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Book
vii, 403 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
viii, 196 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction. Contexts and Approaches: A plurality of perspectives-- The biospheric perspective-- Human perspectives-- Biospheric dependence-- The paradox of the human position-- "Personal" perspectives. Towards a Synthetic Theory: Map and territory-- Evolutionary-ecological exigencies-- Anthropological contexts-- "Integration". Fundamentals of Integration: Basic needs and ecology-- Conditions and contexts-- Water-- Nutrition-- clothing: (not just) temperature regulation-- Architecture: temperature regulation and safety-- Security and sustainability-- Health. Eco-Cultural Integration: Ecology in culture and "the Good Life"-- Rest and arousal-- Social needs and the company of nature-- Spirituality-- Nature, knowledge, and creativity-- Sustainability and self-efficacy-- Conclusion-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780754646020 20160527
Until recently, there has been a widespread view that we must give up amenities of modern life in order to achieve environmental sustainability. While newspapers and other popular media tend to focus on the negative aspects of environmental change, this volume examines the alternative notion of 'positive ecology'. Initially gleamed from the orientation of 'positive psychology', this argues that environmental science has been all too focused on analysing negative 'pathologies' and forgetting to provide more positive analysis and activism for sustainability. Bringing together a wide range of 'positive ecology' orientated case studies for the first time, the book discusses the wider contexts of how humanity is dependent on a functioning, biodiverse ecosphere of which we are only one part. It provides an original and previously undervalued approach to sustainability, and suggests that work towards sustainability is not only a necessity for our children's future, but necessary, sensible and meaningful in the present.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780754646020 20160527
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
393 p.
  • 1. Introduction Fikret Berkes, Johan Colding and Carl Folke-- Part I. Perspectives on Resilience: 2. Adaptive dancing Lance Gunderson-- 3. Nature and society through the lens of resilience Iain J. Davidson-Hunt and Fikret Berkes-- 4. Redundancy and diversity Bobbi Low, Elinor Ostrom, Carl Simon and James Wilson-- Part II. Building Resilience in Local Management Systems: 5. The strategy of the commons Lars Carlsson-- 6. Management practices for building adaptive capacity Maria Tengo and Monica Hammer-- 7. Living with disturbance Johan Colding, Per Olsson and Thomas Elmqvist-- Part III. Social-ecological Learning and Adaption: 8. Exploring the role of local ecological knowledge in ecosystem management Madhav Gadgil, Per Olsson, Fikret Berkes and Carl Folke-- 9. Facing the adaptive challenge Kristen Blann, Steve Light and Jo Ann Musumeci-- 10. Caribou co-management in northern Canada Anne Kendrick-- Part IV. Cross-scale Institutional Response to Change: 11. Dynamics of social-ecological changes in a lagoon fishery in southern Brazil Cristiana Seixas and Fikret Berkes-- 12. Keeping ecological resilience afloat in cross-scale turbulence Janis Alcorn, John Bamba, Stefanus Masiun, Ita Natalia and Antoinette Royo-- 13. Policy transformations in the US Forest Sector, 1970-2000 Ronald L. Trosper-- 14. Synthesis Carl Folke, Johan Colding and Fikret Berkes.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521815925 20160528
In the effort towards sustainability, it has become increasingly important to develop conceptual frames to understand the dynamics of social and ecological systems. Drawing on complex systems theory, this book investigates how human societies deal with change in linked social-ecological systems, and build capacity to adapt to change. The concept of resilience is central in this context. Resilient social-ecological systems have the potential to sustain development by responding to and shaping change in a manner that does not lead to loss of future options. Resilient systems also provide capacity for renewal and innovation in the face of rapid transformation and crisis. The term navigating in the title is meant to capture this dynamic process. Case studies and examples from several geographic areas, cultures and resource types are included, merging forefront research from natural sciences, social sciences and the humanities into a common framework for new insights on sustainability.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521815925 20160528
Green Library
Book
415 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 210 p. ; 21 cm.
