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1. After extinction [2018]

Book
1 online resource.
  • Contents Introduction Richard Grusin 1. Extinction Events and Entangled Humanism William E. Connolly 2. Planetary Memories: After Extinction, the Imagined Future Jussi Parikka 3. Photography after Extinction Joanna Zylinska 4. The Six Extinctions: Visualizing Planetary Ecological Crisis Today Joseph Masco 5. Condors at the End of the World Cary Wolfe 6. It's Not the Anthropocene, It's the White Supremacy Scene-- or, the Geological Color Line Nicholas Mirzoeff 7. Lives Worth Living: Extinction, Persons, Disability Claire Colebrook 8. Biocapitalism and De-extinction Ashley Dawson 9. Surviving the Sixth Extinction: American Indian Strategies for Life in the New World Daryl Baldwin, Margaret Noodin, and Bernard C. Perley Acknowledgments Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781517902896 20180514
A multidisciplinary exploration of extinction and what comes next What comes after extinction? Including both prominent and unusual voices in current debates around the Anthropocene, this collection asks authors from diverse backgrounds to address this question. After Extinction looks at the future of humans and nonhumans, exploring how the scale of risk posed by extinction has changed in light of the accelerated networks of the twenty-first century. The collection considers extinction as a cultural, artistic, and media event as well as a biological one. The authors treat extinction in relation to a variety of topics, including disability, human exceptionalism, science-fiction understandings of time and posthistory, photography, the contemporary ecological crisis, the California Condor, systemic racism, Native American traditions, and capitalism.From discussions of the anticipated sixth extinction to the status of writing, theory, and philosophy after extinction, the contributions of this volume are insightful and innovative, timely and thought provoking. Contributors: Daryl Baldwin, Miami U; Claire Colebrook, Pennsylvania State U; William E. Connolly, Johns Hopkins U; Ashley Dawson, CUNY Graduate Center; Joseph Masco, U of Chicago; Nicholas Mirzoeff, New York U; Margaret Noodin, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Jussi Parikka, U of Southampton; Bernard C. Perley, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Cary Wolfe, Rice U; Joanna Zylinska, Goldsmiths, U of London.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781517902896 20180514

2. After extinction [2018]

Book
xix, 244 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
  • Contents Introduction Richard Grusin 1. Extinction Events and Entangled Humanism William E. Connolly 2. Planetary Memories: After Extinction, the Imagined Future Jussi Parikka 3. Photography after Extinction Joanna Zylinska 4. The Six Extinctions: Visualizing Planetary Ecological Crisis Today Joseph Masco 5. Condors at the End of the World Cary Wolfe 6. It's Not the Anthropocene, It's the White Supremacy Scene-- or, the Geological Color Line Nicholas Mirzoeff 7. Lives Worth Living: Extinction, Persons, Disability Claire Colebrook 8. Biocapitalism and De-extinction Ashley Dawson 9. Surviving the Sixth Extinction: American Indian Strategies for Life in the New World Daryl Baldwin, Margaret Noodin, and Bernard C. Perley Acknowledgments Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781517902896 20180514
A multidisciplinary exploration of extinction and what comes next What comes after extinction? Including both prominent and unusual voices in current debates around the Anthropocene, this collection asks authors from diverse backgrounds to address this question. After Extinction looks at the future of humans and nonhumans, exploring how the scale of risk posed by extinction has changed in light of the accelerated networks of the twenty-first century. The collection considers extinction as a cultural, artistic, and media event as well as a biological one. The authors treat extinction in relation to a variety of topics, including disability, human exceptionalism, science-fiction understandings of time and posthistory, photography, the contemporary ecological crisis, the California Condor, systemic racism, Native American traditions, and capitalism.From discussions of the anticipated sixth extinction to the status of writing, theory, and philosophy after extinction, the contributions of this volume are insightful and innovative, timely and thought provoking. Contributors: Daryl Baldwin, Miami U; Claire Colebrook, Pennsylvania State U; William E. Connolly, Johns Hopkins U; Ashley Dawson, CUNY Graduate Center; Joseph Masco, U of Chicago; Nicholas Mirzoeff, New York U; Margaret Noodin, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Jussi Parikka, U of Southampton; Bernard C. Perley, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Cary Wolfe, Rice U; Joanna Zylinska, Goldsmiths, U of London.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781517902896 20180514
Green Library
Book
xxii, 183 pages : illustrations ; 18 cm.
