructing Value prepares contemporary business leaders for the increasingly important task of developing a sustainability vision and translating it across levels in an organization. The book is based on insights gained over the past decade from research involving hundreds of practitioners, front line managers to senior executives, who have been working to integrate sustainability within their organizations. It illustrates how building capacity for managing the complex issues of sustainability requires key process skills that leaders need to develop. This book equips readers to respond to the risks and opportunities presented by global sustainability issues and reinvent new ways of doing business that will enhance organizational effectiveness while also building a more sustainable world. Each chapter includes process questions to guide reflective practice and to build the requisite leadership capabilities for turning a sustainability vision into a value-added organizational strategy. Reconstructing Value helps readers to build integrative thinking skills - such as how to engage critical, complexity, strategic and design thinking capabilities to enable organizational change - that can assist them with becoming successful sustainability champions within their organizations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442642768 20180521
Book
xi, 260 p.
  • ch. 1. Taking up the challenge
  • ch. 2. Educating for inquiring practice in sustainability
  • ch. 3. Ideas and practices
  • ch. 4. Promoting alternative questioning, policies and practices in mainstream organisations
  • ch. 5. Establishing sustainability practices in organisations and industries
  • ch. 6. Paying attention to everyday practices of sustainable living
  • ch. 7. Seeking to shift systemic rules and awareness
  • ch. 8. Connecting up stakeholders for more sustainable outcomes
  • ch. 9. Itinerant change agents to professions and sectors
  • ch. 10. Working through community and society
  • ch. 11. Working with young people
  • ch. 12. Reflections.
This book focuses on what it means to take up leadership for sustainability, from a variety of organisational and social positions, and considers the consequences of different strategies and practices for influencing change. Whatever form it takes, organisational sustainability programmes need committed, intelligent, reflective leadership at all levels to make them work. The examples in this book show how people in very different contexts have seized the opportunities open to them and acted with courage and initiative to make a difference. This book will be relevant to a wide range of people, including managers, consultants, and others in commercial, non-profit, public and intergovernmental organisations who want to contribute to the development of a sustainable world. It will be of particular interest to people working in organisations already thinking about issues of sustainability and those who are seeking to take on the role of change agents in organizations or communities. -- taken from back cover.
Book
xxxii, 439 p. ; 23 cm
  • Performance standard one : assessment and management of environmental and social risks and impacts
  • Performance standard two : labour and working conditions
  • Performance standard three : resource efficiency and pollution prevention
  • Performance standard four : community health, safety and security
  • Performance standard five : land acquisition and involuntary resettlement
  • Performance standard six : biodiversity conservation and sustainable management of living natural resources
  • Performance standard seven : indigenous peoples
  • Performance standard eight : cultural heritage.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vii, 256 p.
  • Author's introduction Prologue: Roots and shoots. Early days (Zimbabwe) PART I: AFRICA 1. Divided and united: Investing in change (South Africa) 2. Holism and hope: Towards a SANE society (South Africa) 3. Governance and greed: Accounting for impacts (South Africa) 4. Tears and flowers: Recreating a culture of ethics (Kenya) 5. Friends and foes: Oil on troubled waters (Nigeria) PART II: EUROPE 6. Directives and policies: Eurocrats take on CSR (Belgium) 7. Green and growing: Re-engineering growth (Germany, Austria) 8. Breakdown and breakthrough: Navigating the chaos (Hungary) 9. Partnerships and poverty: New governance for a new world (Switzerland) 10. Cycles and cradles: Faster, further and higher (The Netherlands) PART III: ASIA PACIFIC 11. Kaizen and kyosei: Driving a better future (Japan) 12. Yin and yang: Striving for harmony (China) 13. Too much sun: A slow starter (Australia) 14. Merlions and orang-utans: A new breed of entrepreneurs (Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand) 15. Access and justice: Purpose out of chaos (India) PART IV: THE AMERICAS 16. Mythology and pathology: Unmasking the corporation (Canada) 17. Plantations and houses: The lessons of shared responsibility (Guatemala, Mexico) 18. Emergence and convergence: Birth of a new capitalism (United States) 19. Globalisation and innovation: Redefining growth and progress (United States) 20. Economics and evolution: Barefoot journeys towards abundance (Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, Ecuador) PART IV: THE UNITED KINGDOM 21. Humans and ecology: From New Age to 'new' economics (United Kingdom) 22. Meaning and change: Making a difference (United Kingdom) 23. Research and reading: Landmarks for Sustainability (United Kingdom) 24. Pioneers and paradoxes: In search of sustainable business (United Kingdom) 25. Death and rebirth: From CSR 1.0 to CSR 2.0 (United Kingdom) Epilogue: Smart, shared and sustainable. The alchemical quest.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781907643491 20160612
