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Book
xxvi, 354 pages : illustrations, maps / ; 28 cm
A variety of exercises provide flexibility in lab assignments. Each exercise includes key terms and learning concepts linked to Geosystems. The 10th Edition includes more integrated media, including Quick Response (QR) codes linking to Pre-Lab videos. Supported media resources needed for exercises including KMZ files for all of the Google Earth (TM) exercises found in the lab manual.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780134686363 20180213
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
1 online resource (950 p.) : ill. (chiefly col.), maps (chiefly col.).
"This is the proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Asian and Pacific Coasts. The conference focuses on coastal engineering and related fields among Asian and Pacific countries/regions. It includes the classical topics of the coastal engineering as well as topics on coastal environment, marine ecology, coastal oceanography, and fishery science and engineering. The book will be valuable to professionals and graduate students in this field."--Publisher's website.
Book
242 pages : illustrations, maps ; 22 cm
  • Brimstone and fire from out of Heaven : Pompeii, Roman Empire, AD 79
  • Bury the dead and feed the living : Lisbon, Portugal, 1755
  • The greatest catastrophe : Iceland, 1783
  • What we forget : California, United States, 1861-1862
  • Finding faults : Tokyo-Yokohama, Japan, 1923
  • When the levee breaks : Mississippi, United States, 1927
  • Celestial disharmony : Tangshan, China, 1976
  • Disasters without borders : the Indian Ocean, 2004
  • A study in failure : New Orleans, Louisiana, United States, 2005
  • To court disaster: L'Aquila, Italy, 2009
  • The Island of Ill Fortune : Tohoku, Japan, 2011
  • Resilience by design : Los Angeles, California, sometime in the future.
"By the world-renowned seismologist, a surprising history of natural disasters, their impact on our culture, and new ways of thinking about the ones to come Earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, volcanoes--these all stem from the same forces that give our planet life. It is only when they exceed our ability to withstand them that they become disasters. Viewed together, these events have shaped our cities and their architecture; elevated leaders and toppled governments; influenced the way we think, feel, fight, unite, and pray. The history of natural disasters is a history of ourselves. In The Big Ones, renowned seismologist Dr. Lucy Jones offers a bracing look at some of our most devastating natural events, whose reverberations we continue to feel today. Spanning from the destruction of Pompeii in AD 79 to the hurricanes of 2017, it considers disaster's role in the formation of our religions; exposes the limits of human memory; and demonstrates the potential of globalization to humanize and heal. With temperatures rising around the world, natural disasters are striking with greater frequency than ever before. More than just history or science, The Big Ones presents a call to action. Natural hazards are inevitable; human catastrophes are not. With this energizing and exhaustively researched book, Dr. Jones offers a look at our past, readying us to face down the Big Ones in our future"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (x, 411 pages) : illustrations (chiefly color), maps (chiefly color).
  • â The Greenbrier Karst.- Geology of the Greenbrier Valley.- Hydrology of the Greenbrier Karst.- Karst Geomorphology.- The Exploration History of the Greenbrier Valley Caves.- The Swago Creek Basin.- The Little Levels and the Hills Creek Basin.- The Friars Hole System.- Caves, Karst, and Science in the Buckeye Creek Cave Watershed.- The Culverson Creek Cave System.- The Contact Caves of Central Greenbrier County.- The Hydrology of the Sinking Creek/Muddy Creek Karst Basin.- Organ Cave.- Caves of the Dickson Spring Basin, Monroe County.- Windy Mouth Cave.- Scott Hollow Cave.- The Laurel Creek Basin and Greenville Saltpeter Cave.- Terrestrial Fauna in the Greenbrier Karst.- The Subterranean Aquatic Fauna of the Greenbrier Karst.- PleistoceneVertebrates from Greenbrier Valley Caves.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319658001 20180514
The focus of this book is on the more than 2000 caves of the Greenbrier Valley of West Virginia of which the 14 with lengths greater than 10 km have an aggregate length of 639 km. The major caves form the core part of sub-basins which drain to big springs and ultimately to the Greenbrier River. Individual chapters of this book describe each of the major caves and its associated drainage basin. The caves are formed in the Mississippian Greenbrier Limestone in a setting of undulating gentle folds. Fractures, lineaments and confining layers within the limestone are the main controlling factors. The caves underlie an extensive sinkhole plain which may relate to a major erosion surface. The caves are habitat for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms which are cataloged and described as are the paleontological remains found in some of the caves. The sinkhole plain of the Greenbrier karst and the underlying complex of cave systems are the end result of at least a ten million year history of landscape evolution which can be traced through the evolving sequence of cave passages and which is described in this book.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319658001 20180514
EBSCOhost Access limited to 1 user
Book
1 online resource.
  • Part 1. Background and Setting.- Chapter 1. Geographic Extent and Characteristics of the World's Drylands and Their Peoples.- Chapter 2. Recent Trends in Drylands and Future Scope for Advancement.- Chapter 3. Global Change and its Consequences for the World's Arid Lands.- Part 2. Arid lands under a global change regime.- Chapter 4. Humans as Change Agents in Drylands (With Special Reference to Qinghai- Tibet Plateau).- Chapter 5. Climate Variability and Impact on Livelihoods in the Cold Arid Tibet Plateau.- Chapter 6. Iran's Arid Zone Watershed Protection Initiative.- Chapter 7. Thar Desert -- Its Land Management, Livelihoods and Prospects in a Global Warming Scenario.- Part 3. Northern Hemisphere Aridlands: Selected Examples.- Chapter 8. Dry Lands of North America - Current Status and Future Prospects.- Chapter 9. Desertification and Land Degradation in Indian Sub Continent: Issues, Present Status and Future Challenges. Chapter 10. China's Drylands -Problems Prospects.- Chapter 11. Aridlands of North Africa and the Mediterranean Basin - Current Status and Future Prospects.- Part 4. Southern Hemisphere Aridlands: Selected Examples.- Chapter 12. Southern African Drylands -- Current Status and Future Prospects.- Chapter 13. Arid and Semiarid Rangelands of Argentina.- Chapter 14. The Impact of Climate Variability on Land use and Livelihoods in Australia's Rangelands.- Part 5. Summary, Synthesis and Concluding Remarks.- Chapter 15. Drylands Under a Climate Change Regime: Implications for the Land and the Pastoral People they Support.- Chapter 16. Unifying concepts, synthesis and conclusions.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319566801 20180521
This edited volume is devoted to the examination of the implications of the inevitable changes wrought by global change on the welfare and livelihoods of tens of millions of people who live in dryland regions. Global change is more than just climate change and the ramifications of changing trade patterns (geopolitical and economic aspects), the shift to the market economy, demographic factors (population growth, urbanization and re-settlement), receive attention here. Land use change specialists, policy makers and natural resource management agencies will find the book very useful. Chapters focus on examples that are drawn from a number of sources including previously unpublished studies on the impact of climate change, markets and economics on pastoralist and dryland farming households. The key focus is to provide readers with insights into the real world implications of change (including an analysis of the drivers of change) on these vulnerable groups within dryland societies. The role of humans as agents of these changes is canvassed. A regional analysis of the world's drylands is also performed including those in Australia, Argentina, India, North America, China, North Africa, Central Asia and Southern Africa.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319566801 20180521
ProQuest Ebook Central Access limited to 1 user
Book
1 online resource : illustrations, maps.
Book
1 online resource : illustrations, map.
Book
1 online resource ( xi, 305 pages) : illustrations (some color). Digital: text file; PDF.
  • Part I. EDML Facts and Physics
  • 1 Getting Started
  • 2 Antarctica and EPICA
  • 3 The EDML Drilling Site
  • 4 Multiscale Structure of the EDML Core
  • 5 EDML Line-Scan Images. Part II. EDML Visual Stratigraphy Record.
