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Book
xx, [676] pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 28 cm
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
xxvii, 530, 4, 24, 17 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), color maps ; 28 cm
What is the "big picture" in environmental science? Our authors know and effectively communicate it in Environmental Science: Systems and Solutions, Sixth Edition. Whether you view the subject through a scientific, social, political, or historical lens, you'll find the concrete foundations here that work for courses in both environmental science and environmental studies. A systems approach is the connective fabric that makes sense of the wealth of topics and data, which demonstrates how aspects of the natural environment interconnect with each other and with human society. A section on Resource Use and Management introduces the concept of sustainability, and another on Dealing with Environmental Degradation discusses threats to the environment and mitigation strategies. A bonus section available online on Social Solutions to Environmental Concerns, discusses the complex issues impacting the environment and the scientific, technologic, and human behavioral ways to address them. Throughout the text you will find the hard data necessary for a scientific study of the environment and the measured analysis ideal for our time. Combining evidence-based, contemporary information and data with relevant case studies, practical applications, numerous calculations, and modern references, Environmental Science: Systems and Solutions teaches and engages.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781284091700 20180326
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Journal/Periodical
v. : ill. ; 28-30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiii, 177 pages : illustrations (some color), maps ; 22 cm.
  • 1. Introduction: The Evolution of Environmental EnforcementMark Ungar2. Amazonia, Organized Crime and Illegal Deforestation: Best Practices for the Protection of the Brazilian Amazon RainforestFranco Perazzoni 3. Deforestation in the Bolivian Amazon: The Case of the El Chore Forest Reserve in Santa Cruz DepartmentManlio Alberto Roca Zamora 4. Peru: A Legal Enforcement Model for the AmazonHugo R. Gomez Apac, Maria Antonieta Merino de Taboada, and Milagros Granados Mandujano 5. Ecuador: Rainforest under SiegeVictor Lopez Acevedo6. Colombia: Bridging the Gaps between What Is Needed and What Actually Exists Regarding the Protection of Its AmazonAna Maria Hernandez Salgar and Luz Marina Mantilla Cardenas7. Environmental Penal Control in Venezuela: Amazonia and the Orinoco Mining ArcManuel Joel Diaz Capdevilla8. Suriname: An Exposed InteriorKatia Delvoye, Minu Parahoe, and Hermes Libretto.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319565514 20171121
This book is the most updated and comprehensive look at efforts to protect the Amazon, home to half of the world's remaining tropical forests. In the past five years, the Basin's countries have become the cutting edge of environmental enforcement through formation of constitutional protections, military operations, stringent laws, police forces, judicial procedures and societal efforts that together break through barriers that have long restrained decisive action. Even such advances, though, struggle to curb devastation by oil extraction, mining, logging, dams, pollution, and other forms of ecocide. In every country, environmental protection is crippled by politics, bureaucracy, unclear laws, untrained officials, small budgets, regional rivalries, inter-ministerial competition, collusion with criminals, and the global demand for oils and minerals. Countries are better at creating environmental agencies, that is, than making sure that they work. This book explains why, with country studies written by those on the front lines-from national enforcement directors to biologists and activists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319565514 20171121
Green Library
Book
94 pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm
For curious young minds who ask why? how? what? when? and then why? again and again, the bestselling team behind Ada Twist, Scientist has developed a STEM project book based on the beloved character. Ada herself will take readers through the scientific method and show them how to build experiments to find the answers to all kinds of burning questions. Budding scientists will solve everyday mysteries and come to think more critically about the world around them. Like Rosie's and Iggy's project books, Ada's will be empowering and kid-friendly, with tons of classroom and parent appeal. No kid's lab would be complete without it!.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781419730245 20180521