We are living beyond our means, running up debts both economic and ecological, consuming the planet's resources at rates not remotely sustainable. But it's hard to imagine a different way. How can we live without cheap goods and easy credit? How can we consume without consuming the systems that support life? How can we live well and live within our means? In Treading Softly, Thomas Princen helps us imagine an alternative. We need, he says, a new normal, an ecological order that is actually economical with resources, that embraces limits, that sees sustainable living not as a "lifestyle" but as a long-term connection to fresh, free-flowing water, fertile soil, and healthy food. The goal would be to live well by living well within the capacities of our resources. Princen doesn't offer a quick fix -- there's no list of easy ways to save the planet to hang on the refrigerator. He gives us instead a positive, realistic sense of the possible, with an abundance of examples, concepts, and tools for imagining, then realizing, how to live within our biophysical means.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262014175 20160603
Green Library
Journal/Periodical
v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 590 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Foreword Preface Introduction: Capital and Ecology â On the Ecological-Marxian Analysis of the Ecological Crisis Part 1: John Bellamy Foster's Research on the Ecological Crisis 1 The Theoretical Basis of Ecological Civilization â Constructing a Marxist Theory of Ecology â Ecological Theory in Marx's Work â The Essence of Marx's Philosophical Materialism â Insights from Marx's Ecological Theory 2 The Ecological Implications of Marx's Materialist View of Nature â Marx's Materialist Conception of Nature in his Doctoral Thesis â Marx's Materialist Conception of Nature in his Relationship with Feuerbach â Marx's Materialism as a Foundation for his Views on Ecology 3 The Ecological Implications of Marx's Materialist Conception of History â Ecological Theory in Marx's Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts, 1844 â Ecological Theory of the Communist Manifesto 4 The Ecological Implications of Marx's Theory of "Metabolism" â The Theory of "Metabolism" in Capital â The "Metabolic Rift" in Capital â On the Cause of the "Metabolic Rift" 5 The Revelation of Marx's Ecological Theory: Antagonism between Capital and Ecology â Marx's View of the Opposition between Capital and Ecology â The Conflict between Capital and Ecology in Today's World 6 The Bush Administration and the Kyoto Protocol â The Bush Administration's Attitude Towards the Kyoto Protocol â The U.S. Government's Attitude Toward the Other "Earth Summits" â Obliging the Third World to "Swallow Pollution" 7 Giving up Illusions in Order to Overcome the Ecological Crisis â Can Environmental Problems be Solved through the "Dematerialization" of the Capitalist Economy? â Can Environmental Problems be Solved through the Development of Science and Technology? â Can Environmental Problems be Solved through a Capitalistic Market Approach to Nature? â Can Environmental Problems be Solved through Moral Reform and Establishing Ecological Ethics? 8 The Fight against the Ecological Crisis â Beyond the Bottom Line of a Money-Driven Economy â Putting People First â Constructing Humanity's Relationship to Nature Based on "Freedom in General" â Having Enough, not Having More â Putting Land Ethics into Practice â Environmental Revolution Necessitates Social Revolution Part 2: Research from Other Ecological Marxists 9 James O'Connor: The Intrinsic Relationship between Marxism and Ecology â Marx's View on "History and Nature" â Marx's view on "Capital and Nature" â Marx's View on "Socialism and Nature" 10 David Pepper: Why Marx's Ecological Theory Is Needed â Now More Than Ever â Marxism Contains Enough Elements for an Ecological Theory â Solution to Environmental Problems in Marxism â Ecological Contradictions: Inherent Contradictions of Capitalist Societies in Marxism â Capitalism: "Inherently Environmentally Unfriendly" in Marxism â The Cause of Overpopulation, Famine and "Natural Shortages" in Marxism â Overcoming Alienation from Nature and "Asserting its Humanness" in Marxism â Rationally Regulating Humanity's Relationship to Nature in Marxism 11 Paul Burkett: The Inherent Relationship between Natural, Social and Environmental Crises in Marxism â The Four Necessary Conditions of Social Ecology â Nature and Historical Materialism â The Analysis of Ecological Value and the Theory of Capitalism â Perspectives on the Ecological Implications of Communism 12 Andre Gorz: Surpassing Economic Logic as the Key to Constructing an Ecological Civilization â The Capitalistic Division of Labor as the Root of all Alienation â Capitalism's Profit Motive as the Cause of Ecological Destruction â Beyond Economic Logic, the