The line-scan images collected in this book represent the most accurate optical record of Antarctic ice cores ever presented, providing an invaluable resource for glaciologists and climate modellers, as well as a fascinating compilation of ice core images for Antarctica enthusiasts. Global warming and the Earth's past climate are the two main reasons for extracting deep ice cores from Antarctica. Indeed, dust particles, aerosols and other climatic traces deposited on the snow surface, as well as the air trapped in bubbles by compacted snow, produce chronologically ordered strata, making the ice from Antarctica the most accurate and valuable archive of the Earth's climate over the last million years. In addition, the layered structure produced by these strata, when revealed by appropriate methods, provides indispensable information concerning the flow and mechanical stability of the Antarctic ice sheet, allowing us to assess the current and future impact of global warming on the melting of polar ice caps with much greater precision.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783662553060 20180521
ProQuest Ebook Central Access limited to 1 user
Book
1 online resource (431 pages) : illustrations, tables
  • Introduction.- Rainfall and floods.- Floods and drainage basin features.- Hydrograph and unit hydrograph analysis.- Rational flood methodologies.- Probability and statistical methods.- Flood design discharge and its significance.- Climate change impact on floods.- Flood safety and hazard.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319523552 20180521
This book draws on the author's professional experience and expertise in humid and arid regions to familiarize readers with the basic scientific philosophy and methods regarding floods and their impacts on human life and property. The basis of each model, algorithm and calculation methodology is presented, together with logical and analytical strategies. Global warming and climate change trends are addressed, while flood risk assessments, vulnerability, preventive and mitigation procedures are explained systematically, helping readers apply them in a rational and effective manner. Lastly, real-world project applications are highlighted in each section, ensuring readers grasp not only the theoretical aspects but also their concrete implementation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319523552 20180521
Book
1 online resource ( xiv, 422 pages) : illustrations (some color).
  • Introduction.- Rainfall and floods.- Floods and drainage basin features.- Hydrograph and unit hydrograph analysis.- Rational flood methodologies.- Probability and statistical methods.- Flood design discharge and its significance.- Climate change impact on floods.- Flood safety and hazard.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319523552 20180521
This book draws on the author's professional experience and expertise in humid and arid regions to familiarize readers with the basic scientific philosophy and methods regarding floods and their impacts on human life and property. The basis of each model, algorithm and calculation methodology is presented, together with logical and analytical strategies. Global warming and climate change trends are addressed, while flood risk assessments, vulnerability, preventive and mitigation procedures are explained systematically, helping readers apply them in a rational and effective manner. Lastly, real-world project applications are highlighted in each section, ensuring readers grasp not only the theoretical aspects but also their concrete implementation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319523552 20180521
ProQuest Ebook Central Access limited to 1 user
Book
1 online resource.
  • Part I Introduction and characteristics of permafrost 1 Definition and description 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Additional terms originating in Russia 1.3 History of permafrost research 1.4 Measurement of ground temperature 1.5 Conduction, convection and advection 1.6 Thermal regimes in regions based on heat conduction 1.7 Continentality index 1.8 Moisture movement in the active layer during freezing and thawing 1.9 Moisture conditions in permafrost grond 1.10 Results of freezing moisture 1.11 Strength of ice 1.12 Cryosols, gelisols, and leptosols 1.13 Fragipans 1.14 Salinity in permafrost regions 1.15 Organic matter 1.16 Micro-organisms in permafrost 1.17 Gas and gas hydrates 1.18 Thermokarst areas 1.19 Offshore permafrost 2 Cryogenic processes where temperatures dip below 0â ¦C 2.1 Introduction 2.2 The nature of ice and water 2.3 Effects of oil pollution on freezing 2.4 Freezing and thawing of the active layer in permafrost in equilibrium with a stable climate 2.5 Relation of clay mineralogy to the average position of the permafrost table 2.6 Ground temperature envelopes in profiles affected by changes in mean annual ground surface temperature (MASGT) 2.7 Needle ice 2.8 Frost heaving 2.9 Densification and thaw settlement 2.10 Cryostratigraphy, cryostructures, cryotextures and cryofacies 2.11 Ground cracking 2.12 Dilation cracking 2.13 Frost susceptibility 2.14 Cryoturbation, gravity processes and injection structures 2.15 Upheaving of objects 2.16 Upturning of objects 2.17 Sorting 2.18 Weathering and frost comminution 2.19 Karst in areas with permafrost 2.20 Seawater density and salinity 3 Factors affecting permafrost distribution 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Climatic factors 3.3 Terrain factors 4 Permafrost distribution 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Zonation of permafrost 4.3 Permafrost mapping 4.4 Examples of mapping units used 4.5 Modeling permafrost distribution 4.6 Advances in geophysical methods 4.7 Causes of variability reducing the reliability of small-scale maps 4.8 Maps of permafrost-related properties based on field observations 4.9 Use of remote sensing and aiborne platforms in monitoring environmental conditions and distubances 4.10 Sensitivity to climate change: Hazard zonation 4.11 Classification of permafrost stability based on mean annual ground temperature Part II Permafrost landforms II.1 Introduction 5 Frost cracking, ice-wedges, sand, loess and rock tessellons 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Primary and secondary wedges 6 Massive ground ice in lowlands 6.1 Introduction 6.2 Distribution of massive icy beds in surface sediments 6.3 Sources of the sediments 6.4 Deglaciation of the Laurentide ice sheet 6.5 Methods used to determine the origin of the massive icy beds 6.6 Massive icy beds interpreted as being formed by cryosuction 6.7 Massive icy beds that may represent stgnant glacial ice 6.8 Other origins of massive icy beds 6.9 Ice complexes including Yedoma deposits 6.10 Conditions for growth of thick ice-wedges 6.11 The mechanical condition of the growth of ice-wedges and its connection to the properties of the surrounding sediments 6.12 Buoyancy of ice-wedges 6.13 Summary of the ideas explaining yedoma evolution 6.14 Aufeis 6.15 Perennial ice caves 6.16 Types of ice found in perennial ice caves 6.17 Processes involved in the formation of perennial ice caves 6.18 Cycles of perennial cave evolution 6.19 Ice caves in subtropical climates 6.20 Massive blocks of ice in bedrock or soil 7 Permafrost mounds 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Mounds over 2.5m diameter 7.3 Cryogenic mounds less than 2.5m in diameter 8 Mass wasting of fine-grained materials in cold climates 8.1 Introduction 8.2 Classification of mass wasting 8.3 Slow flows 8.4 Cryogenic fast flows 8.5 Relative effect in moving debris downslope in the mountains 9 Landforms consisting of blocky materials in cold climates 9.1 Introduction 9.2 Source of the blocks 9.3 Influence of rock type 9.4 Weathering products 9.5 Biogenic weathering 9.6 Fate of the sloluble salts produced by chemical and biogenic weathering 9.7 Rate of cliff retreat 9.8 Landforms resulting from the accumulation of predominantly blocky materials in cryogenic climates 9.9 Talus containing significant amounts of finer material 9.10 Cryogenic block streams 9.11 Surface appearance of blocky landforms 10 Cryogenic patterned ground 10.1 Introduction 10.2 Forms of cryogenic patterned ground 10.3 Factors affecting the development of cryogenic patterned ground 10.4 Macroforms of cryogenic patterned ground 10.5 Cryogenic sorted patterned ground 10.6 Identification of active versus inactive forms of macro-sorted patterns 10.7 Microforms of cryogenic patterned ground 11 Thermokarst and thermal erosion 11.1 Introduction 11.2 Causes of thermokarst 11.3 Cavity development in permafrost 11.4 Effect of thermokarst on soil 11.5 Thermokarst landforms 11.6 Thermokarst and thermal erosion along river banks 11.7 Thermal erosion and thermokarst processes along sea coasts 11.8 Processes involved in the erosion of ice-rich arctic coastal sediments 11.9 Importance of coastal erosion of sediments containing permafrost Part III Use of permafrost areas III.1 Introduction 12 The mechanics of frozen soils 12.1 Introduction 12.2 Strains and stresses in the freezing and thawing of soils resulting in frost heaving 12.3 Rheological processes 12.4 Frost susceptibility 13 Foundations in permafrost regions: building stability 13.1 Introduction 13.2 The effect of construction on permafrost stability 13.3 Choice of method of construction 13.4 Building materials 13.5 Timing of construction 13.6 Types of foundations 14 Roads, railways and airfields 14.1 Introduction 14.2 The problems 14.3 Types of roads 14.4 Experimental embankments 14.5 Winter roads 14.6 Environmental effects of winter roads 14.7 Embankment heights 14.8 Unpaved embankments 14.9 Main problems with embankment stability 14.10 Concrete versus ballast railway tracks 14.11 Paving of road and airfield runways 14.12 Use of white paint 14.13 Bridges 14.14 Icings 14.15 Cut slopes 14.16 Airfield construction 15 Oil and gas industry 15.1 Introduction 15.2 Oil and gas exploration 15.3 Drilling rigs 15.4 Production and keeper wells 15.5 Sump problems 15.6 Pipelines 15.7 Monitoring 15.8 Compressor stations 15.9 Pipeline crossings 15.10 Effects of heat advection from producing wells 15.11 Gas hydrates in permafrost ice 16 Mining in permafrost areas 16.1 Introduction 16.2 Placer mining 16.3 Open cast/pit mining 16.4 Underground mining 16.5 Waste materials and tailings ponds 16.5.1 Toxic wastes 17 Provision of utilities 17.1 Introduction 17.2 Water supply 17.3 Waste disposal 17.4 Electric transmission lines 18 Agriculture and forestry 18.1 Introduction 18.2 Zonation of natural vegetation across Siberia 18.3 Zonation of natural vegetation in North America 18.4 Southern and Eastern Kazakhstan, Mongolia and the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau 18.5 The Eichfeld zones 18.6 Asian steppe grasslands and deserts 18.7 The development of modern agriculture in permafrost areas 18.8 Forestry 18.9 Potential effects of climate changes.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351681612 20180521