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
xx, 234 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction Prof. Bruce B. Janz (University of Central Florida, USA), "Peripherality and Non-Philosophy in African Philosophy: Womanist Philosophy, Environmental Philosophy and Other Provocations." Prof. Alexander Animalu & Mr. Jeff Unegbu (University of Nigeria Nsukka, Nigeria), "Gaia Hypothesis from an African Perspective." Prof. Thaddeus Metz (University of Johannesburg, South Africa), "How to Ground Animal Rights on African Values: A Constructive Approach." Dr. Kevin Behrens (University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa), "An African Account of the Moral Obligation to Preserve Biodiversity." Prof. Olatunji Oyeshile (University of Ibadan, Nigeria), "Transformation of Urban Space in South-West of Nigeria, 2011 to Present: Ethical Issues in Development and Aesthetics" Prof. Ebunoluwa Oduwole & Dr. Fayemi Kazeem (Olabisi Onabanjo University & University of Lagos, Nigeria), "Animal Rights vs. Animal Care Ethics: Interrogating the Relationship to Non-Human Animals in Yoruba Culture." Prof. Workineh Kelbassa (Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia), "Women and the Environment in Africa." Prof. Oladele Balogun & Dr. Fayemi Kazeem (Olabisi Onabanjo University & University of Lagos, Nigeria), "Women Identities in African Environmental Ethics: A Conversational Engagement." Dr. Jonathan Chimakonam (University of Calabar, Nigeria), "Ohanife: An Account of the Ecosystem based on the African notion of Relationship." Dr. Angela Roothaan (Free University Amsterdam, Netherlands), "Hermeneutics of Trees in an African Context: Enriching the Understanding of the Environment `for the Common Heritage of Mankind.'" Victor Nweke (University of Calabar, Nigeria), Global Warming as an Ontological Boomerang Effect: Towards a Philosophical Rescue from the African Place." Dr. Ralph Madu (Catholic Secretariat of Nigeria), "Laudato Si and the Ecological Crisis." Dr. Ada Agada (University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria) "Catalyzing Climate Change Action in Nigeria: Moderate Anthropocentrism and the African Perspective of the Cosmos". Prof. Fainos Mangena (University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe) "Zimbabwe's Environmental Crisis: Questioning Ubuntu?" Francis Diawuo and Abdul Karim Issifu (University for Development Studies, Ghana and University of Cape Coast, Ghana) "Exploring the African Traditional Belief Systems (Totems and Taboos) in Natural Resources Conservation and Management in Ghana".
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138297135 20180205
African Philosophy and Environmental Conservation is about the unconcern for, and marginalisation of, the environment in African philosophy. The issue of the environment is still very much neglected by governments, corporate bodies, academics and specifically, philosophers in the sub-Saharan Africa. The entrenched traditional world-views which give a place of privilege toã one thing over the other, as for example men over women, is the same attitude that privileges humans over the environment. This culturally embedded orientation makes it difficult for stake holders in Africa to identify and confront the modern day challenges posed by the neglect of the environment. In a continent where deep-rooted cultural and religious practices, as well as widespread ignorance, determine human conduct towards the environment, it becomes difficult to curtail much less overcome the threats to our environment. It shows that to a large extent, the African cultural privileging of men over women and of humans over the environment somewhat exacerbates and makes the environmental crisis on the continent intractable. For example, it raises the challenging puzzle as to why women in Africa are the ones to plant the trees and men are the ones to fell them. Contributors address these salient issues from both theoretical and practical perspectives, demonstrating what African philosophy could do to ameliorate the marginalisation which the theme of environment suffers on the continent. Philosophy is supposed to teach us how to lead the good life in all its forms; why is it failing in this duty in Africa specifically where the issue of environment is concerned? This book which trail-blazes the field of African Philosophy and Environmental Ethics will be of great interest to students and scholars of Philosophy, African philosophy, Environmental Ethics and Gender Studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138297135 20180205
Green Library
Book