Implementation of Ecological Logic â Advanced Socialism as the Key to Protecting the Environment 13 Ben Agger: The Ecological Dilemma has Shattered People's Faith in Capitalism â Re-examining the Theory of the Crisis of Capitalism â Toward an Ecological Marxism â Transforming Capitalism through Decentralization and Debureaucratization â Combining American Populism with Ecological Marxism 14 William Leiss: A Marxist Approach to Green Theory â The Logical Connection between Controlling Nature and Controlling People â Human Satisfaction Ultimately Lies in Production, Not in Consumption 15 Herbert Marcuse: The Marxist Path to Ecological Revolution â Marx's Theory of the Liberation of Nature in the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts, 1844 â An Analysis of Ecology in Today's World â Marcuse's Theory of the Liberation of Nature and the "Club of Rome" Part 3: The Implications of Ecological Marxism 16 Marxism and the Construction of an Ecological Civilization â The Ecological Vision in Marx's Works â The Practical Significance of Marx's Ecological Worldview 17 The Inspiration of Ecological Marxism for Constructing an Ecologically Friendly Civilization â From Humanity's Conflict with Nature to Conflicts between Human Beings â The Advantages of Constructing an Ecological Civilization in a Socialist Society â Constructing Ecological Civilization and Creating Humanity's New Way of Being â Making the Construction of Ecological Civilization into a Great Revolution of Thought 18 Ecological Marxism's Opposition to Postmodernism â "Green Politics" as a Form of Post-modern Politics â Should Modernization be Abandoned or Reformed? â Eco-centrism or Anthropocentrism? â Can Rationality Correct the Biases of Rationalism? â The Proper Way to Regard the Functions of Science and Technology â Humankind's Search for Meaning â The Theoretical and Practical Relevance of Ecological Marxism Compared to Postmodernism 19 Western Marxism's Rejection of Postmodernism â The Confrontation between Ecological Marxism and Postmodernism â The Inheritance of Habermas' Reflections on Modernity â The Inheritance of the Frankfurt School's Critique of Society â The Inheritance of the Pioneers of Western Marxism â A Reflection on the Positive Significance of Marxism Itself 20 Personal Fulfillment through Production Rather than Consumption â An Essential Thesis of Ecological Marxism â Focusing on Production Rather than Consumption â New Concepts for an Overhaul of Current Consumption Patterns â Seeking Satisfaction in Productive Activity â The Implications of the Thesis of Fulfillment through Productive Activity 21 Ecological Marxism's New Reflection on Contemporary Capitalism â The Cause of the Ecological Crisis-the Capitalist Mode of Production â From the Critique of the Profit Motive to the Critique of the Economic Reason of Capitalism â The Relationship between Environmental Protection and the Existing Capitalist Modes of Production â Capitalist Countries are Largely Ecologically Imperialist Countries â "Sustainable Development" is Impossible under Capitalism 22 An Ecologically Friendly Civilization is an Essential Goal of Chinese Socialism â Creating Environmental Standards for Chinese Socialism â Scientific Development Means "Green" Development â A Harmonious Society Founded on Harmony between Humanity and Nature â Promoting Human Fulfillment through the Unity of Humanity and Nature 23 The Strategic Choice for the Construction of Ecological Civilization under Chinese Socialism â The Three Strategies That we Can Not and Should Not Choose â The Viable Strategy of Ecologically Oriented Modernization 24 Challenges for the Construction of an Ecologically Friendly Civilization â Capital: Utilizing and Restricting â Technology: Development and Control â Production: Expansion and Reform â Consumption: Stimulus and Guidance.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004355965 20171211
The worsening environmental crisis has become a serious threat to mankind. The search for a solution to this crisis must begin by understanding its causes. Taking an eco-socialist perspective, The Ecological Crisis and the Logic of Capital explores the logic of capitalism as a fundamental cause of today's environmental crisis, in particular the thirst for profit and the capitalist mode of production. By demonstrating the inherent antagonism between capital and ecology, this book argues that proposals to resolve the crisis within the capitalist system are utopian, that proposed remedies relying on scientific progress, alternative energies, low-carbon technologies or the introduction of ecological ethics and new attitudes toward Nature into market mechanisms are doomed to failure without a radical overhaul of the principles that govern capitalism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004355965 20171211
Green Library
Book
xiv, 337 p. ; 23 cm.