In January 2010, author, academic and social entrepreneur Dr Wayne Visser set off on a nine-month, 20-country "quest" to talk to entrepreneurs, business leaders and innovators and learn about how companies in all parts of the world can and are helping to tackle the world's most pressing social and environmental problems. His aim was to explore the many varieties of global approaches to sustainable business practices first-hand and to share some of the most innovative global examples. The result is this treasure trove of a book, full of stories, ideas, links to more than 100 video interviews, best practices and tools for making sustainable business work in a myriad of different contexts, cultures and settings. Besides sharing insights from his 2010 "CSR Quest World Tour", the author captures his professional experiences and the evolution of sustainable business over the past 20 years. The path begins in Africa and winds its way through Asia, North America, Europe, Australasia and Latin America. The author shares what he has learned in encounters with mega-corporations and small farmers, and conversations with CEOs and social entrepreneurs. There are facts and figures about world trends, and interviews with thought leaders and activists. This is a tale that consciously weaves the personal and the professional, mixing anecdotes and case studies. It looks outwards and reflects inwards, and is both autobiography and the life story of a global movement.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781907643491 20160612
Book
vii, 256 p.
  • pt. 1. Africa
  • pt. 2. Europe
  • pt. 3. Asia Pacific
  • pt. 4. The Americas
  • pt. 5. The United Kingdom.
Book
422 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
190 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiv, 353 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • 1 Introduction : Corporate Social Responsibility: Ransom for the Corporate Soul 2 Moving from Eco-blind to Eco Icon: Choosing to Move Beyond Ignorance, Tokenism, Moral Panics and Folk Devils 3 Social Responsibility (SR) in the South African Mining Sector: Functional or Dysfunctional? 4 Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development in Brazi 5 Chinese Companies as "Takers" and "Makers" of Sustainable Development and Corporate Social Responsibility in China 6 Embedding Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Business: Strategic and Institutional Perspectives from Bangladesh 7 Corporate Social Responsibility in India: Debates, Developments and Perspectives. 8 Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development: The Case of Chile 9 Corporate Social Responsibility-Whither the Role of Government? 10 Corporate Irresponsibility: The Culpability of Local and Foreign Firms in Corrupt Practices in Nigeria.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498518345 20160619
Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development in Emerging Economies is an anthology of seven case studies plus two theoretical chapters in a comparative context. It analyzes issues related to the rise of multinational corporations, their immense economic and political influence in a globalized world, and their social responsibility/corporate citizenship. Corporate social responsibility is closely examined in terms of meeting the challenges of the widening gap between rich and poor, relationships with sovereign states, environmental degradation, exploitation of natural resources, labor practices, and human rights issues in societies in which multinational corporations operate. Are these corporations exempt from social roles and accountable to only their shareholders (the minimalist position propounded by economists such as Milton Friedman ), or do they also have ethical and social responsibilities to participate in improving the quality of human lives in impoverished societies in Africa , Asia and Latin America?
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498518345 20160619
Green Library
Book
xiv, 255 p. ; 21 cm
  • Évolution du "juste prix" dans la pensée économique -- Prix d'un actif financier -- Cadrage institutionnel -- Pensée unique -- Processus aléatoires -- Structure de financement -- Remplacement du "juste prix" par la "juste valeur" -- Main invisible ou main de l'entrepreneur ? -- Affaiblissement de l'actionnaire -- Gouvernance de la firme -- Réforme des normes comptables -- Influence croissante des intermédiaires financiers -- Épargne forcée -- Économie et lois physiques -- Évaluation des risques -- Soutien public du secteur financier -- Bonne et mauvaise spéculation -- Renaissance des approches participatives -- Rôle des syndicats -- Approches citoyennes -- Rendements croissants et limitations de concurrence -- Changements structurels -- Pouvoir de marché -- Excès des dirigeants -- Comités d'actionnaires -- Gouvernance économique et politique -- Conflits entre le court et le long terme -- Finance comportementale -- Limites des approches partenariales -- Démocratie économique ou écologique ? -- Fonctionnement réel de la démocratie -- Procédures de vote imparfaites -- Intérêt général, somme des intérêts individuels ? -- Asymétries d'information et incitations au partenariat -- Principe de subsidiarité et délégation de décisions -- Responsabilité sociale de la finance -- Dimension sociale -- Options de la politique environnementale et sociale -- Éthique économique et financière -- Évaluation financière de l'environnement -- L'ISR au sens étroit -- L'ISR au sens large -- Estimations empiriques de l'ISR -- Historique de l'investissement socialement responsable -- Critiques de l'ISR -- Problèmes de méthode -- Techniques d'évaluation en question -- Classement par points -- Typologies -- Scénarios -- Sélection normative -- Conflits d'intérêts -- Nouvelles normes, nouveaux standards -- Eco-efficacité -- Codes de conduite -- Normes et standards volontaires -- Normes et standards contraignants -- Insuffisance des contrôles directs -- Politiques environnementales de la finance -- Gestion durable de fortune -- Impôts sur les transactions financières -- Limitation du négoce de produits alimentaires -- Régulation du marché de permis d'émissions de CO2 -- Evolution future du marché carbone -- Marché des dérivés -- Transactions à haute fréquence -- Finance et intérêt général -- Politique financière et environnementale conciliées ? -- Dialogue entre la finance et la Cité.