  • Origins
  • Earth system
  • Geologic time
  • The great acceleration
  • Anthropos
  • Oikos
  • Politikos
  • Prometheus.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
256 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction 1. Climate turmoil: introducing a socioecological model of human action, environmental impact, and mounting vulnerability 2. The emergence and maturation of the anthropology of climate change 3. The archaeology of climate change 4. Theoretical perspectives in the anthropology of climate change 5. Case studies in the anthropology of climate change 6. Applications of anthropological research on climate change 7. What are other social scientists saying about climate change 8. Conclusion: toward a critical integrated social science of climate change.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138574847 20180618
In addressing the urgent questions raised by climate change, this book provides a comprehensive overview of the anthropology of climate change, guided by a critical political ecological framework. It examines the emergence and slow maturation of the anthropology of climate change, reviews the historic foundations for this work in the archaeology of climate change, and presents three alternative contemporary theoretical perspectives in the anthropology of climate change. This second edition is fully updated to include the most recent literature published since the first edition in 2014. It also examines a number of new topics, including an analysis of the 2014 American Anthropological Association's Global Climate Change Task Force report, a new case study on responses to climate change in developed societies, and reference to the stance of the Trump administration on climate change. Not only does this book provide a valuable overview of the field and the key literature, but it also gives researchers and students in Environmental Anthropology, Climate Change, Human Geography, Sociology, and Political Science a novel framework for understanding climate change that emphasizes human socioecological interactions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138574847 20180618
Green Library
Book
xv, 340 pages ; 25 cm
  • Preface: On Losing Your Children in the Vatican ixAcknowledgments xiii1 The Conundrum of the Absolute 1The Pagan 172 Nature Before Nature 193 The Natural Conscience 474 Pagan Monotheism and the Two Evils 77The Bourgeois 1075 Why Jesus Never Talked about Farming 1096 Great Departures 1487 Electrum Faiths 180The Good 2178 Nonpolitical Politics 2199 Awesome Coolness 23710 The Jewel of Truth 259Notes 279References 311Index 325.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691165097 20180312
How faith, the natural world, and community can provide complementary paths for leading a good life People have long looked to nature and the divine as paths to the good. In this panoramic meditation on the harmonious life, Michael Mayerfeld Bell traces how these two paths came to be seen as separate from human ways, and how many of today's conflicts can be traced back thousands of years to this ancient divide. Taking readers on a spellbinding journey through history and across the globe, Bell begins with the pagan view, which sees nature and the divine as entangled with the human--and not necessarily good. But the emergence of urban societies gave rise to new moral concerns about the political character of human life. Wealth and inequality grew, and urban people sought to justify their passions. In the face of such concerns, nature and the divine came to be partitioned from the human, and therefore seen to be good--but they also became absolute and divisive. Bell charts the unfolding of this new moral imagination in the rise of Buddhism, Christianity, Daoism, Hinduism, Jainism, and many other traditions that emerged with bourgeois life. He follows developments in moral thought, from the religions of the ancient Sumerians, Greeks, and Hebrews to the science and environmentalism of today, along the way visiting with contemporary indigenous people in South Africa, Costa Rica, and the United States. City of the Good urges us to embrace the plurality of our traditions--from the pagan to the bourgeois--and to guard against absolutism and remain open to difference and its endless creativity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691165097 20180312
Green Library
Book
1 online resource.