This book provides a general survey of Geocryology, which is the study of frozen ground called permafrost. Frozen ground is the product of cold climates as well as a variety of environmental factors. Its major characteristic is the accumulation of large quantities of ice which may exceed 90% by volume. Soil water changing to ice results in ground heaving, while thawing of this ice produces ground subsidence often accompanied by soil flowage. Permafrost is very susceptible to changes in weather and climate as well as to changes in the microenvironment. Cold weather produces contraction of the ground, resulting in cracking of the soil as well as breakup of concrete, rock, etc. Thus permafrost regions have unique landforms and processes not found in warmer lands. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 provides an introduction to the characteristics of permafrost. Four chapters deal with its definition and characteristics, the unique processes operating there, the factors affecting it, and its general distribution. Part 2 consists of seven chapters describing the characteristic landforms unique to these areas and the processes involved in their formation. Part 3 discusses the special problems encountered by engineers in construction projects including settlements, roads and railways, the oil and gas industry, mining, and the agricultural and forest industries. The three authors represent three countries and three language groups, and together have over 120 years of experience of working in permafrost areas throughout the world. The book contains over 300 illustrations and photographs, and includes an extensive bibliography in order to introduce the interested reader to the large current literature.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351681612 20180521
ProQuest Ebook Central Access limited to 1 user
Book
1 online resource (810 pages) : illustrations (some color), maps
  • Part I Introduction and characteristics of permafrost 1 Definition and description 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Additional terms originating in Russia 1.3 History of permafrost research 1.4 Measurement of ground temperature 1.5 Conduction, convection and advection 1.6 Thermal regimes in regions based on heat conduction 1.7 Continentality index 1.8 Moisture movement in the active layer during freezing and thawing 1.9 Moisture conditions in permafrost grond 1.10 Results of freezing moisture 1.11 Strength of ice 1.12 Cryosols, gelisols, and leptosols 1.13 Fragipans 1.14 Salinity in permafrost regions 1.15 Organic matter 1.16 Micro-organisms in permafrost 1.17 Gas and gas hydrates 1.18 Thermokarst areas 1.19 Offshore permafrost 2 Cryogenic processes where temperatures dip below 0â ¦C 2.1 Introduction 2.2 The nature of ice and water 2.3 Effects of oil pollution on freezing 2.4 Freezing and thawing of the active layer in permafrost in equilibrium with a stable climate 2.5 Relation of clay mineralogy to the average position of the permafrost table 2.6 Ground temperature envelopes in profiles affected by changes in mean annual ground surface temperature (MASGT) 2.7 Needle ice 2.8 Frost heaving 2.9 Densification and thaw settlement 2.10 Cryostratigraphy, cryostructures, cryotextures and cryofacies 2.11 Ground cracking 2.12 Dilation cracking 2.13 Frost susceptibility 2.14 Cryoturbation, gravity processes and injection structures 2.15 Upheaving of objects 2.16 Upturning of objects 2.17 Sorting 2.18 Weathering and frost comminution 2.19 Karst in areas with permafrost 2.20 Seawater density and salinity 3 Factors affecting permafrost distribution 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Climatic factors 3.3 Terrain factors 4 Permafrost distribution 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Zonation of permafrost 4.3 Permafrost mapping 4.4 Examples of mapping units used 4.5 Modeling permafrost distribution 4.6 Advances in geophysical methods 4.7 Causes of variability reducing the reliability of small-scale maps 4.8 Maps of permafrost-related properties based on field observations 4.9 Use of remote sensing and aiborne platforms in monitoring environmental conditions and distubances 4.10 Sensitivity to climate change: Hazard zonation 4.11 Classification of permafrost stability based on mean annual ground temperature Part II Permafrost landforms II.1 Introduction 5 Frost cracking, ice-wedges, sand, loess and rock tessellons 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Primary and secondary wedges 6 Massive ground ice in lowlands 6.1 Introduction 6.2 Distribution of massive icy beds in surface sediments 6.3 Sources of the sediments 6.4 Deglaciation of the Laurentide ice sheet 6.5 Methods used to determine the origin of the massive icy beds 6.6 Massive icy beds interpreted as being formed by cryosuction 6.7 Massive icy beds that may represent stgnant glacial ice 6.8 Other origins of massive icy beds 6.9 Ice complexes including Yedoma deposits 6.10 Conditions for growth of thick ice-wedges 6.11 The mechanical condition of the growth of ice-wedges and its connection to the properties of the surrounding sediments 6.12 Buoyancy of ice-wedges 6.13 Summary of the ideas explaining yedoma evolution 6.14 Aufeis 6.15 Perennial ice caves 6.16 Types of ice found in perennial ice caves 6.17 Processes involved in the formation of perennial ice caves 6.18 Cycles of perennial cave evolution 6.19 Ice caves in subtropical climates 6.20 Massive blocks of ice in bedrock or soil 7 Permafrost mounds 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Mounds over 2.5m diameter 7.3 Cryogenic mounds less than 2.5m in diameter 8 Mass wasting of fine-grained materials in cold climates 8.1 Introduction 8.2 Classification of mass wasting 8.3 Slow flows 8.4 Cryogenic fast flows 8.5 Relative effect in moving debris downslope in the mountains 9 Landforms consisting of blocky materials in cold climates 9.1 Introduction 9.2 Source of the blocks 9.3 Influence of rock type 9.4 Weathering products 9.5 Biogenic weathering 9.6 Fate of the sloluble salts produced by chemical and biogenic weathering 9.7 Rate of cliff retreat 9.8 Landforms resulting from the accumulation of predominantly blocky materials in cryogenic climates 9.9 Talus containing significant amounts of finer material 9.10 Cryogenic block streams 9.11 Surface appearance of blocky landforms 10 Cryogenic patterned ground 10.1 Introduction 10.2 Forms of cryogenic patterned ground 10.3 Factors affecting the development of cryogenic patterned ground 10.4 Macroforms of cryogenic patterned ground 10.5 Cryogenic sorted patterned ground 10.6 Identification of active versus inactive forms of macro-sorted patterns 10.7 Microforms of cryogenic patterned ground 11 Thermokarst and thermal erosion 11.1 Introduction 11.2 Causes of thermokarst 11.3 Cavity development in permafrost 11.4 Effect of thermokarst on soil 11.5 Thermokarst landforms 11.6 Thermokarst and thermal erosion along river banks 11.7 Thermal erosion and thermokarst processes along sea coasts 11.8 Processes involved in the erosion of ice-rich arctic coastal sediments 11.9 Importance of coastal erosion of sediments containing permafrost Part III Use of permafrost areas III.1 Introduction 12 The mechanics of frozen soils 12.1 Introduction 12.2 Strains and stresses in the freezing and thawing of soils resulting in frost heaving 12.3 Rheological processes 12.4 Frost susceptibility 13 Foundations in permafrost regions: building stability 13.1 Introduction 13.2 The effect of construction on permafrost stability 13.3 Choice of method of construction 13.4 Building materials 13.5 Timing of construction 13.6 Types of foundations 14 Roads, railways and airfields 14.1 Introduction 14.2 The problems 14.3 Types of roads 14.4 Experimental embankments 14.5 Winter roads 14.6 Environmental effects of winter roads 14.7 Embankment heights 14.8 Unpaved embankments 14.9 Main problems with embankment stability 14.10 Concrete versus ballast railway tracks 14.11 Paving of road and airfield runways 14.12 Use of white paint 14.13 Bridges 14.14 Icings 14.15 Cut slopes 14.16 Airfield construction 15 Oil and gas industry 15.1 Introduction 15.2 Oil and gas exploration 15.3 Drilling rigs 15.4 Production and keeper wells 15.5 Sump problems 15.6 Pipelines 15.7 Monitoring 15.8 Compressor stations 15.9 Pipeline crossings 15.10 Effects of heat advection from producing wells 15.11 Gas hydrates in permafrost ice 16 Mining in permafrost areas 16.1 Introduction 16.2 Placer mining 16.3 Open cast/pit mining 16.4 Underground mining 16.5 Waste materials and tailings ponds 16.5.1 Toxic wastes 17 Provision of utilities 17.1 Introduction 17.2 Water supply 17.3 Waste disposal 17.4 Electric transmission lines 18 Agriculture and forestry 18.1 Introduction 18.2 Zonation of natural vegetation across Siberia 18.3 Zonation of natural vegetation in North America 18.4 Southern and Eastern Kazakhstan, Mongolia and the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau 18.5 The Eichfeld zones 18.6 Asian steppe grasslands and deserts 18.7 The development of modern agriculture in permafrost areas 18.8 Forestry 18.9 Potential effects of climate changes.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351681612 20180521
