%{search_type} search results

34 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
Book
xvii, 269 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Business reality reshaped : the big three trends
  • To the desert and back : a brief history of value
  • What would a strategist do?
  • Cool strategies for a heated world
  • Embedded sustainability
  • Hot competencies for a cool world
  • Change management redux
  • One possible pathway from strategy to action
  • Accepting the limits of business as an agent of world benefit
  • The world in 2041 (the story of Jake Marstreng).
We are in the midst of a sea-change. In years past, corporate social responsibility may have been seen as a feather in a corporation's cap but, today, ecological and social pressures require a new type of business response. In "Embedded Sustainability, " authors Chris Laszlo and Nadya Zhexembayeva convincingly show how companies can better leverage global challenges for enduring profit and growth. In this outstanding book, readers will learn about the marquis concept of "embedded sustainability": the incorporation of environmental, health, and social value into core business activities with no trade-off in price or quality. When Clorox introduced its new line of Green Works cleaners or Nissan developed its Leaf 100% electric car, these firms were pursuing a profit shift in mainstream markets. In addition to churning out smarter (instead of just greener) products for consumers at large, embedded sustainability is capable of hugely motivating employees. Most of all, it enables companies to create even higher returns for investors, while responding to the new market realities of declining resources, radical transparency, and rising customer expectations. This book helps readers to comprehend--and act on--the notion of embedded sustainability, explaining why it is now a requisite in every sector, how smart companies are creating even higher value for their customers and investors, and what new management competencies are needed to compete in today's marketplace.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804775540 20160605
Green Library
Book
xii, 236 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Contents and Abstracts1Sustainable Innovation chapter abstractThis chapter defines sustainable innovation, describes the nature of change in markets and industries, and the need to recognize the challenges inherent in and capabilities required for sustainable innovation. Using the evolution of the electric power industry in the 1800s, this chapter introduces the long fuse, big bang framework to describe how industrial change often begins slowly and with great uncertainty until a range of technical, social, economic and political elements are present but uncoordinated, before a small group of innovators, entrepreneurs, policy makers and others trigger a rapid transition to a coordinated state that, in turn, removes uncertainty and attracts and aligns innovative efforts. Further, this chapter demonstrates that sustainability remains, for many industries, on the cusp of such a rapid transition-creating momentary windows of opportunity for companies with the right capabilities to lead sustainable change. 2Betting on Change chapter abstractThis chapter introduces the first capability necessary for leading sustainable innovation: commitment. By defining commitment as a capability, rather than a decision, this chapter recognizes the embedded nature of the activity and its dependence on the particular individuals, structures, norms and values, reward systems, and resources of the organization. The difficulties preventing companies from making long-term commitments are described and explicated through extant theory. Further, this chapter presents a process, the innovation strategy framework, for defining and translating such commitments into a limited and specific set of innovation initiatives that, in turn, illuminate the particular challenges the company will face and capabilities they will need. 3Challenges to Sustainable Innovation chapter abstractThis chapter introduces and describes five significant challenges that define the pursuit of sustainable innovation and, in combination, distinguish such a pursuit from innovation efforts in other sectors (e.g., in smartphone applications, consumer packaged goods, enterprise solutions, ecommerce, etc). These challenges include declining resources-- brownfield markets-- the trade-off between scale, reliability, and profit-- compounding uncertainties-- and the breakthrough bias. Each challenge is described and illustrated with brief examples. 