  • 1. Introduction: materializing climate-- 2. Assembling the Anthropocene-- 3. On soils, stones, and social relationships of geophysical history-- 4. On glaciers and grass and weather and welfare-- 5. Social welfare without the Anthropocene's nature-- 6. Conclusion: toward a critical anthropology of global warming.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781108534376 20180409
This book offers a critical reading of the Anthropocene that draws on archaeological, ecological, geological, and ethnographic evidence to argue that the concept reproduces the modernist binary between society and nature, and forecloses a more inclusive politics around climate change. The authors challenge the divisions between humans as biological and geophysical agents that constitute the ontological foundations of the period. Building on contemporary critiques of capitalism, they examine different conceptions of human-environment relationships derived from anthropology to engage with the pressing problem of global warming.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781108534376 20180409
Book
xvi, 167 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • 1. Introduction: materializing climate-- 2. Assembling the Anthropocene-- 3. On soils, stones, and social relationships of geophysical history-- 4. On glaciers and grass and weather and welfare-- 5. Social welfare without the Anthropocene's nature-- 6. Conclusion: toward a critical anthropology of global warming.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781108423243 20180423
This book offers a critical reading of the Anthropocene that draws on archaeological, ecological, geological, and ethnographic evidence to argue that the concept reproduces the modernist binary between society and nature, and forecloses a more inclusive politics around climate change. The authors challenge the divisions between humans as biological and geophysical agents that constitute the ontological foundations of the period. Building on contemporary critiques of capitalism, they examine different conceptions of human-environment relationships derived from anthropology to engage with the pressing problem of global warming.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781108423243 20180423
Green Library
Book
xxvii, 848 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Green Library
Book
xvii, 248 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.
  • Series Introduction Katriina Soini and Joost Dessein Introduction to culture, sustainability and the environmental realm Constanza Parra, Inger Birkeland, Rob Burton, Katriina Siivonen PART 1: Livelihoods, cultures and practices 1. Sustainable Everyday Culture From Glocal Archipelago Culture Katriina Siivonen 2. Cultivating Cultural Sustainability in Farming Practices Katriina Soini, Suvi Huttunen 3. What can Culture in and for Sustainable Development Learn from Protected Areas? Constanza Parra 4. Culturally Sensitive Agricultures and Biocultural Diversity Claudia Brites, Pedro Mendes Moreira 5. A Matter of Context and Balance. Pre-industrial Conceptualizations of Sustainability Vidar Hreinsson 6. Roots and wings. Creativity and the Nature-Culture Interface Annalisa Cicerchia PART 2: Planning and policies for cultural sustainability 7. Landscape Co-Management Practices and Power Structures in the UNESCO World Heritage Site Wachau, Austria Katharina Gugerell, Marianne Penker, Pia Kieninger 8. Adaptation and Cultural Sustainability of the Winter-Seining Community in the Archipelago of Southwestern Finland Kirsi Sonck-Rautio 9. Preserving Cultural Landscapes: A Cultural Sustainability Perspective Rob J.F. Burton 10. Terraced Landscapes: The Significance of a Living Agricultural Heritage Bettina Scharrer, Thomas Hammer, Marion Leng 11. Tourism and Sustainable Development in Rural Communities in the Black Sea Coastline Miroslav Tascu-Stavre 12. World Heritage and Cultural Sustainability: Farmers and Fishermen at Vega, Northern Norway Karoline Daugstad, Knut Fageraas PART 3: Methodologies for cultural sustainability 13. Narratives, Capabilities and Climate Change: Towards a Sustainable Culture Nathalie Blanc, Lydie Laigle 14. Artistic Actions for Sustainability in Contemporary Art Exhibition Asthildur Jonsdottir, Chrystalla Antoniou 15. Media Aesthetic Methodologies: Analyzing Media-Stories of Nature and Wild Life Nina Svane-Mikkelsen.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138650497 20180514