xxiv, 358 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • Preface Craig E. Colten and Lary M. Dilsaver Introduction Geoffrey L. Buckley and Yolonda Youngs Part I: Nature Gone Wild Chapter 1: Toward a Historical Geography of Human-Invasive Species Relations: How Kudzu Came to Belong in the American South Derek H. Alderman Chapter 2: Unruly Domestic Environments: Do-It-Yourself Pesticides, Gender, and Regulation in Post-World War II Homes Dawn Biehler Chapter 3: From Noble Stag to Suburban Vermin: The Return of Deer to the Northeast United States Bob Wilson Part II: Parks and Recreation Chapter 4: Wild, Unpredictable, and Dangerous: A Historical Geography of Hazards and Risks in U.S. National Parks Yolonda Youngs Chapter 5: Migration and Social Justice in Wilderness Creation Katie Algeo and Collins Eke Chapter 6: Racialized Assemblages and State Park Design in the Jim Crow South William E. O'Brien Chapter 7: Shredding Mountain Lines: GoPro, Mobility, and the Spatial Politics of Outdoor Sports Annie Gilbert Coleman Part III: Living in the City Chapter 8: Frederick Law Olmsted's Abandoned San Francisco Park Plan Terence Young Chapter 9: Inventing Phoenix: Land Use, Politics, and Environmental Justice Abigail M. York and Christopher G. Boone Chapter 10: Fresh Kills Landfill: Landscape to Wastescape to Ecoscape Martin V. Melosi Part IV: Transforming the Environment Chapter 11: Progressive Legacy: Fred Besley and the Rise of Professional Forestry in Maryland Geoffrey L. Buckley Chapter 12: Gold vs. Grain: Oblique Ecologies of Hydraulic Mining in California Gareth Hoskins Chapter 13: Bridging the Florida Keys: Engineering an Environmental Transformation, 1904-1912 K. Maria D. Lane Chapter 14: Florida's Springs: Growth, Tourism, and Politics Christopher F. Meindl Part V: Eye on Nature Chapter 15: Reconsidering the Sublime: Images and Imaginative Geographies in American Environmental History Finis Dunaway Chapter 16: American Environmental Photography Steven Hoelscher Chapter 17: Environments of the Imagination Dydia DeLyser Afterword William Wyckoff.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442269965 20180416
This innovative book provides a dynamic--and often surprising--view of the range of environmental issues facing the United States today. A distinguished group of scholars examines the growing temporal, spatial, and thematic breadth of topics historical geographers are now exploring. Seventeen original chapters examine topics such as forest conservation, mining landscapes, urban environment justice, solid waste, exotic species, environmental photography, national and state park management, recreation and tourism, and pest control. Commemorating the twenty-fifth anniversary of the publication of the seminal work The American Environment: Interpretations of Past Geographies, the book clearly shows much has changed since 1992. Indeed, not only has the range of issues expanded, but an increasing number of geographers are forging links with environmental historians, promoting a level of intellectual cross-fertilization that benefits both disciplines. As a result, environmental historical geographies today are richer and more diverse than ever. The American Environment Revisited offers a comprehensive overview that gives both specialist and general readers a fascinating look at our changing relationships with nature over time.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442269965 20180416
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (236 pages)
  • 1. Introduction: Examining the terrain Eric Freedman & Mark Neuzil Part I: Habitat, conservation, and restoration 2. The dam dilemma for fisheries management in the Great Lakes Daniel B. Hayes, Robert McLaughlin, Brian Roth & Lisa Peterson 3. Irrigation in the Great Lakes Basin: prospects and conflicts B. Timothy Heinmiller 4. Artificial reefs and reef restoration in the Laurentian Great Lakes Edward F. Roseman, Jeremy Pritt & Matthew McLean Part II: Extinction & survival 5. Georgian Bay, Lake Huron: turtles and their wetland habitat in a changing landscape Chantel Markle & Patricia Chow-Fraser 6. Framing extinction: Societal attitudes toward the passenger pigeon in editorials and opinion pieces Bruno Takahashi, Ran Duan, Apoorva Joshi, Anthony Van Witsen & Eric Freedman 7. Recovering the ecology of fear: Cascading effects of gray wolf predation and competition in a Great Lakes Basin forest David G. Flagel 8. Linear corridors and predator movement dynamics in the Great Lakes Basin Victoria M. Donovan & Jesse N. Popp Part III: Pollution, climate change, and invasive species 9. Toxicants in the Great Lakes: living with a toxic legacy while managing for chemicals of emerging concern Dalma Martinovic-Weigelt, Heiko L. Schoenfuss & Jane R. Feely 10. Water quality in the Great Lakes: Interactions between nutrient pollution, invasive species, and climate change Gaston E. Small 11. Emerald ash borer, black ash, and Native American basketmaking: Invasive insects, forest ecosystems and cultural practices Therese M. Poland, Maria R. Emery, Tina Ciaramitaro, Ed Pigeon & Angie Pigeon Part IV: Public Policy 12. Legislating the Great Lakes: socially constructing water through congressional discourse Theresa R. Castor 13. Conservation authorities in Ontario: key players in the governance of invasive and endangered species Andrea Olive 14. Citizen engagement, interpretation, and resource management in the Great Lakes Basin Gail Vander Stoep 15. 