4Nexus Work chapter abstractThis chapter introduces the capability of nexus work, which recognizes the process of constructing coordinated networks from previously incoherent and uncoordinated elements-people, organizations, technologies, policies, and ideas. The resulting networks, driven by a single set of organizing principles, precipitates the big bang introduced in the first chapter and is essential to overcoming the extant industrial networks described in the challenge of innovating in brownfield markets. Using case examples including Edison's role in creating order within the electric industry and Daimler's role in constructing a viable network enabling clean diesel technology, this chapter describes the individuals, activities, and other organizational components of nexus work as a capability. 5Managing Science and Policy chapter abstractThis chapter introduces the ability to recognize the current landscape of relevant science and policies affecting a company's innovation efforts, to predict the evolution of both the science and policy, and even to drive necessary changes in that science and policy in order to enable innovation. Against the challenges of innovating in the face of declining resources and in brownfield systems, particularly, this chapter describes the need for companies to be able to understand, predict, and shape the science and policies that define the competitive landscape. 6Recombinant Innovation chapter abstractThis chapter introduces recombinant innovation as the ability to recognize, adapt and combine the elements of existing solutions into novel offerings that can scale effectively, quickly, and profitably and discusses the role this capability plays in overcoming the challenges of scale, reliability and profitability and of the breakthrough bias. It discusses the organizational activities, structures, and reward systems that constitute recombinant innovation and illustrates these with nodern and historic examples. 7Robust Design chapter abstractThis chapter describes robust design, the ability to employ design in ways that domesticate radical change, reducing resistance and enabling adoption of novel and transformative technologies into brownfield markets and industries. Robust design represents an alternative to design approaches that seek to accentuate the differences between novel products and their competitors. This chapter describes the central role such robust design capabilities played in enabling historic and current innovation efforts. 8Business Model Innovation chapter abstractThis chapter describes business model innovation as the ability of your organization to explore and ultimately construct novel revenue models, distribution channels, value propositions and new relationships with suppliers, partners, distributors, consumers and regulators. Business model innovation develop and deliver new dimensions of value in a company's offerings, reducing reliance on declining resources and isolates new technologies from the limitations that are placed on its performance in order to fit within brownfield systems. 9Conclusion chapter abstractThis chapter summarizes the central premise of the book, that the pursuit of sustainable innovation requires a relatively unique and intentionally constructed set of capabilities which, in turn, are driven by the particular challenges of an organization's innovation strategy. In addition to reviewing these challenges and capabilities, this chapter provides several additional insights gleaned from the research.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804792509 20180611
If we can carry in our pockets more computing power than the Apollo program needed to put a man on the moon, why can't we solve problems like climate change, famine, or poverty? The answer lies, in part, in the distinctive challenges of creating innovations that address today's pressing environmental and social problems. In this groundbreaking book, Andrew Hargadon shows why sustainable innovation-the development of financially viable products that support a healthy environment and communities-is so difficult when compared to creating the next internet ventures or mobile apps that disregard these criteria. While other books treat innovation across sectors equally, Hargadon argues that most effective innovation strategies hinge on attention to the context in which they are pursued. Instead of relying on a stale set of "best practices, " executives must craft their own strategies based on the particulars of their industries and markets. But, there are some rules of the road that foster a triple bottom line; this book provides a research-based framework that outlines the critical capabilities necessary to drive sustainable innovation: a long-term commitment, nexus work, science and policy expertise, recombinant innovation, and robust design. Sustainable Innovation draws on a wide range of historical and contemporary examples to show business readers and their companies how to stand on the shoulders of successful pioneers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804792509 20180611
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (249 pages).