This book provides a general survey of Geocryology, which is the study of frozen ground called permafrost. Frozen ground is the product of cold climates as well as a variety of environmental factors. Its major characteristic is the accumulation of large quantities of ice which may exceed 90% by volume. Soil water changing to ice results in ground heaving, while thawing of this ice produces ground subsidence often accompanied by soil flowage. Permafrost is very susceptible to changes in weather and climate as well as to changes in the microenvironment. Cold weather produces contraction of the ground, resulting in cracking of the soil as well as breakup of concrete, rock, etc. Thus permafrost regions have unique landforms and processes not found in warmer lands. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 provides an introduction to the characteristics of permafrost. Four chapters deal with its definition and characteristics, the unique processes operating there, the factors affecting it, and its general distribution. Part 2 consists of seven chapters describing the characteristic landforms unique to these areas and the processes involved in their formation. Part 3 discusses the special problems encountered by engineers in construction projects including settlements, roads and railways, the oil and gas industry, mining, and the agricultural and forest industries. The three authors represent three countries and three language groups, and together have over 120 years of experience of working in permafrost areas throughout the world. The book contains over 300 illustrations and photographs, and includes an extensive bibliography in order to introduce the interested reader to the large current literature.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351681612 20180521
Book
xvii, 247 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), color maps ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Delineation of Groundwater Potential Zones in Jaisamand Basin of Udaipur District, by P.K Singh.- 2. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Groundwater Level: A Case Study of Wainganga Sub-basin Nagpur, India, by Chandan Kumar Singh.- 3. Spatio-temporal Variation and Trend Analysis of Groundwater Level in Raipur City, Chhattisgarh, by Sumant Kumar.- 4. Spatio-Temporal Relationship Linking Land Use/Land Cover with Groundwater Level, by Vishwanatha Bhat and Prajwal M.- 5. Groundwater System Modelling and Sensitivity of Groundwater Level Prediction in Indo-Gangatic Alluvia Plains, by Raj Mohan Singh.- 6. Assessing Groundwater Aquifer Vulnerability Using GIS-Based DRASTIC Model Coupling with Hydrochemical Parameters in Granitic Terrain From Southern India by N C Mondal.- 7. An Innovative Technology for Recharging Alluvial Aquifers, by Sujata Ray.- 8. Development of Groundwater Recharge Plan for Bemetara District of Chhattisgarh Using GIS, by M K Tripathi.- 9. Paleochannel Recharge Sources in the Central Godavari Delta, A.P., India By R. Satyaji Rao Yellamelli.- 10. Change of Land Use/Land Cover on Groundwater Recharge in Malaprabha Catchment, Belagavi, Karnataka, India, by Purandara B. K.- 11. Causes and Sources of Groundwater Pollution: A Case Study of Nagpur City, India, by Sahajpreet Kaur Garewal.- 12. Modeling Leachate Migration- Pramada S K.- 13. Assessment of Groundwater Quality and Identification of Hydrogeochemical Process in Hard Rock Terrain by K. Rama Mohan.- 14. Spatial and Temporal Nitrate Transport in Deep Heterogeneous Vadose Zone of India's Alluvial Plain, by Jahageer Tomar.- 15. Riverbank Filtration as a Sustainable Solution for Drinking Water Quality and Quantity Problems in Haridwar, Uttarakhand, by Shashi Poonam Indwar.- 16. A Study of the Characteristics of Groundwater Solute Transport Parameters, by Biswajit Chakravorty.- 17. Prioritization for Management of Groundwater Quality Related Problems of Rajsamand District of Rajasthan, by K K Yadav.- 18. Effect of Biochar Amendment on Nitrate Leaching in Two Soil Types of India, by Anil K. Kanthle.- 19. Seasonal Variation of Groundwater Quality in and Around Laharpur Reservoir Bhopal by Neha Nigam.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811057885 20180226
This book comprises the select proceedings of the International Conference on Water, Environment, Energy and Society. The book is divided into three parts. The first part deals with some aspects of groundwater focusing on delineation of groundwater zones, spatio-temporal variability of groundwater, and aquifer vulnerability. The second part is on some aspects of groundwater recharge, dealing with recharge sources, management of recharge and recharge technology, change of land use / land cover on groundwater recharge. The concluding part covers groundwater quality, encompassing causes and sources of pollution, leachate migration, river bank filtration, variability of quality, assessment and management of quality. The book will be of interest to researchers and practitioners in the field of water resources, hydrology, environmental resources, agricultural engineering, watershed management, earth sciences, as well as those engaged in natural resources planning and management. Graduate students and those wishing to conduct further research in water and environment and their development and management will also find the book to be of value.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811057885 20180226
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
446 pages, 8 page of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.
  • Vivre et regarder : l'enjeu de la perception -- Un paysage à la verticale -- Invisibles verticalités -- Un autre regard : la montagne avec soi -- Élever son regard ou l'enjeu de la contemplation -- La mort venue d'en-haut -- La montagne démoniaque -- Les montagnards entre ours et crétins -- Ethnotypes et régimes politiques -- Déchéance montagnarde et "intramontanité" assumée -- Croire et faire croire : les nouvelles idéologies de la montagne -- Une première "défense" de la montagne -- Un dialogue entre deux identités -- Gouverner en chasseur de chamois : Maximilien de Habsbourg et la montagne -- L'insolence de la montagne : les contre-verticalités suisses -- Des rois de la montagne et par la montagne : la majesté alpine des Savoie -- Montagne confessionnalisée ? -- L'ascension comme édification -- La montagne, espace de conversion -- La montagne terre de mission -- Monter et descendre : les dynamiques de la verticalité -- Vaincre la pente -- Conquête verticale et ambition politique -- Vide -- Humilité -- Vitesse -- L'hiver de la vie : sagesse ou illusion ? -- Double versant et politique de la double vue -- La notion politique des "précipices" -- Circuler : les enjeux du déplacement et du dépassement de soi -- La liminalité du passage "delà les monts" -- Un défi logistique -- Une dynamique de victoire -- Un rite initiatique et politique -- De mauvais chemins pour un mauvais pays -- Un chemin tracé pour la conquête -- Corriger et percer -- La montagne : une frontière impossible ? -- Combattre : les enjeux stratégiques de la montagne -- Des principes acte -- Une première adaptation au milieu naturel ? -- Une prise en compte tactique de la montagne -- Grands principes et guerres minuscules -- La montagne augmentée : réalité et fantasme -- La Barricade : un usage militaire et politique de la montagne -- Du refuge à la petite guerre -- Rêver : les enjeux de l'imaginaire, entre identité et valorisation par la montagne -- Monts et Merveilles -- Mythologie unitaire des montagnards : les Allobroges -- La montagne territoire du héros -- La Montagne en jupon : transgression ou normalisation ? -- Fête sauvage -- La montagne comme théâtre politique -- La montagne entre apothéose, disgrâce et réenchantement.
"Et si la verticalité avait une histoire ? Dans la perception occidentale du monde en trois dimensions, la montagne joua un rôle déterminant. Celui-ci s'affirma à partir de la Renaissance, lorsque les Alpes et les Andes virent défiler des dizaines de milliers d'individus, simples mercenaires comme princes ou même rois, qui rêvaient de conquêtes à la hauteur de celles d'Alexandre et d'Hannibal. Parce que la montagne est "scabreuse, pierreuse, montueuse, infertile, mal plaisante à l'oeil, très difficile aux pieds", comme l'écrit Rabelais, elle s'éprouve jusque dans la chair. Elle est le lieu de l'initiation, de la conversion et de la transfiguration. Loin d'être le territoire du retard et du barbare que l'on prétendait, la montagne fut surtout le lieu du dépassement, de la réformation de l'oeil et de l'esprit, qui participèrent de l'élan de la Renaissance. La verticalité traversée et vaincue devint un état d'esprit fait d'audace, d'ambition et d'innovation. Ainsi François Pr, ébloui d'avoir su "trancher les monts" en y conduisant chevaliers et canons avant de triompher à Marignan, ou Cortès, ordonnant de faire l'ascension du Popocatépetl avant de prendre Mexico. Selon l'usage que les souverains ou les peuples en firent, la montagne fit saillir des identités nouvelles, elle façonna les imaginaires, contribua à modifier les pratiques et les cultures politiques de l'Europe moderne. Et les montagnards naquirent pour eux-mêmes, défendant leur territoire face aux sarcasmes des hommes des plaines. Du légendaire Guillaume Tell au chevalier Bayard, de l'amazone Philis de la Charce aux fées francoprovençales, la montagne devint un territoire revendiqué et valorisé, forgeant des "identités verticales", tant chez les redoutables Suisses que chez les équivoques ducs de Savoie, qui la déclinèrent en poèmes et en somptueux ballets de cour. En faisant cheminer l'homme entre ciel et terre, entre arêtes et précipices, entre effondrement physique et extase mystique, la verticalité de la montagne est en soi un chemin "montant descendant", susceptible de transformer l'homme en profondeur. Elle s'impose à nous comme une magnifique allégorie de la Renaissance, sinon de la vie elle-même."--Page 4 of cover.