This work presents case studies of programmes that recognize indigenous rights, and brings direct experience to bear on the international debate over intellectual property, conservation and indigenous rights.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781559633796 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 337 p. ; 23 cm.
This work presents case studies of programmes that recognize indigenous rights, and brings direct experience to bear on the international debate over intellectual property, conservation and indigenous rights.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781559633796 20160528
Green Library
Book
xvi, 200 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Preface * Introduction * Urban Affluence and Shifting Environmental Burdens * Urban Water: From Health to Sustainability * Shifting Environmental Challenges in Accra, Jakarta and Sao Paulo * Organizing Environmental Improvements in Deprived Neighbourhoods: Plans, Markets, Local Collective Action and Beyond * Techniques for Assessing Local Environmental Problems in Deprived Neighbourhoods * Gender and Local Environmental Management in Accra * Urban Environmental Justice in a Changing World * References * Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781853835612 20160528
Local environments such as cities and neighbourhoods are becoming a focal point for those concerned with environmental justice and sustainability. "The Citizens at Risk" takes up this emerging agenda and analyses the key issues in a refreshingly simple yet sophisticated style. Taking a comparative look at cities in Africa, Asia and Latin America, the book examines: the changing nature of urban environmental risks, the rules governing the distribution of such risks and their differential impact, how the risks arise and who is responsible. The authors clearly describe the most pressing urban environmental challenges, such as improving health conditions in deprived urban settlements, ensuring sustainable urban development in a globalizing world, and achieving environmental justice along with the greening of development. They argue that current debates on sustainable development fail to come to terms with these challenges, and call for a more politically and ethically explicit approach. For policy makers, students, academics, activists or concerned general readers, this book applies a wealth of empirical analysis and theoretical insight to the interaction of citizens, their cities and their environment.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781853835612 20160528
Green Library
Book
xviii, 269 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • Introduction : juxtaposing urban forestry and agriculture in the PlaNYC era
  • Greening New York City : political economic context and environmental stewardship from 1970-present
  • Creating PlaNYC : the politics of urban sustainability planning
  • City of forests : planting one million trees
  • Beyond planting : creating an urban forestry movement
  • Growing in the city : from community gardening to urban agriculture
  • City of farms : cultivating urban agriculture through food policy visions and plans
  • Constructing the "greener, greater" city : politics, discourses, and material practices
  • City as ecosystem : changing form, function, and governance of urban socio-nature
  • Epilogue : from Bloomberg to de Blasio and beyond.
City of Forests, City of Farms is a history of recent urban forestry and agriculture policy and programs in New York City. Centered on the 2007 initiative PlaNYC, this account tracks the development of policies that increased sustainability efforts in the city and dedicated more than $400 million dollars to trees via the MillionTreesNYC campaign. Lindsay K. Campbell uses PlaNYC to consider how and why nature is constructed in New York City. Campbell regards sustainability planning as a process that unfolds through the strategic interplay of actors, the deployment of different narrative frames, and the mobilizing and manipulation of the physical environment, which affects nonhuman animals and plants as well as the city's residents. Campbell zeroes in on a core omission in PlaNYC?s original conception and funding: Despite NYC having a long tradition of community gardening, particularly since the fiscal crisis of the 1970s, the plan contained no mention of community gardens or urban farms. Campbell charts the change of course that resulted from burgeoning public interest in urban agriculture and local food systems. She shows how civic groups and elected officials crafted a series of visions and plans for local food systems that informed the 2011 update to PlaNYC. City of Forests, City of Farms is a valuable tool that allows us to understand and disentangle the political decisions, popular narratives, and physical practices that shape city greening in New York City and elsewhere.0.
Green Library

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