As contemporary socio-ecological challenges such as climate change and biodiversity preservation have become more important, the three pillars concept has increasingly been used in planning and policy circles as a framework for analysis and action. However, the issue of how culture influences sustainability is still an underexplored theme. Understanding how culture can act as a resource to promote sustainability, rather than a barrier, is the key to the development of cultural sustainability. This book explores the interfaces between nature and culture through the perspective of cultural sustainability. A cultural perspective on environmental sustainability enables a renewal of sustainability discourse and practices across rural and urban landscapes, natural and cultural systems, stressing heterogeneity and complexity. The book focuses on the nature-culture interface conceptualised as a place where experiences, practices, policies, ideas and knowledge meet, are negotiated, discussed and resolved. Rather than looking for lost unities, or an imaginary view of harmonious relationships between humans and nature based in the past, it explores cases of interfaces that are context-sensitive and which consciously convey the problems of scale and time. While calling attention to a cultural or `culturalised' view of the sustainability debate, this book questions the radical nature-culture dualism dominating positive modern thinking as well as its underlying view of nature as pre-given and independent from human life.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138650497 20180514
Green Library
Book
ix, 210 pages ; 25 cm
Explores the complex ethical dilemmas of human mobility in the context of climate changeCurrently, adaptation policy for climate change prioritises economic and technological dimensions of governance and action. Now, Elaine Kelly brings continental theory into the conversation to explore the ethical dilemmas stemming from emerging global political crises of migration, displacement and communal relocation related to climate change. She argues that, in the era of anthropocentric climate change, an 'ethos of dwelling' must underpin adaptation practices. Key FeaturesThe first focused engagement to apply deconstruction and Levinasian ethics to the pressing and complex dilemmas of climate change and human mobilityDetailed case studies of Bangladesh, the Torres Strait Islands and Queensland in Australia and New Orleans in the US bring into sharp focus the ethics and politics of adapting to climate change and how this universal phenomenon is experienced unevenly by the poor and marginalisedInterdisciplinary and multi-methodological approach, relevant to disciplines from cultural studies to philosophy and from ecohumanities to international relations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474422963 20180618
Green Library
Book
xxix, 248 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Foreword Patrick Murphy Introduction Robert Bell and Robert Ficociello Part I: Mediation Chapter 1: "For $19.99, Terror at the Finish Line Can Be Yours!": Creating Individual Identity Through Collective Tragedy in the Boston Marathon Bombings Amy Lantinga Chapter 2: Re-Telling Fukushima, Re-Shaping Citizenship: Women Netizens in Japan Nicole L. Freiner Chapter 3: The Locals do it better? The Strange Victory of Occupy Sandy Peer Illner Chapter 4: "Monsters in Human Form:" Representations of Looting in American Disaster Narratives Charles Byler Chapter 5: The Deepwater Horizon Disaster: Communicating Environmental Disaster in the Age of Technology Kristen Chamberlain and Marceleen Mosher Chapter 6: "The storm of the century": Typhoon Yolanda, the Event, and the Project of U.S. Empire in the Philippines Danielle Crawford Part II: Remediation Chapter 7: "The Missing Element is the Human Element": Ontological Difference and the World-Ecological Crisis of the Capitalocene Kirk Boyle Chapter 8: Challenging Developmentalist Narratives: Helon Habila's Oil on Water as a Representation of the Extractivist Exploitation in the Niger Delta Region Minna Niemi Chapter 9: A Random Harvest: The Leftovers, Debt, and the "strange non-death" of Neoliberalism Liane Tanguay Chapter 10: Appropriating the Zombie Apocalypse: The Politics of Disaster Erik Trump Chapter 11: The Politics of Aesthetics in Beasts of the Southern Wild: Mapping the Ethical Limits of Filmic Narratives in the Wake of Epochal Disaster Cycles Stephanie Hankinson Chapter 12: Neohumanism in the Anthropocene: Jim Jarmusch's Only Lovers Left Alive Hannah Stark.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498534765 20180129
The edited collection, Eco Culture: Disaster, Narrative, Discourse, opens a conversation about the mediated relationship between culture and ecology. The dynamic between these two great forces comes into stark relief when a disaster--in its myriad forms and narratives--reveals the fragility of our ecological and cultural landscapes. Disasters are the clashing of culture and ecology in violent and tragic ways, and the results of each clash create profound effects to both. So much so, in fact, that the terms ecology and culture are past separation. We are far removed from their prior historical binaric connection, and they coincide through a supplementary role to each other. Ecology and culture are unified.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498534765 20180129
Green Library
Book
69 pages ; 18 cm.