7 Indigenous principles for successful cooperation in Great Lakes conservation initiatives Kyle P. Whyte, Nicholas J. Reo, Deborah McGregor, M.A. (Peggy) Smith, James F. Jenkins & Kathleen A. Rubio Part V: Conclusions 16. Through the crystal ball Mark Neuzil & Eric Freedman.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351977050 20180521
The Great Lakes Basin in North America holds more than 20 percent of the world's fresh water. Threats to habitats and biodiversity have economic, political, national security, and cultural implications and ramifications that cross the US-Canadian border. This multidisciplinary book presents the latest research to demonstrate the interconnected nature of the challenges facing the Basin. Chapters by U.S. and Canadian scholars and practitioners represent a wide range of natural science and social science fields, including environmental sciences, geography, political science, natural resources, mass communications, environmental history and communication, public health, and economics. The book covers threats from invasive species, industrial development, climate change, agricultural and chemical runoff, species extinction, habitat restoration, environmental disease, indigenous conservation efforts, citizen engagement, environmental regulation, and pollution.Overall the book provides political, cultural, economic, scientific, and social contexts for recognizing and addressing the environmental challenges faced by the Great Lakes Basin.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351977050 20180521
Book
1 online resource.
  • 1. Introduction: Examining the terrain Eric Freedman & Mark Neuzil Part I: Habitat, conservation, and restoration 2. The dam dilemma for fisheries management in the Great Lakes Daniel B. Hayes, Robert McLaughlin, Brian Roth & Lisa Peterson 3. Irrigation in the Great Lakes Basin: prospects and conflicts B. Timothy Heinmiller 4. Artificial reefs and reef restoration in the Laurentian Great Lakes Edward F. Roseman, Jeremy Pritt & Matthew McLean Part II: Extinction & survival 5. Georgian Bay, Lake Huron: turtles and their wetland habitat in a changing landscape Chantel Markle & Patricia Chow-Fraser 6. Framing extinction: Societal attitudes toward the passenger pigeon in editorials and opinion pieces Bruno Takahashi, Ran Duan, Apoorva Joshi, Anthony Van Witsen & Eric Freedman 7. Recovering the ecology of fear: Cascading effects of gray wolf predation and competition in a Great Lakes Basin forest David G. Flagel 8. Linear corridors and predator movement dynamics in the Great Lakes Basin Victoria M. Donovan & Jesse N. Popp Part III: Pollution, climate change, and invasive species 9. Toxicants in the Great Lakes: living with a toxic legacy while managing for chemicals of emerging concern Dalma Martinovic-Weigelt, Heiko L. Schoenfuss & Jane R. Feely 10. Water quality in the Great Lakes: Interactions between nutrient pollution, invasive species, and climate change Gaston E. Small 11. Emerald ash borer, black ash, and Native American basketmaking: Invasive insects, forest ecosystems and cultural practices Therese M. Poland, Maria R. Emery, Tina Ciaramitaro, Ed Pigeon & Angie Pigeon Part IV: Public Policy 12. Legislating the Great Lakes: socially constructing water through congressional discourse Theresa R. Castor 13. Conservation authorities in Ontario: key players in the governance of invasive and endangered species Andrea Olive 14. Citizen engagement, interpretation, and resource management in the Great Lakes Basin Gail Vander Stoep 15. 7 Indigenous principles for successful cooperation in Great Lakes conservation initiatives Kyle P. Whyte, Nicholas J. Reo, Deborah McGregor, M.A. (Peggy) Smith, James F. Jenkins & Kathleen A. Rubio Part V: Conclusions 16. Through the crystal ball Mark Neuzil & Eric Freedman.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351977050 20180521
