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Book
xxvi, 354 pages : illustrations, maps / ; 28 cm
A variety of exercises provide flexibility in lab assignments. Each exercise includes key terms and learning concepts linked to Geosystems. The 10th Edition includes more integrated media, including Quick Response (QR) codes linking to Pre-Lab videos. Supported media resources needed for exercises including KMZ files for all of the Google Earth (TM) exercises found in the lab manual.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780134686363 20180213
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
1 online resource (950 p.) : ill. (chiefly col.), maps (chiefly col.).
"This is the proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Asian and Pacific Coasts. The conference focuses on coastal engineering and related fields among Asian and Pacific countries/regions. It includes the classical topics of the coastal engineering as well as topics on coastal environment, marine ecology, coastal oceanography, and fishery science and engineering. The book will be valuable to professionals and graduate students in this field."--Publisher's website.
Book
242 pages : illustrations, maps ; 22 cm
  • Brimstone and fire from out of Heaven : Pompeii, Roman Empire, AD 79
  • Bury the dead and feed the living : Lisbon, Portugal, 1755
  • The greatest catastrophe : Iceland, 1783
  • What we forget : California, United States, 1861-1862
  • Finding faults : Tokyo-Yokohama, Japan, 1923
  • When the levee breaks : Mississippi, United States, 1927
  • Celestial disharmony : Tangshan, China, 1976
  • Disasters without borders : the Indian Ocean, 2004
  • A study in failure : New Orleans, Louisiana, United States, 2005
  • To court disaster: L'Aquila, Italy, 2009
  • The Island of Ill Fortune : Tohoku, Japan, 2011
  • Resilience by design : Los Angeles, California, sometime in the future.
"By the world-renowned seismologist, a surprising history of natural disasters, their impact on our culture, and new ways of thinking about the ones to come Earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, volcanoes--these all stem from the same forces that give our planet life. It is only when they exceed our ability to withstand them that they become disasters. Viewed together, these events have shaped our cities and their architecture; elevated leaders and toppled governments; influenced the way we think, feel, fight, unite, and pray. The history of natural disasters is a history of ourselves. In The Big Ones, renowned seismologist Dr. Lucy Jones offers a bracing look at some of our most devastating natural events, whose reverberations we continue to feel today. Spanning from the destruction of Pompeii in AD 79 to the hurricanes of 2017, it considers disaster's role in the formation of our religions; exposes the limits of human memory; and demonstrates the potential of globalization to humanize and heal. With temperatures rising around the world, natural disasters are striking with greater frequency than ever before. More than just history or science, The Big Ones presents a call to action. Natural hazards are inevitable; human catastrophes are not. With this energizing and exhaustively researched book, Dr. Jones offers a look at our past, readying us to face down the Big Ones in our future"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (x, 411 pages) : illustrations (chiefly color), maps (chiefly color).
  • â The Greenbrier Karst.- Geology of the Greenbrier Valley.- Hydrology of the Greenbrier Karst.- Karst Geomorphology.- The Exploration History of the Greenbrier Valley Caves.- The Swago Creek Basin.- The Little Levels and the Hills Creek Basin.- The Friars Hole System.- Caves, Karst, and Science in the Buckeye Creek Cave Watershed.- The Culverson Creek Cave System.- The Contact Caves of Central Greenbrier County.- The Hydrology of the Sinking Creek/Muddy Creek Karst Basin.- Organ Cave.- Caves of the Dickson Spring Basin, Monroe County.- Windy Mouth Cave.- Scott Hollow Cave.- The Laurel Creek Basin and Greenville Saltpeter Cave.- Terrestrial Fauna in the Greenbrier Karst.- The Subterranean Aquatic Fauna of the Greenbrier Karst.- PleistoceneVertebrates from Greenbrier Valley Caves.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319658001 20180514
The focus of this book is on the more than 2000 caves of the Greenbrier Valley of West Virginia of which the 14 with lengths greater than 10 km have an aggregate length of 639 km. The major caves form the core part of sub-basins which drain to big springs and ultimately to the Greenbrier River. Individual chapters of this book describe each of the major caves and its associated drainage basin. The caves are formed in the Mississippian Greenbrier Limestone in a setting of undulating gentle folds. Fractures, lineaments and confining layers within the limestone are the main controlling factors. The caves underlie an extensive sinkhole plain which may relate to a major erosion surface. The caves are habitat for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms which are cataloged and described as are the paleontological remains found in some of the caves. The sinkhole plain of the Greenbrier karst and the underlying complex of cave systems are the end result of at least a ten million year history of landscape evolution which can be traced through the evolving sequence of cave passages and which is described in this book.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319658001 20180514
EBSCOhost Access limited to 1 user
Book
1 online resource.