Green Library
Book
ix, 139 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
ix, 192 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Introduction - Thinking Through AtmospheresSara Asu Schroer and Susanne B. Schmitt 2. Hauptschule: Atmospheres of boredom and ruinationStefan Wellgraf 3. The making of pub atmospheres and George Orwell's Moon Under Water Robert Shaw 4. Vapours in the sphere: Malaria, atmosphere and landscape in wet lands of Agro Pontino, ItalyPaolo Gruppuso 5. Senses of being: The atmospheres of listening to birds in Britain, Australia and New ZealandAndrew Whitehouse 6. "A feeling for birds": Tuning into more-than-human atmospheresSara Asu Schroer 7. Making charismatic ecologies: Aquarium atmospheresSusanne B. Schmitt 8. Waves of Experience: Atmosphere and LeviathanJulia Bee and Gerko Egert 9. From affective encounters to wearable forms: Fashion design pedagogy and the creation of atmosphereTodd E. Nicewonger 10. Living atmospheres: Air, breath, song and mutual constitution in experimental theatreCaroline Gatt 11. The harsh smell of scentless art: on the synaesthetic gesture of hospital atmosphere Anette Stenslund 12. On the Dynamic and Duration of Atmosphere: Sounding out New Phenomenology through Music at China's marginsFriedlind Riedel.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472468338 20180129
The notion of atmosphere has always been part of academic discourse, but often refers to something vague and diffuse - a phenomenon connected with our affective engagement with the world that is difficult to grasp. This volume develops and refines the concept of atmosphere, seeking to render it productive for anthropological and social scientific research by bringing together a range of original ethnographic studies in combination with investigation of the use of the term in language. The chapters examine dimensions of atmosphere through topics of interdisciplinary concern, such as learning and the acquisition of skills, the experience of place, affect and mood, multi-species relations and the perception of weather and environment - whether in natural landscapes, medical and educational settings, homes or creative contexts - Exploring Atmospheres Ethnographically analyses the relational and transformational processes through which people perceive, experience and live in a moving atmospheric world. As such, it will appeal to scholars of anthropology, sociology, geography and cultural studies with interests in space and place, sensory ethnography and affect.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472468338 20180129
Green Library
Book
x, 253 pages ; 24 cm.