  • Contents and Abstracts1Sustainable Innovation chapter abstractThis chapter defines sustainable innovation, describes the nature of change in markets and industries, and the need to recognize the challenges inherent in and capabilities required for sustainable innovation. Using the evolution of the electric power industry in the 1800s, this chapter introduces the long fuse, big bang framework to describe how industrial change often begins slowly and with great uncertainty until a range of technical, social, economic and political elements are present but uncoordinated, before a small group of innovators, entrepreneurs, policy makers and others trigger a rapid transition to a coordinated state that, in turn, removes uncertainty and attracts and aligns innovative efforts. Further, this chapter demonstrates that sustainability remains, for many industries, on the cusp of such a rapid transition-creating momentary windows of opportunity for companies with the right capabilities to lead sustainable change. 2Betting on Change chapter abstractThis chapter introduces the first capability necessary for leading sustainable innovation: commitment. By defining commitment as a capability, rather than a decision, this chapter recognizes the embedded nature of the activity and its dependence on the particular individuals, structures, norms and values, reward systems, and resources of the organization. The difficulties preventing companies from making long-term commitments are described and explicated through extant theory. Further, this chapter presents a process, the innovation strategy framework, for defining and translating such commitments into a limited and specific set of innovation initiatives that, in turn, illuminate the particular challenges the company will face and capabilities they will need. 3Challenges to Sustainable Innovation chapter abstractThis chapter introduces and describes five significant challenges that define the pursuit of sustainable innovation and, in combination, distinguish such a pursuit from innovation efforts in other sectors (e.g., in smartphone applications, consumer packaged goods, enterprise solutions, ecommerce, etc). These challenges include declining resources-- brownfield markets-- the trade-off between scale, reliability, and profit-- compounding uncertainties-- and the breakthrough bias. Each challenge is described and illustrated with brief examples. 4Nexus Work chapter abstractThis chapter introduces the capability of nexus work, which recognizes the process of constructing coordinated networks from previously incoherent and uncoordinated elements-people, organizations, technologies, policies, and ideas. The resulting networks, driven by a single set of organizing principles, precipitates the big bang introduced in the first chapter and is essential to overcoming the extant industrial networks described in the challenge of innovating in brownfield markets. Using case examples including Edison's role in creating order within the electric industry and Daimler's role in constructing a viable network enabling clean diesel technology, this chapter describes the individuals, activities, and other organizational components of nexus work as a capability. 5Managing Science and Policy chapter abstractThis chapter introduces the ability to recognize the current landscape of relevant science and policies affecting a company's innovation efforts, to predict the evolution of both the science and policy, and even to drive necessary changes in that science and policy in order to enable innovation. Against the challenges of innovating in the face of declining resources and in brownfield systems, particularly, this chapter describes the need for companies to be able to understand, predict, and shape the science and policies that define the competitive landscape. 6Recombinant Innovation chapter abstractThis chapter introduces recombinant innovation as the ability to recognize, adapt and combine the elements of existing solutions into novel offerings that can scale effectively, quickly, and profitably and discusses the role this capability plays in overcoming the challenges of scale, reliability and profitability and of the breakthrough bias. It discusses the organizational activities, structures, and reward systems that constitute recombinant innovation and illustrates these with nodern and historic examples. 7Robust Design chapter abstractThis chapter describes robust design, the ability to employ design in ways that domesticate radical change, reducing resistance and enabling adoption of novel and transformative technologies into brownfield markets and industries. Robust design represents an alternative to design approaches that seek to accentuate the differences between novel products and their competitors. This chapter describes the central role such robust design capabilities played in enabling historic and current innovation efforts. 8Business Model Innovation chapter abstractThis chapter describes business model innovation as the ability of your organization to explore and ultimately construct novel revenue models, distribution channels, value propositions and new relationships with suppliers, partners, distributors, consumers and regulators. Business model innovation develop and deliver new dimensions of value in a company's offerings, reducing reliance on declining resources and isolates new technologies from the limitations that are placed on its performance in order to fit within brownfield systems. 9Conclusion chapter abstractThis chapter summarizes the central premise of the book, that the pursuit of sustainable innovation requires a relatively unique and intentionally constructed set of capabilities which, in turn, are driven by the particular challenges of an organization's innovation strategy. In addition to reviewing these challenges and capabilities, this chapter provides several additional insights gleaned from the research.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804792509 20180611
If we can carry in our pockets more computing power than the Apollo program needed to put a man on the moon, why can't we solve problems like climate change, famine, or poverty? The answer lies, in part, in the distinctive challenges of creating innovations that address today's pressing environmental and social problems. In this groundbreaking book, Andrew Hargadon shows why sustainable innovation-the development of financially viable products that support a healthy environment and communities-is so difficult when compared to creating the next internet ventures or mobile apps that disregard these criteria. While other books treat innovation across sectors equally, Hargadon argues that most effective innovation strategies hinge on attention to the context in which they are pursued. Instead of relying on a stale set of "best practices, " executives must craft their own strategies based on the particulars of their industries and markets. But, there are some rules of the road that foster a triple bottom line; this book provides a research-based framework that outlines the critical capabilities necessary to drive sustainable innovation: a long-term commitment, nexus work, science and policy expertise, recombinant innovation, and robust design. Sustainable Innovation draws on a wide range of historical and contemporary examples to show business readers and their companies how to stand on the shoulders of successful pioneers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804792509 20180611
Book
xii, 308 p. : ill., map.