Green Library
Book
xxi, 731 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), maps (chiefly color) ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Rainfall Probability Distribution Analysis in Selected Lateral Command Area of Upper Krishna Project (Karnataka), India, by N.K. Rajeshkumar.- 2. Analyzing Rainfall and Reservoir Release Pattern for Ajwa Reservoir - A Case Study, by Pushkar Sharma.- 3. Preliminary Investigations on Localized Rainfall Interception Losses Under Real Field Observations, by M. L. Gaur.- 4. Probabilistic Estimation of Design Daily Runoff from Bamhani Watershed, India by Sarita Gajbhiye Meshram.- 5. Development of Generalized Higher-Oder Neural Network Based Models for Estimating Pan Evaporation, by Sirisha Adamala.- 6. Sensitivity Analysis of FAO-56 Penman-Monteith Reference Evapotranspiration Estimates Using Monte-Carlo Simulations, by Gicy M. Kovoor.- 7. Quantification of Error in Estimation of Reference Crop Evapotranspiration by Class A Pan and its Correction, by S. Praharaj.- 8. Spatial and Temporal Analyses of Impervious Surface Area on Hydrological Regime of Urban Watersheds, by Tauseef A. Ansari.- 9. An Assessment of Hydrological Impacts Due to Changes in the Urban Sprawl in Bhopal City and ITS Peripheral Urban-Rural Fringe, by L Patel.- 10. Simulation of Urban Drainage System Using Disaggregated Rainfall Data, by Vinay Ashok Rangari.- 11. Investigation of Drainage for Structures, Lithology and Priority (Flood & Landslide) Assessment Using Geospatial Technology, J&K NW Himalaya, by Umair Ali.- 12. Hydrologic Design Parameters Database for Water Harvesting Structures in Madhya Pradesh, by Ramadhar Singh.- 13. Application of Storm Water Management Model to an Urban Catchment, by V Swathi.- 14. A Study of Erosional Depositional Activity and Land Use Mapping of Majuli River Island Using Landsat Data, by Dipsikha Devi.- 15. Study of Soil Erosion and Deposition Around an Island in a Natural Stream, by Snighdhadip Ghosh.- 16. Impact Assessment of Alternate Land Cover and Management Practices on Soil Erosion: A Case Study, by T.R. Nayak.- 17. Geostatistical Analysis of River Sedimentation Behaviour in Kerala State, by Mathew K. Jose.- 18. Study of Mineralogical composition of sediment in Brahmaputra River in Urban stretch of Guwahati city, Assam, India, by Mamata Das.- 19. Hypsometric Analysis for Assessing Erosion Status of Watershed Using Geographical Information System, by S.K. Sharma.- 20. Assessment of Different Bathymetry Statistical Models Usinglandsat-8 Multispectral Images, by Omar Makboul.- 21. Estimation of Minimum and Maximum Air Temperature using MODIS Remote Sensing Imagery and Geographical Information System (GIS), by Sardhara Bharatkumar.- 22. A RS & GIS Approach for Estimation of Runoff and Soil Erosion in SA-13 Watershed, by H. N. Bhange.- 22. Rainwater Harvesting Structure Site Suitability Using Remote Sensing and GIS, by B.K Gavit.- 23. Land Surface Temperature Estimation Using Remote Sensing Data, by Vijay Solanky.- 24. Watershed Prioritization of Wardha River Basin, Maharashtra India Using Morphometric Parameters: A Remote Sensing and GIS Based Approach, by B. S. Manjare.- 25. Flood Assessment of Lolab Valley from Watershed Analysis Using Remote Sensing and GIS Techniques, by Mannan Bashir Wani.- 26. Delineation of Paleo-Channels in Periyar River Basin of Kerala Using Remote Sensing and Electrical Resistivity Methods by C P Proju.- 27. Application Of Eo-1 Hyperion Data For Mapping And Discrimination Of Agricultural Crops.- 28. Morpho-Mathematical Analysis of Bharar River Basin District Chhatarpur-Central India, by Pradeep Kumar Jain.- 29. Application of Principal Component Analysis for Grouping of Morphometric Parameters and Prioritization of Watershed by Sarita Gajbhiye Meshram.- 30. Velocity Distribution in Vortex Chamber at High Water Abstraction Ratio, by Mohammad Athar.- 31. Performance Appraisal of Friction Factor Estimators, by Abhishek Mishra.- 32. Experimental Investigations of Wave Height Attenuation by Submerged Artificial Vegetation by Beena Mary John.- 33. Developing Rating Curves for Nubia Lake, Sudan, Using RS/GIS, by Mohamed Elsahabi.- 34. A Spreadsheet Approach for Prediction of Rating Curve Parameters, by Javel Alam.- 35. Experimental Study on Role of Emergent Artificial Coastal Vegetation in Controlling Wave Run Up, by Beena Mary John.- 36. Development of Regional Soil Water Retention (SWR) Characteristics, by R. K. Jaiswal.- 37. Revision of Empirical Coefficients of Commonly Used Flood Formulae Using Flow Data from Karnataka Rivers, by Chandramohan T.- 38. Reservoir Inflow Forecasting Using Extreme Learning Machines, by Mukesh Kumar Tiwari.- 39. Quantifying Discontinuity, Connectivity, Variability, and Hierarchy in Overland Flow Generation: Comparison of Different Modeling Methods, by Xuefeng Chu.- 40. Nondimensional UH Based Smoothing of S-Curve Derived UH Oscillations, by P.R. Patil.- 41. Fuzzy-based Comprehensive Evaluation of Environmental Flow Alteration, by Kairong Lin.- 42. Spatial Characters of a Tropical River Basin, Southwest Coast of India, by Girish Gopinath.- 43. Streamflow Estimation Using SWAT Model Over Seonath River Basin, Chhattisgarh, India, by Sabyasachi Swain.- 44. Revisiting the Soil Conservation Service Curve Number Method, by S.K. Mishra.- 45. Hydrological Impacts of Rejuvenating Degraded Hilly Watershed in Shivalik Region by A.K. Tiwari.- 46. Modelling of a River Basin Using SWAT Model by B. Venkatesh.- 47. Performance of The Xinanjiang Model by Ajay Ahirwar.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811058004 20180423
This book contains seven parts. The first part deals with some aspects of rainfall analysis, including rainfall probability distribution, local rainfall interception, and analysis for reservoir release. Part 2 is on evapotranspiration and discusses development of neural network models, errors, and sensitivity. Part 3 focuses on various aspects of urban runoff, including hydrologic impacts, storm water management, and drainage systems. Part 4 deals with soil erosion and sediment, covering mineralogical composition, geostatistical analysis, land use impacts, and land use mapping. Part 5 treats remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) applications to different hydrologic problems. Watershed runoff and floods are discussed in Part 6, encompassing hydraulic, experimental, and theoretical aspects. Water modeling constitutes the concluding Part 7. Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), Xinanjiang, and Soil Conservation Service-Curve Number (SCS-CN) models are discussed. The book is of interest to researchers and practitioners in the field of water resources, hydrology, environmental resources, agricultural engineering, watershed management, earth sciences, as well as those engaged in natural resources planning and management. Graduate students and those wishing to conduct further research in water and environment and their development and management find the book to be of value.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811058004 20180423
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
1 online resource.