The philanthropist and philosopher Strachan Donnelley (1942-2008) devoted his life to studying the complex relationship between humans and nature. Founder and first president of the Center for Humans and Nature, Donnelley was a pioneer in the exploration and promotion of the idea that human beings individually and collectively have moral and civic responsibilities to natural ecosystems. In this wide-ranging volume, Donnelley traces the connections between influential figures such as Aldo Leopold and Charles Darwin, as well as lesser-known but original thinkers that he met during the course of a full life?ministers at his church, friends with whom he fished, and colleagues who shared his passion for research and writing. He grounds his work in classic philosophers such as Descartes, Spinoza, and Whitehead and reinterprets their writings about the natural world to develop a conservation-centered philosophy, which he dubs ""democratic ecological citizenship."" Edited by his daughter, Ceara Donnelley, and Bruce Jennings, Frog Pond Philosophy illuminates the dominant strands of Donnelley's intellectual identity as a philosopher, naturalist, agitator, and spiritualist. Despite his often grim depiction of the current state of the environment, Donnelly never surrenders his faith in humanity's ability to meet its ethical obligations to conserve, respect, and nurture the complexity and diversity of the natural world. His vivid and personal essays, rooted in everyday experiences, offer a distinctive perspective on questions of urgent contemporary importance.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813167275 20180306
Green Library
Book
xiv, 225 pages, 18 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
  • The Anthropocene: the promise and pitfalls of an epochal idea / Rob Nixon
  • Hubris. Anthropocene in a jar / Tomas Matza, Nicole Heller
  • Concretes speak / Rachel Harkness, Cristian Simonetti, Judith Winter
  • The age of (a) man / Joseph Masco
  • The manual pesticide spray pump / Michelle Mart, Cameron Muir
  • Hubris or humility: genealogies of the Anthropocene / Gregg Mitman
  • Living and dying. Huia echoes / Julianne Lutz Warren
  • Snarge / Gary Kroll
  • Marine animal satellite tags / Nils Hanwahr
  • Artificial coral reef / Josh Wodak
  • Freezing life in the Anthropocene / Elizabeth Hennessy
  • Racism and the Anthropocene / Laura Pulido
  • Sabotaging the Anthropocene; or, in the praise of mutiny / Marco Armiero
  • Laboring. On possibility; or, the monkey wrench / Daegan Miller
  • The German calico quilt / Bethany Wiggin
  • Anthropocene aesthetics / Robert S. Emmett
  • Making. The mirror: testing the counter-Anthropocene / Sverker Sorlin
  • Objects from Anna Schwartz's cabinet of curiosities / Judit Hersko
  • Technofossil / Jared Farmer
  • Davies Creek Road / Anthropocene cabinets of curiosity: objects of strange change / Libby Robin.
What can a pesticide pump, a jar full of sand, or an old calico print tell us about the Anthropocene the age of humans? Just as paleontologists look to fossil remains to infer past conditions of life on earth, so might past and present-day objects offer clues to intertwined human and natural histories that shape our planetary futures. In this era of aggressive hydrocarbon extraction, extreme weather, and severe economic disparity, how might certain objects make visible the uneven interplay of economic, material, and social forces that shape relationships among human and nonhuman beings?Future Remains is a thoughtful and creative meditation on these questions. The fifteen objects gathered in this book resemble more the tarots of a fortuneteller than the archaeological finds of an expedition they speak of planetary futures. Marco Armiero, Robert S. Emmett, and Gregg Mitman have assembled a cabinet of curiosities for the Anthropocene, bringing together a mix of lively essays, creatively chosen objects, and stunning photographs by acclaimed photographer Tim Flach. The result is a book that interrogates the origins, implications, and potential dangers of the Anthropocene and makes us wonder anew about what exactly human history is made of.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226508795 20180618
Green Library
Book