The Great Lakes Basin in North America holds more than 20 percent of the world's fresh water. Threats to habitats and biodiversity have economic, political, national security, and cultural implications and ramifications that cross the US-Canadian border. This multidisciplinary book presents the latest research to demonstrate the interconnected nature of the challenges facing the Basin. Chapters by U.S. and Canadian scholars and practitioners represent a wide range of natural science and social science fields, including environmental sciences, geography, political science, natural resources, mass communications, environmental history and communication, public health, and economics. The book covers threats from invasive species, industrial development, climate change, agricultural and chemical runoff, species extinction, habitat restoration, environmental disease, indigenous conservation efforts, citizen engagement, environmental regulation, and pollution.Overall the book provides political, cultural, economic, scientific, and social contexts for recognizing and addressing the environmental challenges faced by the Great Lakes Basin.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351977050 20180521
ProQuest Ebook Central Access limited to 3 simultaneous users
Book
xvi, 296 pages : maps ; 22 cm
An insightful look at the American environmental crisis and emerging solutions from the heartland to the coasts in the era of global climate change Eminent ecologist Jeremy B. C. Jackson and award-winning journalist Steve Chapple traveled the length of the Mississippi River interviewing farmers, fishermen, scientists, and policymakers to better understand the mounting environmental problems ravaging the United States. Along their journey, which quickly expands to California, Florida, and New York, the pair uncovered surprising and profound connections between ecological systems and environmental crises across the country. Artfully weaving together independent research and engaging storytelling, Jackson and Chapple examine the looming threats from recent hurricanes and fires, industrial agriculture, river mismanagement, extreme weather events, drought, and rising sea levels that are pushing the country toward the breaking point of ecological and economic collapse. Yet, despite these challenges, the authors provide optimistic and practical solutions for addressing these multidimensional issues to achieve greater environmental stability, human well-being, and future economic prosperity. With a passionate call to action, they look hopefully toward emerging and achievable solutions to preserve the country's future.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300179392 20180530
Green Library
Book
xi, 280 pages ; cm.
A political history of environmental policy and regulation in California, from the Gold Rush to the present Over the course of its 150-year history, California has successfully protected its scenic wilderness areas, restricted coastal oil drilling, regulated automobile emissions, preserved coastal access, improved energy efficiency, and, most recently, addressed global climate change. How has this state, more than any other, enacted so many innovative and stringent environmental regulations over such a long period of time? The first comprehensive look at California's history of environmental leadership, California Greenin' shows why the Golden State has been at the forefront in setting new environmental standards, often leading the rest of the nation. From the establishment of Yosemite, America's first protected wilderness, and the prohibition of dumping gold-mining debris in the nineteenth century to sweeping climate- change legislation in the twenty-first, David Vogel traces California's remarkable environmental policy trajectory. He explains that this pathbreaking role developed because California had more to lose from environmental deterioration and more to gain from preserving its stunning natural geography. As a result, citizens and civic groups effectively mobilized to protect and restore their state's natural beauty and, importantly, were often backed both by business interests and bystrong regulatory authorities. Business support for environmental regulation in California reveals that strict standards are not only compatible with economic growth but can also contribute to it. Vogel also examines areas where California has fallen short, particularly in water management and the state's dependence on automobile transportation. As environmental policy debates continue to grow more heated, California Greenin' demonstrates that the Golden State's impressive record of environmental accomplishments holds lessons not just for the country but for the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691179551 20180530
Green Library
Book
xi, 280 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Gold mining : wealth creation and environmental devastation
  • Protecting the land
  • Protecting California's coast
  • Managing water resources
  • Protecting air quality
  • Energy efficiency and climate change
  • California's regulatory leadership : broader implications.