"La crise financière a conduit les banques à brader une valeur essentielle à leur ban fonctionnement, et dont elles s'étaient jusqu'alors prévalues: la confiance. En développant les investissements socialement responsables au-delà de tout marketing bancaire, celle-ci peut être regagnée. A condition toutefois d'infléchir nombre de pratiques actuellement en vigueur. Pour évaluer une entreprise, l'analyse financière doit se référer au concept de "juste prix", lequel traverse comme un fil rouge toute l'évolution de la pensée économique moderne. Mais le prix estimé n'est "juste" que s'il considère aussi les atteintes à l'environnement et à la cohésion sociale portées par l'entreprise. L'évaluation des risques et des incertitudes ne peut être laissée aux seuls acteurs financiers. A long terme, cette évaluation engage la société civile, et c'est pourquoi une finance partenariale doit être développée. Le renforcement des réformes liées au développement durable est tout aussi impératif que la réduction des risques dus au système financier. Dans cet essai clair et argumenté, Beat Bürgenmeier analyse les différents instruments à disposition pour provoquer un changement de comportements, essentiel et inéluctable, tant il est vrai que la responsabilité de la finance envers les générations futures est pleinement engagée."--P. [4] of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
288 p. : ill., port. ; 24 cm.
  • Case 1: Volvo Strategic action toward sustainable mobility for society Case 2: Suncor Taking stakeholder relations to a new level Case 3: AssiDomn Foresters integrating dual goals of economy and environment Case 4: Patagonia First ascents: finding the way toward quality of life and work (This chapter is available to view on-line. Go to http://www.greenleaf-publishing.com and click on the "Mapping the Journey" cover on our homepage). Case 5: Interface Flooring Systems Driving industrial standards higher Case 6: Sony Operationalising the slogan 'Entertaining the world: caring for the environment' Case 7: ASG Trailblazing toward sustainable logistics and transport Case 8: SC Johnson Eco-Efficiency and beyond Case 9: DaimlerChrysler Redefining cost Case 10: Center of Technology Assessment Pursuing regional approaches to qualitative growth and sustainability Case 11: Henkel Traditional values and ecological leadership Case 12: SJ Rail Turnaround to sustainable transport for the 21st century Case 13: TransAlta New terrain: reducing greenhouse gas emissions Case 14: The Netherlands National Environmental Policy Plan Developing sustainable industrial strategy.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781874719267 20160527
This text presents a series of case studies from around the world based on numerous personal interviews with organizational leaders and focusing on their journeys towards sustainability. The aim is to provide visions of a more sustainable future, and to shed light on the path, milestones and solutions - in particular the management processes these organizations employed - to provide a compass that others can follow. Although each organization must take steps to fit its particular circumstance, business conditions and culture, the book seeks to prove that valuable lessons can be learned by setting aside critique as to where these organizations may yet make progress and instead focusing on the guidelines, targets, measures of success, tools and techniques and wisdom about how pioneer organizations are travelling towards a prosperous, sustainable future. The organizations featured include: Sony Corporation; SC Johnson; TransAlta Corporation; Henkel; Volvo; Interface Flooring Systems; DaimlerChrysler; ASG; and the Dutch National Environmental Policy Plan.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781874719267 20160527
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 56 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

Articles+

Journal articles, e-books, & other e-resources
Articles+ results include