ix, 169 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • 1.Research relationships and responsibilities: `Doing' research with `vulnerable' participants: introduction to the special edition Nadia von Benzon and Lorraine van Blerk 2.Relational vulnerability and the research process with former prisoners in Athens, Georgia (USA) Matthew L. Mitchelson 3. Researching migration and enforcement in obscured places: practical, ethical and methodological challenges to fieldwork Pauline Maillet, Alison Mountz and Keegan Williams 4. Civil society activists and vulnerability in South India: the relational politics of life history methods and development research Matt Baillie Smith and Katy Jenkins 5. Being patient, being vulnerable: exploring experiences of general practice waiting rooms through elicited drawings Kyle Eggleton, Robin Kearns and Pat Neuwelt 6. The ethnographic novel as activist mode of existence: translating the field with homeless people and beyond Michele Lancione 7. Residential ethnography, mixed loyalties, and religious power: ethical dilemmas in faith-based addiction treatment Andrew P. J. W. Williams 8. Confessions of an inadequate researcher: space and supervision in research with learning disabled children Nadia von Benzon.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780815396871 20180604
Drawing on varied expertise from specialisms across the sub-disciplines of social and cultural geography, this book seeks to interrogate what it is to do research with people widely considered to be vulnerable. Written from an emancipatory standpoint, this book addresses the ethical and practical challenges that face researchers working with marginalised people. With chapters exploring the authors' own experiences of working with a wide range of participants including homeless people, indigenous peoples, drug addicts, learning disabled children, and prisoners, the book draws on research undertaken by academics across the globe. Geographical Research with `Vulnerable Groups' unpicks and interrogates each part of the research process, from obtaining ethics permission from review bodies, to recruitment and gatekeepers, through to dissemination of research findings. Throughout the discussion, authors foreground the relational identities of the actors in the research process, highlighting the ways in which institutional attempts to protect marginalised people from risk, perpetuate a perceived, and even material, vulnerability. This honest and empirically driven text will provide an illuminating insight for researchers embarking on research with marginalised people. The chapters in this book were originally published as a special issue of Social & Cultural Geography.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780815396871 20180604
Green Library
Book
xx, 261 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • 1.Self-reliant resiliency and neoliberal mentality: a critical reflection 2.Governing for resilience in vulnerable places: an Introduction 3.Resilient energy landscapes: a spatial quest? 4.Resilience to what and for whom in Landscape Management 5.Resilience thinking - Is vagueness a blessing or a curse in transdisciplinary projects? Experiences from a regional climate change adaptation project 6.Flood resilience and legitimacy - an exploration of Dutch flood risk management 7.Flood Groups in England: Governance arrangements and contribution to flood resilience 8.Meta decision-making and the speed and quality of disaster resilience and recovery 9.The Resiliency Web - A Bottom-Linked Governance Model for Resilience and Environmental Justice in the Context of Disasters 10.Changing Stakes: Resilience, Reconstruction, and Participatory Practices after the 2011 Japan Tsunami 11.The Value of Participatory Community Arts for Community Resilience 12."If we are not united, our lives will be very difficult." Resilience from the perspective of slum dwellers in Pedda Jalaripeta (India) 13.Riding the Tide: Socially-engaged art and resilience in an uncertain future 14.Resilience in practice - a transformative approach? A conversation with Henk Ovink, first Dutch Special Envoy for International Water Affairs.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138216495 20180115
Governing for Resilience in Vulnerable Places provides an overview and a critical analysis of the ways in which the concept `resilience' has been addressed in social sciences research.ã In doing so, this edited book draws together state of the art research from a variety of disciplines (i.e. spatial planning, economic and cultural geography, environmental and political sciences, sociology and architecture) as well as cases and examples across different spatial and geographical contexts (e.g. urban slums in India; flood-prone communities in the UK; coastal Japan). The cases present and explore challenges and potentials of resilience-thinking for practitioners and academics. As such, `Governing for Resilience in Vulnerable Places' aims to provide a scientifically robust overview and to generate some conceptual clarity for researchers, students as well as practitioners interested in the potential of resilience thinking as well as the application of resilience in practice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138216495 20180115
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (pages ; cm.) :.