A political history of environmental policy and regulation in California, from the Gold Rush to the present Over the course of its 150-year history, California has successfully protected its scenic wilderness areas, restricted coastal oil drilling, regulated automobile emissions, preserved coastal access, improved energy efficiency, and, most recently, addressed global climate change. How has this state, more than any other, enacted so many innovative and stringent environmental regulations over such a long period of time? The first comprehensive look at California's history of environmental leadership, California Greenin' shows why the Golden State has been at the forefront in setting new environmental standards, often leading the rest of the nation. From the establishment of Yosemite, America's first protected wilderness, and the prohibition of dumping gold-mining debris in the nineteenth century to sweeping climate- change legislation in the twenty-first, David Vogel traces California's remarkable environmental policy trajectory. He explains that this pathbreaking role developed because California had more to lose from environmental deterioration and more to gain from preserving its stunning natural geography. As a result, citizens and civic groups effectively mobilized to protect and restore their state's natural beauty and, importantly, were often backed both by business interests and bystrong regulatory authorities. Business support for environmental regulation in California reveals that strict standards are not only compatible with economic growth but can also contribute to it. Vogel also examines areas where California has fallen short, particularly in water management and the state's dependence on automobile transportation. As environmental policy debates continue to grow more heated, California Greenin' demonstrates that the Golden State's impressive record of environmental accomplishments holds lessons not just for the country but for the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691179551 20180530
Law Library (Crown)
Book
viii, 252 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : color illustrations, map ; 23 cm
  • AcknowledgmentsIntroduction1. The WatersSusquehanna RiverGunpowder RiverCorsica RiverPatuxent RiverPotomac RiverJames RiverSouthern Bay2. The PeopleHarry HughesParris GlendeningJohn GriffinBonnie BickMichael BeerCarole MorisonOoker Eskridge3. The WildlifeOystersDermo and MSXBlue CrabsStriped BassAmerican EelsSturgeon4. The PoliciesEnforcementPennsylvaniaAir Pollution versus Water PollutionAgricultureClimate ChangeAdvocacy and Pollution TradingAccountabilityConclusionNotesIndex.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781421424750 20180508
When Captain John Smith arrived in Virginia in 1607, he discovered a paradise in the Chesapeake Bay. In the centuries that followed, the Bay changed vastly-and not for the better. European landowners and enslaved Africans slashed, burned, and cleared the surrounding forests to grow tobacco. Watermen overfished oysters, shad, and sturgeon, decimating these crucial species. Baltimore, Washington, and Richmond used its rivers as urban sewers. By the 1960s, the Chesapeake was dying. A crossroads of life and culture, the Chesapeake straddles the North and the South, mixes salt water with fresh, and is home to about 18 million people and 3,600 species of animals and plants. Although recent cleanup efforts have improved its overall health, they have not been enough to save this national treasure. In The Chesapeake in Focus, award-winning writer Tom Pelton examines which environmental policies have worked and which have failed. Based on Pelton's extensive experience as a journalist and as the host of the public radio program The Environment in Focus, this sweeping book takes readers on a tour of the histories of the Chesapeake, as well as the ecological challenges faced by its major tributaries. It details the management of blue crabs, striped bass, and other delicious wildlife, profiles leaders and little-known characters involved in the restoration campaign, and warns of the dangers of anti-regulatory politics that threaten to reverse what has been accomplished. Looking to the future, Pelton offers a provocative vision of the hard steps that must be taken if we truly want to save the Bay.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781421424750 20180508
Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Book
1 online resource.