Book
209, [1] p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource (xvi, 143 pages) : illustrations.
Book
vii, 275 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xx, 364 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
"If you miss this book you may miss the boat" - Ernst Ulrich von Weizs cker, President of Wuppertal Institute for Climate Environment & Energy This is a book about innovation. Innovation which is fuelled by ecological issues. Innovation which will enable you to save time, resources, money and improve your performance for new business development. It spells out the meaning of vital trends which will shake up your business over the coming decades. Driving Eco-Innovation provides an insight into why business is losing its innovation stamina. It gives you the nuts and bolts of the eco-innovation approach and enables you to carry out your own, hands-on experiments and, ultimately, provide products and services that are environmentally efficient and economically profitable. Authors : Claude Fussler is vice president of Environmental Health & Safety, New Business & Public Affairs, Dow Europe. In 1995 he receivedTomorrow Magazine's Environmental Leadership Award. Peter James is director of the Sustainable Business Centre. He is also an Associate of Ashridge Management College.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780273622079 20160527
Green Library
Book
xx, 320 p. : ill ; 25 cm.
This book is for those who want their company to prevail in the coming post-petroleum era. Using charts, diagrams, tables, and checklists, the book's principal aim is to make understandable to senior and middle managers issues surrounding the search for sustainable development - and the central role business organizations of every kind can play in the search for new and appropriate solutions. Vitality and Renewal is appropriate for any manager eager to provide 21st century leadership within his or her sphere of influence. It is also appropriate for those working as agents of change in consulting and training as well as environmental organizations which face their own challenges as awareness of the predicament grows.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780275952341 20160610
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vii, 194 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
A book aimed at business managers and others responsible for redirecting business activities to take account of the needs of our threatened planet and dwindling resources, while defining the commercial interests involved. Existing and proposed guidelines in environmental management are covered.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789221072898 20160605
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxi, 633 p. : ill.
  • section 1. Business models, regulation and standard for sustainability
  • section 2. Green ICT for sustainability
  • section 3. Green finance and carbon market
  • section 4. Green manufacturing, logistics and SCM
  • section 5. Regional development.
"This book is devoted to examining a range of issues concerning green finance and sustainability covering sections on emerging environmentally aware business models, regulation and standard development, green ICT for sustainability, green finance and the carbon market, green manufacturing, logistics and SCM, and regional low carbon development"--Provided by publisher.
Book
xxi, 633 p. : ill.
  • section 1. Business models, regulation and standard for sustainability
  • section 2. Green ICT for sustainability
  • section 3. Green finance and carbon market
  • section 4. Green manufacturing, logistics and SCM
  • section 5. Regional development.
"This book is devoted to examining a range of issues concerning green finance and sustainability covering sections on emerging environmentally aware business models, regulation and standard development, green ICT for sustainability, green finance and the carbon market, green manufacturing, logistics and SCM, and regional low carbon development"--Provided by publisher.