  • Series Editor Preface; Contents; Contributors; 1 Morphogenic Setting and Diversity of Processes and Landforms: The Geomorphological Regions of Belgium; Abstract; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Geomorphic Regions in Belgium and Luxembourg; 1.3 Geomorphological Themes; References; 2 An Introduction to the Geology of Belgium and Luxembourg; Abstract; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 The Caledonian Cycle: The Lower Paleozoic Inliers; 2.3 The Variscan Cycle; 2.3.1 The Lower Devonian Detrital Formations; 2.3.2 The Middle Devonian Mixed Carbonate-Detrital Formations
  • 2.3.3 The Upper Devonian Mixed Carbonate-Detrital Formations2.3.4 The Dinantian Carbonates; 2.3.5 The Namurian Detrital Formations; 2.3.6 The Westphalian Coal Measures; 2.3.7 The Variscan Orogeny; 2.4 The Post-orogenic Times; 2.5 The Homoclinal Triassic-Jurassic Series; 2.6 The Cretaceous Cover; 2.7 The Cenozoic; 2.8 Conclusions; Acknowledgements; References; 3 The Climate of Belgium and Luxembourg; Abstract; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Main Climatic Features; 3.2.1 Temperature; 3.2.2 Precipitation; 3.2.3 Other Climatic Features; 3.3 Atmospheric Circulation; References
  • 4 Landscapes and Landforms of the Luxembourg Sandstone, Grand-Duchy of LuxembourgAbstract; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Geological and Geomorphological Background; 4.3 Luxembourg's Little Switzerland and the Wolfsschlucht (Wolf's Gorge); 4.3.1 Cliff and Gorge Formation; 4.3.2 Overview of Weathering Structures in the Sandstone; 4.3.2.1 Large Open Fissures; 4.3.2.2 Dissolution in Calcareous Beds; 4.3.2.3 Elliptical Cavities in the Sandstone; 4.3.2.4 Honeycomb Weathering; 4.3.2.5 Differential Weathering and Erosion; 4.3.2.6 Crust Formation; 4.3.2.7 Rock Overhangs in Creek Valleys
  • 4.4 Luxembourg City in Its Natural Landscape4.5 Conclusion; References; 5 Erosion Surfaces in the Ardenne-Oesling and Their Associated Kaolinic Weathering Mantle; Abstract; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Weathering Mantles; 5.2.1 Geographical and Geological Setting; 5.2.2 Characterization and Dating of Key Ardennian Saprolites; 5.3 Erosion Surfaces in the Ardenne and Oesling; 5.3.1 Geographical and Geological Setting; 5.3.2 Shape and Characteristics of an Erosion Surface; 5.3.3 Identifying an Erosion Surface; 5.3.4 Erosion Surfaces of the Hautes Fagnes Plateau; 5.3.5 Dating a Surface
  • 5.3.6 The Whole Picture: Stepped Surfaces of the Ardenne-Oesling5.4 Erosion Surfaces, Tectonic Uplift, and Denudation Rates in the Ardenne-Oesling; 5.5 Conclusion; Acknowledgements; References; 6 A Unique Boulder-Bed Reach of the Amblève River, Ardenne, at Fonds de Quarreux: Modes of Boulder Transport; Abstract; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Geographical and Geological Settings; 6.3 The Fonds de Quarreux Boulder-Bed Stream Reach; 6.4 Modes of Boulder Transport; 6.4.1 Provenance of the Blocks; 6.4.2 Hydraulic Transport Under Temperate- and Cold-Period Hydrodynamic Conditions
Book
1 online resource. Digital: text file; PDF.
  • Introduction.- General characteristics of Egypt.- The Nile Valley: An Egyptian Originated Valley.- The Nile Delta: A Million Years Complex Delta.- The Great Sand Sea: The Largest Sand Sea in Egypt.- The Great Selima Sand Sheet.- The Qattara Depression: The Deepest Erosional Depression in Africa.- The Dakhla and Kharga Depressions: The longest Prehistoric Heritage record in The Western Desert.- The Fayum Depression: A Desert Depression with a Nile Connection in the Western Desert.- The White Desert of Farafra: A Product of Aeolian, Fluvial and Karst Processes.- The Sandstone Plateaux of Gilf Kebir and Abu Ras of SW Egypt The Eocene Limestone Plateau: The Largest karstified plateau in Central Western Desert.- The Northern Marmarica (El-Diffa) Plateau.- Caves in Egypt.- Playas of the Western Desert: Favourable Prehistoric Sites.- The Circular Forms of Southern Western Desert.- The Carbonate Ridges of the Mediterranean Coast.- The Red Sea.- The Gulfs of Suez and Aqaba.- Sinai Coastal Plains.- North Sinai Dunes.- The Folded Mountains of Northern Sinai.- El-Tih and El-`Egma Plateaux of Central Sinai.- The Sinai Mountains.- The Drainage Systems of Sinai.- Wadi El - `Arish Drainage Basin.- The Red Sea Mountains.- The `Ataqa, El-Ma'aza, and El- `Ababda Plateaux.- The Drainage Systems of the Eastern Desert.- El-Hebal Dune Fields.- Micro-Deltas of The Red Sea Coasts.- Lagoons, Esturies & Sabkhas of the Red Sea Coasts.- Geomorphologic Hazards in Egypt.- Index of Subjects.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319656595 20180403
This book provides a unique reference resource not only for geomorphologists, but for all Earth scientists. It shows how landforms vary enormously across Egypt, from high mountains to endless plains, and presents the vast heritage of forms that have developed under different climates. Richly illustrated with numerous plates and figures, it also includes a bibliography offering exhaustive coverage of the literature.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319656595 20180403
Book
xvi, 179 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 25 cm.
  • Chapter I: Introduction - Amin Shaban and Mouin Hamze Chapter II: Historical View and Future Vision - Iman Abdelal Chapter III: Physical Characteristics of Water Resources of Litani River Basin - Amin Shaban and Ghaleb Faour Chapter IV: Bacteriological and Physicochemical Characteristics of Litani River Water - Nada Nehme and Chaden Yakoub Chapter V: Physicochemical Characteristics of Algal Blooms in Qaraaoun Lake - Ali Fadel and Kamal Slim Chapter VI: Groundwater Quality at the Upper Litani River Basin - Nabi Amacha and Safaa Baydoun Chapter VII: Irrigation Approaches Applied in the Litani River Basin - Ihab Jomaa Chapter VIII: Sustainability of Water Resources in the View of Striking Challenges - Nadim Farajallah and Amin Shaban Chapter IX: The National Plan for Litani River Remediation - Talal Darwich, Mouin Hamze, Amin Shaban, Bilal Jouni and Ghaleb Faour Chapter X: The Role of Litani River in the Development of Lebanon - Selim Katafago Chapter XI: Conclusion and Discussion - Mouin Hamze and Amin Shaban.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319762999 20180604
This book presents a collection of chapters covering research on the Litani River Basin. The Litani River Basin occupies about a quarter of Lebanon's surface area, and it has recently been subject to severe geo-environmental conditions such as water contamination and decreased discharge. This motivated the Lebanese government to take action and start working on the remediation of the river. These actions are also supported by international organizations including the World Bank.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319762999 20180604
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
1 online resource.