  • Introduction, Ts'ui-jung Liu, Andrea Janku and David Pietz Part I: Landscape Organization 1. Borders and Mosaics, East and West: Landscape Organization in Environmental History, J. Donald Hughes Part II: Managing the Rivers 2. Writing the Twentieth-Century History of Water on the North China Plain, David Pietz 3. Land Use Change in a Mountainous Area During the Last 300 Years from the Perspective of Spatial Evolution of Settlements: The Case of the Zhangjiu River Basin in Yunnan Province, China, Renlong Huo 4. Taming the Black Snake: Flooding Disasters and River Regulation of the Zengwen River in Colonial Taiwan, Ya-wen Ku Part III: Land Use and Food Production 5. Transformation Through Inundation: Riziculturing Muslim Identity in Qing Dynasty Khotan, David A. Bello 6. The Role of Plant Factory on Food Production and Technology in Japan, Kaihei Koshio Part IV: Development of Eco-cities 7. Eco-city Development in Japan, Kentarou Inoue 8. Ecological Constructions in Coastal Southeast China, Ts'ui-jung Liu 9. Building the Sustainable City of Yilan: The Development of Environmental Governance Learning Capacity, Huang-Jyuhn Wang and He-Liang Huang Part V: Folk Belief and Environment 10. Natural Worship and the Environment in Song China, Jin Liu and Lei Kang 11. The Mountain Spirits and Lake Monsters of Xinjiang Province During the Qing Dynasty, Chuanfei Liu.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351182904 20180618
Covering the ancient period through to the 21st century, this book examines how landscapes have changed across East Asia over time. Featuring examples of a variety of landscapes, from the riverine and agricultural to the urban and aesthetic, this books thus presents a comprehensive review of East Asian environmental history. The eleven chapters, written by an international team of leading scholars, provide analysis of a wide range of spatial, temporal, and thematic considerations. Seeking to use the concept of landscape to evaluate the opportunities and constraints faced by East Asian communities, it also explores the relationship between landscape transformation and human agency. In so doing, it aims to survey the current methodology and scholarship in the field and demonstrate a new approach which encompasses socio-economic and cultural history, as well as GIS-based geographical studies. Providing an in-depth examination of landscape change across the sub-regions of China and Japan, this book will be useful to students and scholars of Asian History and Environmental Studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351182904 20180618
Book
xiii, 224 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction, Ts'ui-jung Liu, Andrea Janku and David Pietz Part I: Landscape Organization 1. Borders and Mosaics, East and West: Landscape Organization in Environmental History, J. Donald Hughes Part II: Managing the Rivers 2. Writing the Twentieth-Century History of Water on the North China Plain, David Pietz 3. Land Use Change in a Mountainous Area During the Last 300 Years from the Perspective of Spatial Evolution of Settlements: The Case of the Zhangjiu River Basin in Yunnan Province, China, Renlong Huo 4. Taming the Black Snake: Flooding Disasters and River Regulation of the Zengwen River in Colonial Taiwan, Ya-wen Ku Part III: Land Use and Food Production 5. Transformation Through Inundation: Riziculturing Muslim Identity in Qing Dynasty Khotan, David A. Bello 6. The Role of Plant Factory on Food Production and Technology in Japan, Kaihei Koshio Part IV: Development of Eco-cities 7. Eco-city Development in Japan, Kentarou Inoue 8. Ecological Constructions in Coastal Southeast China, Ts'ui-jung Liu 9. Building the Sustainable City of Yilan: The Development of Environmental Governance Learning Capacity, Huang-Jyuhn Wang and He-Liang Huang Part V: Folk Belief and Environment 10. Natural Worship and the Environment in Song China, Jin Liu and Lei Kang 11. The Mountain Spirits and Lake Monsters of Xinjiang Province During the Qing Dynasty, Chuanfei Liu.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780815396048 20180618
Covering the ancient period through to the 21st century, this book examines how landscapes have changed across East Asia over time. Featuring examples of a variety of landscapes, from the riverine and agricultural to the urban and aesthetic, this books thus presents a comprehensive review of East Asian environmental history. The eleven chapters, written by an international team of leading scholars, provide analysis of a wide range of spatial, temporal, and thematic considerations. Seeking to use the concept of landscape to evaluate the opportunities and constraints faced by East Asian communities, it also explores the relationship between landscape transformation and human agency. In so doing, it aims to survey the current methodology and scholarship in the field and demonstrate a new approach which encompasses socio-economic and cultural history, as well as GIS-based geographical studies. Providing an in-depth examination of landscape change across the sub-regions of China and Japan, this book will be useful to students and scholars of Asian History and Environmental Studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780815396048 20180618
Green Library