Book
xiii, 255 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Corporate Environmental Challenges of the 21st Century-- 2. Sustainable Development and Sustainable Corporations-- 3. Global Environmental Competitiveness and Quality -- 4. Ethical and Political Imperatives for Greening-- 5. Missionary Greening: The Body Shop-- 6. The Systems Approach: Procter and Gamble, Inc.-- 7. Green Trading: Loblaw International Merchants, Inc.-- 8. Organic Greening: Ben and Jerry's Homemade Ice Creams Inc.-- 9. Rational Pragmatic Greening: The Volvo Car Company-- 10. Cost Effective Green Technologies: The 3M Company -- 11. Green Japan, Inc.-- 12. Greening Vision, Inputs, Throughputs and Outputs-- 13. Green Hand Tools and Processes-- 14. Towards Second Order Greenings: The Bioregionally Sustainable Multinational Corporation.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780538844529 20160615
This volume provides a practical approach to greening a business. Case studies are featured of six companies that have been successful in conforming to environmental standards and yet still make expected profits. Graphics, tables and models present strategies for environmental management.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780538844529 20160615
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 102 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
38 p. ; 30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 251 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Part I Approaching institutional change and policy learning: conceptions of institutions and policy learning-- operationalizing learning. Part II Case studies in institutional change: environmental policy in the European Union-- sustainable management of natural and physical resources - the New Zealand Resource Management Act 1991-- national councils for sustainable development - experiments in national policy development and integration-- strategic environmental assessment - policy integration as practice ot possibility?-- property rights instruments - transformative policy options. Part III Conclusions: principles and elements of institutional change for sustainable development.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781843765691 20160527
This volume presents a flexible conceptual framework for comprehending institutional dimensions of sustainability, emphasising the complexity of instututional systems, and highlighting the interdependence between policy learning and institutional change. This framework is applied and developed through the analysis of five significant arenas of institutional and policy change: environmental policy in the EU; New Zealand's Councils for Sustainable Development Act; and transformative property rights instruments. From these explorations, key principles for insitutional change are identified, including the institutional change; reiteration and learning; integration in policy and practice; subsidarity; and legal change.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781843765691 20160527
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 278 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Focusing on the changing role of business in society, this collection of 21 articles from the World Business Academy's journal discusses the new role of business, and socio-economic problems facing its evolution from a generator of wealth to a globaly influential institution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781576750186 20160609
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource (128 pages) : illustrations (chiefly color)
Book
1 online resource (323 pages)
  • Preface xiii PART 1 INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABILITY 1 1. Urgency to Adopt Sustainability 3 2. Development of the Sustainability Concept and CSR 17 PART 2 SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGIES 25 3. The CERES and Other Principles 27 4. The Natural Step 39 5. Eco-effective Versus Eco-efficient: Sustainability Versus Being "Less Bad" 55 6. Extended Product Responsibility and "Servicizing" 65 7. Systems Thinking Leads to "Tunneling Through the Cost Barrier" 79 8. E nvironmental Innovation Through Biomimicry 89 9. Base of the Pyramid 107 10. Sustaining Fisheries 119 11. Environmentally Effective Buildings 131 12. Green Chemistry, Nanotechnology, and "Big Hairy Audacious Goal" 145 13. Sustainable Strategies and Beyond 159 PART 3 TOOLS AND METRICS 161 14. Standards and Guidelines for Managing Corporate Social Responsibility towards Sustainability 163 15. The Corporation and Its Stakeholders 177 16. Sustainability Reporting 189 17. Metrics for Sustainability 199 18. Life Cycle Analysis and Carbon Footprint 217 19. Water Footprint 227 20. Green Marketing, Communication, and Greenwashing 235 Part 4 Conclusion 247 21. Epilogue: Where Do We Go Now? 249 References 251 Appendix Additional Case Studies for a Practical Understanding of Sustainability 253 Index 291.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118250440 20180530
Practical Sustainability Strategies: How to Gain a Competitive Advantage provides more than ten sustainable strategies and tools that can be implemented by organizations to improve their competitive business advantage, while also providing a positive impact to the community and workplace. This vital book for R&D chemists and engineers and process designers provides economic justification of sustainability with examples. Case studies based on the authors' vast experience with many leading companies illustrate each sustainable strategy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118250440 20180530
Book
153 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
  • Zwischen Authentizität und Inszenierung
  • Die lästigen Enthusiasten : Gespräche über den Versuch, Nachhaltigkeit in großen Unternehmen zu verankern
  • Mit Authentizität zum Erfolg : Unternehmer mit Herz, Hirn und Verantwortung : Unternehmer sehr persönlich
  • Anstelle eines Nachworts
  • Die Autoren.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

Articles+

Journal articles, e-books, & other e-resources
Articles+ results include