  • 1. Design and implementation of a thematic cartographic atlas. 2. Estimation of land use efficiency from indicators derived from the global human settlement layer (GHSL). 3. Characterize the urban morphology via a GIS for the numerical simulation of the urban climate. 4. Potential of airborne optical remote sensing for urban swimming pool mapping. 5. Automation of processing chains for the installation of a wind farm. 6. Assessing the state of ecosystem services: Application to forests for the preservation of water resources in tropical insular environments. 7. Measuring the influence of landscape on biodiversity: approach and implementation with the LecoS plugin of QGIS.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119476696 20180618
  • Introduction xi Chapter 1. Monitoring Coastal Bathymetry Using Multispectral Satellite Images at High Spatial Resolution 1 Bertrand LUBAC 1.1. Definition, context and objective 1 1.2. Description of the methodology 3 1.2.1. Step 1: selection and preprocessing of MSI images 5 1.2.2. Step 2: calibration of the bathymetry inversion model 7 1.2.3. Step 3: preparation and application of the masks 8 1.2.4. Step 4: characterization of the morphological evolution of the main sedimentary structures 9 1.3. Practical application 10 1.3.1. Software and data 10 1.3.2. Step 1: extraction of the region of interest and preprocessing 13 1.3.3. Step 2: calculation of bathymetry 20 1.3.4. Step 3: preparation and application of masks 25 1.3.5. Step 4: characterization of the morphological evolution of the main submarine sedimentary structures 31 1.4. Bibliography 33 Chapter 2. Contribution of the Integrated Topo-bathymetric Model for Coastal Wetland Evolution: Case of Geomorphologic and Biological Evolution of Ichkeul Marshes (North Tunisia) 35 Zeineb KASSOUK, Zohra LILI-CHABAANE, Benoit DEFFONTAINES, Mohammad EL HAJJ and Nicolas BAGHDADI 2.1. Coastal wetland dynamic 35 2.2. Ichkeul marshes wetland 36 2.3. Object-oriented classification method integrating the topo-bathymetric terrain model 39 2.3.1. Construction of the topo-bathymetric DTM 40 2.3.2. Image preprocessing 44 2.3.3. Segmentation 48 2.3.4. Classification 49 2.3.5. Limitations of the methodology 51 2.3.6. Case example of topo-bathymetric transect with the associated vegetation communities 51 2.3.7. Conclusion 53 2.4. From a practical point of view in QGIS 53 2.4.1. Software and data 53 2.4.2. Computation of the topo-bathymetric DTM 55 2.4.3. Image preprocessing 58 2.4.4. Segmentation 65 2.4.5. Classification 71 2.5. Bibliography 76 Chapter 3. Reservoir Hydrological Monitoring by Satellite Image Analysis 77 Paul PASSY and Adrien SELLES 3.1. Context and scientific issue 77 3.1.1. Scientific issue 77 3.1.2. Physical and human context 77 3.1.3. The importance of water resources in Central India 78 3.2. Methods and data set 78 3.2.1. Methods 78 3.2.2. Data set 79 3.2.3. Data set preparation 80 3.3. Extraction and quantification of the Singur reservoir area 82 3.3.1. Calculation of the AWEI Index. 82 3.3.2. Construction of the water land binary raster 83 3.3.3. Vectorization of the binary raster 84 3.3.4. Selection of water polygons 85 3.3.5. Calculation of the water area of the reservoir 86 3.4. Characterization of vegetation 88 3.4.1. Choosing an indicator of the state of vegetation 88 3.4.2. Calculation of the SAVI on the study area 88 3.4.3. Creating a land water mask 89 3.4.4. Statistics of the SAVI land surface index 90 3.5. Automation of the processing chain via the construction of a QGIS model 91 3.5.1. Model setting 91 3.5.2. Construction of the chain of treatments for the extraction of the reservoir 92 3.6. Conclusions 103 3.7. Bibliography 103 Chapter 4. Network Analysis and Routing with QGIS 105 Herve PELLA and Kenji OSE 4.1. Introduction 105 4.2. General notions 105 4.2.1. Definition of a network 105 4.2.2. Network topology 106 4.2.3. Topological relationships 107 4.2.4. Graph traversal example of the shortest path (Dijkstra) 109 4.3. Examples of development and analysis of hydrographic networks 109 4.4. Thematic analysis 111 4.4.1. Introduction 111 4.4.2. Useful data 112 4.4.3. Step 1: verification of network consistency 113 4.4.4. Step 2: routes organization 119 4.4.5. Step 3: alignment of points on a network 121 4.4.6. Step 4: network classification 123 4.4.7. Step 5: stations characterization 124 4.4.8. Step 6: distance calculation between observation points 129 4.4.9. Step 7: upstream path and drainage basins calculation 133 4.4.10. Step 8: downstream path 135 4.4.11. Step 9: calculation of availability areas 140 4.5. Bibliography 144 Chapter 5. Representation of the Drainage Network in Urban and Peri-urban Areas Using a 2D Polygonal Mesh Composed of Pseudo-convex Elements 145 Pedro SANZANA, Sergio VILLAROEL, Isabelle BRAUD, Nancy HITSCHFELD, Jorge GIRONAS, Flora BRANGER, Fabrice RODRIGUEZ, Ximena VARGAS and Tomas GOMEZ 5.1. Definitions and context 145 5.1.1. General context and objectives 145 5.1.2. Derivation of input GIS layers 148 5.1.3. Identification of badly-shaped HRUs and methodology to improve the model mesh quality 149 5.2. Implementation of the TriangleQGIS module and general methodology 153 5.2.1. Used technologies 153 5.2.2. Context and general methodology 153 5.2.3. Structure of the QGIS plugin 155 5.2.4. Basic used library: MeshPy 156 5.2.5. Installation of the plugin in Windows 156 5.2.6. Installation of the virtual box, QGIS plugin and Geo-PUMMA 160 5.3. Illustration of the TriangleQGIS plugin and some Geo-PUMMA scripts 167 5.3.1. Insertion of nodes for long and thin polygons 168 5.3.2. Triangulation using the TriangleQGIS plugin 169 5.3.3. Dissolution of tirangulated elements 178 5.3.4. Effect of the model mesh improvement 181 5.4. Acknowledgments 182 5.5. Bibliography 183 Chapter 6. Mapping of Drought 185 Mohammad EL HAJJ, Mehrez ZRIBI, Nicolas BAGHDADI and Michel LE PAGE 6.1. Context 185 6.2. Satellite data 186 6.2.1. MODIS products 186 6.2.2. Land cover map 187 6.3. Drought index based on satellite NDVI data 187 6.4. Methodology 188 6.4.1. Preprocessing of MOD13Q1 images (step 1) 189 6.4.2. Delimitation of drought zones (steps 2 5) 189 6.4.3. Calculate the area of agricultural, urban and forest zones affected by the drought (step 6) 190 6.5. Implementation of the application via QGIS 191 6.5.1. Download MODIS MOD13Q1 data 191 6.5.2. Preprocessing of MODIS MOD13Q1 data (step 1) 193 6.5.3. Calculate VCI index (steps 1 and 2) 195 6.5.4. Delimitation of drought zones (steps 2 5) 199 6.5.5. Calculation of agricultural, forest and urban areas affected by drought (step 6) 204 6.5.6. Visualization of results (step 7) 206 6.6. Drought map 212 6.7. Bibliography 213 Chapter 7. A Spatial Sampling Design Based on Landscape Metrics for Pest Regulation: The Millet Head Miner Case Study in the Bambey Area, Senegal 215 Valerie SOTI 7.1. Definition and context 215 7.2. The spatial sampling methodology 217 7.2.1. Step 1: quantification of landscape metrics 218 7.2.2. Step 2: sampling plan production 221 7.2.3. Step 3: exportation of selected sampling sites to a GPS 223 7.3. Practical application 223 7.3.1. Software and data 223 7.3.2. Step 1: landscape variables calculation 224 7.3.3. Step 2: sampling plan production 232 7.3.4. Step 3: integrating sampling points into a GPS device 238 7.3.5. Limits of the method 241 7.4. Bibliography 242 Chapter 8. Modeling Erosion Risk Using the RUSLE Equation 245 Remi ANDREOLI 8.1. Definition and context 245 8.2. RUSLE model 246 8.2.1. Climatic factor: rainfall aggressiveness R 248 8.2.2. Topographic factor: slope length and gradient 249 8.2.3. Soil types and land cover factors 251 8.2.4. Estimation of soil losses A 254 8.2.5. Limits of the method considered 254 8.3. Implementation of the RUSLE model 255 8.3.1. Software and data 255 8.3.2. Step 1: R factor calculation 257 8.3.3. Step 2: LS factor calculation 263 8.3.4. Step 3: preparation of the K factor 274 8.3.5. Step 4: C factor creation 275 8.3.6. Step 5: soil loss A calculation from the RUSLE equation 280 8.4. Bibliography 281 List of Authors 283 Index 285 Scientific Committee 289.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786302717 20180618
Our four volumes propose to present innovative thematic applications implemented using the open source software QGIS. These are applications that use remote sensing over continental surfaces. The four volumes detail applications of remote sensing over continental surfaces, with a first one discussing applications for agriculture. A second one presents applications for forest, a third presents applications for the continental hydrology, and finally the last volume details applications for environment and risk issues.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786302717 20180618
Book
247 pages : illustrations, maps, charts ; 24 cm