  • List of Abbreviations vii Acknowledgments ix Introduction 1 I. The Making of a Metropolitan Environment 1. The Porfirian Metropolitan Environment 19 2. Revolution and the Metropolitan Environment 51 II. Spaces of a Metropolitan Environment 3. Water and Hygiene in the City 81 4. The City and Its Forests 109 5. Desiccation, Dust, and Engineered Waterscapes 136 6. The Political Ecology of Working-Class Settlements 164 7. Industrialization and Environmental Technocracy 193 Conclusion 218 Notes 235 Bibliography 291 Index 321.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822370406 20180521
In A City on a Lake Matthew Vitz tracks the environmental and political history of Mexico City and explains its transformation from a forested, water-rich environment into a smog-infested megacity plagued by environmental problems and social inequality. Vitz shows how Mexico City's unequal urbanization and environmental decline stemmed from numerous scientific and social disputes over water policy, housing, forestry, and sanitary engineering. From the prerevolutionary efforts to create a hygienic city supportive of capitalist growth, through revolutionary demands for a more democratic distribution of resources, to the mid-twentieth-century emergence of a technocratic bureaucracy that served the interests of urban elites, Mexico City's environmental history helps us better understand how urban power has been exercised, reproduced, and challenged throughout Latin America.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822370406 20180521
Book
xxi, 103 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Section I: Locating Environmental Justice in Rural Places Introduction Section II: Theorizing the "Justice" in Environmental Justice 1. An Integrative Framework for Environmental Justice Section III: Researcher Statement 2. The Narrative Moment: Informing Environmental Claims through Ethnographic Analysis Section IV: Just Places: A Story of Cultural and Environmental Injustice in Land Between the Rivers 3. Cultural and Environmental History of Settlement: 1779 - 1945 4. Development Projects and Displacement Narratives: 1945-present Section V: Contextualizing the Environmental Justice Movement in Land Between the Rivers 5. Exploring Strategies of Justice in Community Mobilization: The Case of Land Between the Rivers Section VI: Towards an Integrative Framework for Environmental Justice Concluding Remarks.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498507844 20180416
Conceptualizing Environmental Justice evolved from an ethnographic study of an environmental justice movement in a rural community called Land Between the Rivers in Kentucky. The environmental movement emerged as a result of collective displacement for the construction of two dams and an environmental refuge over a period of sixty years. This book explores the historical and contemporary efforts to mobilize the community and asks what specific strategies and tools were adopted and how these tools coalesced into four justice themes: cultural injustices, economic deprivation, institutional fairness, and political agency. It explores how each theme shaped and informed the displaced residents' efforts to protect their rights and seek justice. This book argues that expanding the conceptual foci of environmental justice theory and identifying both distributive and non-distributive themes of justice allows us to understand the complexities of environmental movement narratives and examine what shape environmental justice movements will take in the future.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498507844 20180416
Green Library
Book
vii, 227 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Chapter 1. Introduction Chapter 2. Critique and Climate Change in Sloterdijk Chapter 3. Critique and Climate Change in Zizek Chapter 4. Critique and Climate Change in Morton Chapter 5. Critique and Climate Change in Latour References Index About the Author.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498570879 20180618
How do contemporary critical thinkers find a way to work between the doubt that grounds their thinking and the knowing needed to ground emancipatory political struggles? In this overview of four contemporary thinkers'-Timothy Morton, Peter Sloterdijk, Slavoj Zizek, and Bruno Latour-approaches to critique and climate change, communication scholar Murdoch Stephens discusses and analyses the fissures, elisions, and paradoxes that inform critical theory. This book delves into how critical theory offers important insights for those interested in climate change, but also how critical theory faces challenges to its constitution when faced with issues that are both urgent and yet require a scientific rigour that is not the specialty of critique. Written from the perspective of the interdisciplinary field of environmental communication, Critical Environmental Communication: How Does Critique Respond to the Urgency of Climate Change? argues for re-orienting the field towards the tensions and possibilities drawn from these four authors.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498570879 20180618
Green Library
Book
viii, 207 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 23 cm.