  • Résilience aux catastrophes et risques environnementaux en république démocratique du Congo : défis et opportunités -- Le concept de résilience face au débat épistémologique continu -- Les défis majeurs de la résilience aux risques environnementaux en RDC -- Une gouvernance tâtonnante des risques environnementaux -- La compréhension mitigée des risques environnementaux -- Le faible investissement dans la gestion des catastrophes et risques environnementaux et renforcement des capacités de résilience des populations -- Un éparpillement d'efforts pour les quelques actions existantes -- Inexistence du système d'alerte précoce aux niveaux provincial et national -- Une difficile mise en oeuvre des cadres d'action de Hyôgo et de Sendai -- Quelles opportunités pour des politiques et stratégies de réduction des risques de catastrophes et le renforcement de la résilience en RDC -- De la création de la plateforme nationale de la réduction des risques en RDC -- Plan d'organisation de secours en cas de catastrophes (Plan ORSEC) -- Le décret n° 025 du 11 septembre 1996 portant création du Conseil de protection civile en RDC -- La conférence internationale sur la résilience aux catastrophes et risques environnementaux en RDC -- La participation de la RDC à la conférence mondiale sur la réduction des risques (Sendai, Japon 2015) -- Vers un modèle de gestion collective des risques environnementaux dans les milieux ruraux du Sud-Kivu à l'est de la RDC -- Résumé -- Abstract -- Cadre conceptuel et méthodologie de l'étude -- Cadre conceptuel -- Le concept de risque environnemental -- Gestion collective des risques environnementaux -- Méthodologie de l'étude -- Présentation du milieu d'étude -- Niveau et méthode d'échantillonnage -- Collecte des données quantitatives -- Collecte des données qualitatives -- L'organisation des réunions de recherche -- Organisation des interviews focalisées -- Démarche de traitement et d'analyse des données -- Résultats et discussions -- Typologie des risques environnementaux : Perception des paysans des milieux ruraux du Sud-Kivu -- Des actions de gestion des risques environnementaux dans les milieux ruraux du Sud-Kivu -- Erosion ravinante intra-urbaine et communautarisation de la lutte à Kinshasa en république démocratique du Congo -- Résumé -- Abstract -- Méthodologie -- Résultats -- Institutions, ONG internationales et leur stratégie -- Acteurs locaux non structurés impliqués dans les sites désinvestis par les pouvoirs publics et les ONG internationales : rôles et logiques d'action -- Populations locales et leur stratégie -- Stratégies de lutte à l'échelle du quartier et leur efficacité -- Stratégies de lutte à l'échelle de la parcelle -- Perception de l'efficacité des techniques de lutte anti-érosive par la population -- Environnements étrangers et risques environnementaux en république démocratique du Congo -- Résumé -- Abstract -- Contexte de l'étude -- Objectifs de l'étude -- Méthodologie-de-la recherche -- La colonisation belge et l'émergence des environnements étrangers en RDC -- Risques environnementaux en RDC -- Pour la gestion communautaire des risques environnementaux en RDC --
  • Repenser le rapport homme-nature en regard philosophique sur la question écologique -- Résumé -- Abstract -- Biosphère et facture anthropique -- Clarification des concepts -- État actuel de la biosphère ou la facture anthropique -- De la pollution de la biosphère -- De la relation Homme-Nature -- Exploitation minière et équilibre de l'écosystème dans le bassin minier du haut-Katanga -- Résumé -- Abstract -- Exploitation minière : nécessité existentielle ? -- De l'impact de l'exploitation minière dans la transformation de la biodiversité et de la vie des populations -- L'exploitation minière et ses impacts -- Impacts socio-environnementaux de l'exploitation minière -- Impacts sur les ressources en eau -- Impacts de l'exhaure des mines -- Impacts de l'exploitation minière sur la qualité de l'air -- Sources mobiles -- Source fixes -- Émissions fugitives -- Bruits et vibrations -- Impacts de l'exploitation minière sur la faune -- Perte d'habitat -- Impacts de l'exploitation minière sur la qualité du sol -- Impacts de l'exploitation minière sur les valeurs sociales -- Impacts de la migration -- Le manque d'accès à l'eau potable -- Impacts sur la santé publique -- Impacts sur les ressources culturelles et esthétiques -- Considérations sur les changements climatiques -- Changement climatique, sécurité alimentaire et aptitudes des terres au Sud-Kivu à l'horizon 2050 -- Résumé -- Méthodologie -- Zone d'étude -- Résultats et discussions -- Paramètres climatiques -- Température -- Précipitations -- Aptitudes des terres du Sud-Kivu -- Le haricot -- Le maïs -- Périurbanisation de la ville de Lubumbashi et l'émergence de l'agriculture périurbaine : conditions de sa résilience -- Résumé -- Abstract -- Vulnérabilité de l'agriculture périurbaine -- Des conditions de résilience de l'agriculture périurbaine -- Erosions, adoption des innovations agricoles et sécurité alimentaire : pour quelles incidences à Kabare? -- Résumé -- Abstract -- Contexte et position du problème -- Importance et objectifs de l'étude -- Soubassement méthodologique de l'étude -- Système global -- Esquisse descriptive de la zone d'étude -- Climat, sol, végétation et relief -- Aspects sociodémographiques -- Modalités d'acquisition des terres -- L'Agriculture -- Subdivision et organisation du territoire de Kabare -- Comprendre l'érosion des sols : ses causes et ses manifestations illustratives -- Présentation et discussions des résultats de l'étude -- Ciblage des sites d'enquête et répartition de l'échantillon -- Analyse des éléments à la base de la survenance des érosions à Kabare centre et des mécanismes locaux de résilience subséquente -- Incidences des érosions sur la sécurité alimentaire à Kabare -- Action publique de gestion durable des risques et catastrophes naturelles et d'origine anthropique en RDC -- Résumé -- Abstract -- Le problème -- Hypothèse de travail -- Méthodologie -- Faible capacité de gestion de l'environnement par le système politique congolais -- Les politiques publiques de développement économique -- Le Plan Mobutu (1977-1985)
  • Le ler Plan quinquennal de développement économique et social (1986-1990) -- Le Programme d'action du Gouvernement de Transition (1990-1997) -- Le Plan Triennal (1997-1999) actualisé pour 1999-2001 -- Le Programme d'action du Gouvernement (2012-2016) -- Financement insuffisant des politiques de gestion de l'environnement -- Interventions limitées des acteurs non étatiques -- Dysfonctionnement de l'administration -- L'action publique de gestion durable des risques des catastrophes -- Le Programme gouvernemental de gestion durable des risques des catastrophes -- Synergie entre acteurs politiques et scientifiques -- Administration publique revitalisée -- Appropriation publique des actions des acteurs sociaux -- Implication des populations locales et de la société civile -- La consommation de charbon de bois dans les ménages de la ville de Bukavu et la déforestation périphérique -- Question de recherche -- Objectifs général et spécifiques -- Revue des concepts -- Méthodologie -- La pré-enquête -- L'enquête proprement dite -- L'expérimentation -- Analyses statistiques utilisées -- Détermination de la consommation de charbon de bois dans les trois communes de la ville -- Estimation de la surface de forêt/boisement perdue annuellement pour la production de charbon de bois consommée dans la ville de Bukavu -- Résultats -- Répartition des ménages et caractéristiques socio-économiques des personnes enquêtées -- Consommation de charbon de bois dans les ménages de la ville de Bukavu -- Quantité moyenne de charbon de bois consommée dans la ville de Bukavu -- Masse moyenne de sac de charbon de bois dans les trois communes de Bukavu -- Taux de forêt déboisée pour la production de charbon de bois consommé par les ménages des trois communes de la ville de Bukavu -- Les quantités de charbon de bois converties en étendue de forêt/boisement perdue -- La carbonisation par la méthode artisanale et par la méthode améliorée -- Carbonisation par la méthode artisanale -- Carbonisation par la méthode améliorée -- Discussion -- L'aire de forêt/boisement, en hectares, perdue annuellement pour la production de charbon de bois consommé à Bukavu -- La réflexion sur les modèles de gestions collectives et communautaires des catastrophes et risques environnementaux, et le renforcement de la résilience des populations en RDC. -- La réflexion relative aux rapports entre les changements climatiques, la déforestation, la sécurité alimentaire et les catastrophes environnementales en RDC -- La réflexion sur la pertinence de l'action publique dans la réduction de la vulnérabilité et le renforcement de la résilience face aux catastrophes environnementales en RDC.
"En ouvrant ce livre collectif : La résilience aux catastrophes naturelles et d'origine anthropique en République Démocratique du Congo (RDC), le lecteur est directement orienté sur un terrain absolument vital pour l'humanité, et plus spécifiquement pour la RDC. Les contributeurs s'attèlent à analyser le phénomène des risques et catastrophes environnementaux dans le contexte de la RDC, en insistant sur une prise de conscience collective ainsi qu'une réelle implication de l'État, mais ils proposent également des modèles de leur gestion. Ce livre articule trois niveaux de réflexions notamment : (I) des réflexions sur les modèles de gestion collective des catastrophes et risques environnementaux, et le renforcement de la résilience des populations, (II) des réflexions sur les rapports entre le changement climatique, la déforestation et les catastrophes environnementales en RDC, (III) des réflexions sur la pertinence de l'action publique dans la réduction de la vulnérabilité et le renforcement de la résilience face aux catastrophes environnementales en RDC. Il offre à la connaissance, les différentes manières dont les populations à partir des différents coins du pays, de l'Est à l'Ouest, du Nord au Sud, ont fait face à ce phénomène qui menace à la fois leur existence ainsi que leur environnement de vie."--Page 4 of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)