George T. Malvaney's life epitomizes the old maxim that ""You cannot make this stuff up."" Combine a young Klansman from Mississippi, an armed coup attempt in the Caribbean, a stay in prison, and a life-changing epiphany, and you have but half of this swashbuckling tale. Throw in the worst man-made ecological disaster in the history of the United States, and you have unleashed Malvaney's full life story. The Klansman, the soldier of fortune, the wild-eyed prisoner transforms into a renowned leader of the Mississippi Gulf Coast cleanup effort in the wake of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. In his too-crazy-not-to-be-true memoir, Malvaney chronicles what easily should be several lifetimes of adventure--and misadventure. Growing up in a close-knit family in Jackson, Mississippi, the young Malvaney preferred woods and swamps to the drudgery of high school. He dropped out, enlisted in the Navy, and shortly afterwards joined the Ku Klux Klan. While onboard, he organized a branch of the Klan, corrupting and endangering his crewmen. After his discharge, he answered a mercenary call to take part in an invasion of Dominica, a Caribbean fiasco known as the ""Bayou of Pigs."" That madness landed him in a federal penitentiary. And there, somehow, he vowed to turn his life around. Cups Up, a title drawn from the wake-up call shouted at prisoners, is a story of perseverance, cleansing, and redemption. It chronicles the roller coaster life of a high school dropout, ex-Klansman, ex-mercenary, ex-felon, and ex-con, who went on to become a college graduate, a hardnosed environmental regulator, and a widely respected top executive in a company with more than a thousand employees.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781496816795 20180618
Green Library
Book
xii, 201 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Lists of figures List of Contributors Acknowledgments Introduction Part 1: `Doc' Collapse Chapter 1: Culture and collapse: Theses on catastrophic history for the 21st century Michael Egan Chapter 2: Are dead zones dead? Environmental collapse in popular media about eutrophication in sea-based systems. Jesse Peterson Chapter 3: Can photojournalism steer clear of the siren song of collapse? Joanna Nurmis Chapter 4: Environmental collapse in comics: Reflections on Philippe Squarzoni's Saison brune Ann Gardiner Part II: `Pop' Collapse Chapter 5: This is the end of the world as we know it: Narratives of collapse and transformation in archaeology and popular culture Guy D. Middleton Chapter 6: Survive, thrive, or perish: Environmental collapse in post-apocalyptic digital games Jennifer England Chapter 7: Zooming out, closing in: Ecology at the end of the frontier Alison E. Vogelaar and Brack Hale Part III: `Craft' Collapse Chapter 8: Imagining the apocalypse: Valences of collapse in McCarthy, Burtynsky and Goldsworthy I. J. MacRae Chapter 9: `Something akin to what's killing bees': The poetry of colony collapse disorder Matthew Griffiths Chapter 10: Salvaging the fragments: Metaphors for collapse in Virginia Woolf and Station Eleven Alexandra Peat.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138217140 20180618
In recent years, `environmental collapse' has become an important way of framing and imagining environmental change and destruction, referencing issues such as climate change, species extinction and deteriorating ecosystems. Given its pervasiveness across disciplines and spheres, this edited volume articulates environmental collapse as a discursive phenomenon worthy of sustained critical attention. Building upon contemporary conversations in the fields of archaeology and the natural sciences, this volume coalesces, explores and critically evaluates the diverse array of literatures and imaginaries that constitute environmental collapse. The volume is divided into three sections- Doc- Collapse, Pop Collapse and Craft Collapse -that independently explore distinct modes of representing, and implicit attitudes toward, environmental collapse from the lenses of diverse fields of study including climate science and policy, cinema and photo journalism. Bringing together a broad range of topics and authors, this volume will be of great interest to scholars of environmental communication and environmental humanities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138217140 20180618
Green Library
Video
1 streaming video file (75 min.) : digital, sound, color
Diagnosed with learning difficulties, Tori finds her greatest teacher in nature, spending a 'gap year' living semi-primitively with four other young women in Oregon's Cascades.