  • Part 1. Background and Setting.- Chapter 1. Geographic Extent and Characteristics of the World's Drylands and Their Peoples.- Chapter 2. Recent Trends in Drylands and Future Scope for Advancement.- Chapter 3. Global Change and its Consequences for the World's Arid Lands.- Part 2. Arid lands under a global change regime.- Chapter 4. Humans as Change Agents in Drylands (With Special Reference to Qinghai- Tibet Plateau).- Chapter 5. Climate Variability and Impact on Livelihoods in the Cold Arid Tibet Plateau.- Chapter 6. Iran's Arid Zone Watershed Protection Initiative.- Chapter 7. Thar Desert -- Its Land Management, Livelihoods and Prospects in a Global Warming Scenario.- Part 3. Northern Hemisphere Aridlands: Selected Examples.- Chapter 8. Dry Lands of North America - Current Status and Future Prospects.- Chapter 9. Desertification and Land Degradation in Indian Sub Continent: Issues, Present Status and Future Challenges. Chapter 10. China's Drylands -Problems Prospects.- Chapter 11. Aridlands of North Africa and the Mediterranean Basin - Current Status and Future Prospects.- Part 4. Southern Hemisphere Aridlands: Selected Examples.- Chapter 12. Southern African Drylands -- Current Status and Future Prospects.- Chapter 13. Arid and Semiarid Rangelands of Argentina.- Chapter 14. The Impact of Climate Variability on Land use and Livelihoods in Australia's Rangelands.- Part 5. Summary, Synthesis and Concluding Remarks.- Chapter 15. Drylands Under a Climate Change Regime: Implications for the Land and the Pastoral People they Support.- Chapter 16. Unifying concepts, synthesis and conclusions.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319566801 20180521
This edited volume is devoted to the examination of the implications of the inevitable changes wrought by global change on the welfare and livelihoods of tens of millions of people who live in dryland regions. Global change is more than just climate change and the ramifications of changing trade patterns (geopolitical and economic aspects), the shift to the market economy, demographic factors (population growth, urbanization and re-settlement), receive attention here. Land use change specialists, policy makers and natural resource management agencies will find the book very useful. Chapters focus on examples that are drawn from a number of sources including previously unpublished studies on the impact of climate change, markets and economics on pastoralist and dryland farming households. The key focus is to provide readers with insights into the real world implications of change (including an analysis of the drivers of change) on these vulnerable groups within dryland societies. The role of humans as agents of these changes is canvassed. A regional analysis of the world's drylands is also performed including those in Australia, Argentina, India, North America, China, North Africa, Central Asia and Southern Africa.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319566801 20180521
ProQuest Ebook Central Access limited to 1 user
Book
1 online resource : illustrations, maps.
Book
1 online resource : illustrations, map.
Book
404 pages : illustrations (some color), maps ; 23 cm
Green Library
Book
xxiii, 288 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Coral reef systems as a tourism resource / Anja Pabel and Bruce Prideaux
  • Coral reefs: impacts and sustainability in the South Pacific islands / Semisi Taumoepeau and Anja Pabel
  • Coral based tourism in Egypt's Red Sea / Nathalie Hilmi, Alain Safa, Stéphanie Reynaud and Denis Allemand
  • Australia's Great Barrier Reef: protection, threats, value and tourism use / Bruce Prideaux and Anja Pabel
  • Strategic Caribbean coral reef tourism management / Dennis J. Gayle and Bernadette E. Warner
  • The potential for coral bleaching to affect long-term destination sustainability / Bruce Prideaux, Anja Pabel, Michelle Thompson and Leonie Cassidy
  • Belize Barrier Reef system: a threatened biodiversity hotspot / Leandra Cho-Ricketts
  • Coral reefs of the Florida Keys: the threats of a changing sea / Roberta Atzori and Alan Fyall
  • Whale shark tourism at Ningaloo Reef: successes, challenges and what's next? / Sarah Duffy, Roger Layton and Larry Dwyer
  • Ecotourism and coral reef restoration: case studies from Thailand and the Maldives / Margaux Y. Hein, Fanny Couture and Chad M. Scott
  • Tourism and fishing in paradise: a case study of the Maldives / Kelsey Miller
  • A narrative approach to understanding recreational dive tourists' experiences on coral reefs / Anja Pabel
  • Tourist satisfaction and expenditures in a reef-adjoining dolphin watching industry in Lovina, Bali Indonesia / Putu L Mustika, Riccardo Welters and Naneng Setiasih
  • Tourism development and impacts on reef conservation in Brazil / Fernanda de Vasconcellos Pegas, Guy Castley and Ambrozio Queiroz Neto
  • Impacts of vessel-based day tours on coral reefs: Observations from snorkel tours in Maui, Hawai'i / Brooke A. Porter
  • Indigenous coral reef tourism / Henrietta L. Marrie
  • Media in coral reef tourism management: indications from online travel magazines / Anja Pabel and Glen Croy
  • Findings and Research Issues: where to from here? / Bruce Prideaux and Anja Pabel.
"Coral reefs are important destinations and resources for tourism and bring various benefits to local communities. However they are under increasing threat from climate change and its related impacts such as coral bleaching and ocean acidification, as well as from human activities. This book adopts a multidisciplinary approach to review these issues as they relate to the sustainable management of coral reefs, with case studies of all of the main coral reef systems of the world"-- Provided by publisher.
Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Book
l, 593 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
This book answers key questions about environment, people and their shared future in deltas. It develops a systematic and holistic approach for policy-orientated analysis for the future of these regions. It does so by focusing on ecosystem services in the world's largest, most populous and most iconic delta region, that of the Ganges-Brahmaputra delta in Bangladesh. The book covers the conceptual basis, research approaches and challenges, while also providing a methodology for integration across multiple disciplines, offering a potential prototype for assessments of deltas worldwide. Ecosystem Services for Well-Being in Deltas analyses changing ecosystem services in deltas; the health and well-being of people reliant on them; the continued central role of agriculture and fishing; and the implications of aquaculture in such environments.The analysis is brought together in an integrated and accessible way to examine the future of the Ganges Brahmaputra delta based on a near decade of research by a team of the world's leading scientists on deltas and their human and environmental dimensions. This book is essential reading for students and academics within the fields of Environmental Geography, Sustainable Development and Environmental Policy focused on solving the world's most critical challenges of balancing humans with their environments. This book is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319710921 20180806
Green Library
Book
1 online resource ( xi, 305 pages) : illustrations (some color). Digital: text file; PDF.
  • Part I. EDML Facts and Physics
  • 1 Getting Started
  • 2 Antarctica and EPICA
  • 3 The EDML Drilling Site
  • 4 Multiscale Structure of the EDML Core
  • 5 EDML Line-Scan Images. Part II. EDML Visual Stratigraphy Record.
The line-scan images collected in this book represent the most accurate optical record of Antarctic ice cores ever presented, providing an invaluable resource for glaciologists and climate modellers, as well as a fascinating compilation of ice core images for Antarctica enthusiasts. Global warming and the Earth's past climate are the two main reasons for extracting deep ice cores from Antarctica. Indeed, dust particles, aerosols and other climatic traces deposited on the snow surface, as well as the air trapped in bubbles by compacted snow, produce chronologically ordered strata, making the ice from Antarctica the most accurate and valuable archive of the Earth's climate over the last million years. In addition, the layered structure produced by these strata, when revealed by appropriate methods, provides indispensable information concerning the flow and mechanical stability of the Antarctic ice sheet, allowing us to assess the current and future impact of global warming on the melting of polar ice caps with much greater precision.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783662553060 20180521
ProQuest Ebook Central Access limited to 1 user
Book
1 online resource ( xiv, 422 pages) : illustrations (some color).
  • Introduction.- Rainfall and floods.- Floods and drainage basin features.- Hydrograph and unit hydrograph analysis.- Rational flood methodologies.- Probability and statistical methods.- Flood design discharge and its significance.- Climate change impact on floods.- Flood safety and hazard.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319523552 20180521
This book draws on the author's professional experience and expertise in humid and arid regions to familiarize readers with the basic scientific philosophy and methods regarding floods and their impacts on human life and property. The basis of each model, algorithm and calculation methodology is presented, together with logical and analytical strategies. Global warming and climate change trends are addressed, while flood risk assessments, vulnerability, preventive and mitigation procedures are explained systematically, helping readers apply them in a rational and effective manner. Lastly, real-world project applications are highlighted in each section, ensuring readers grasp not only the theoretical aspects but also their concrete implementation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319523552 20180521
ProQuest Ebook Central Access limited to 1 user
Book
1 online resource (431 pages) : illustrations, tables
  • Introduction.- Rainfall and floods.- Floods and drainage basin features.- Hydrograph and unit hydrograph analysis.- Rational flood methodologies.- Probability and statistical methods.- Flood design discharge and its significance.- Climate change impact on floods.- Flood safety and hazard.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319523552 20180521
This book draws on the author's professional experience and expertise in humid and arid regions to familiarize readers with the basic scientific philosophy and methods regarding floods and their impacts on human life and property. The basis of each model, algorithm and calculation methodology is presented, together with logical and analytical strategies. Global warming and climate change trends are addressed, while flood risk assessments, vulnerability, preventive and mitigation procedures are explained systematically, helping readers apply them in a rational and effective manner. Lastly, real-world project applications are highlighted in each section, ensuring readers grasp not only the theoretical aspects but also their concrete implementation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319523552 20180521
Book
1 online resource (24 pages) : illustrations, photographs.
Book
1 online resource.
  • Part I Introduction and characteristics of permafrost 1 Definition and description 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Additional terms originating in Russia 1.3 History of permafrost research 1.4 Measurement of ground temperature 1.5 Conduction, convection and advection 1.6 Thermal regimes in regions based on heat conduction 1.7 Continentality index 1.8 Moisture movement in the active layer during freezing and thawing 1.9 Moisture conditions in permafrost grond 1.10 Results of freezing moisture 1.11 Strength of ice 1.12 Cryosols, gelisols, and leptosols 1.13 Fragipans 1.14 Salinity in permafrost regions 1.15 Organic matter 1.16 Micro-organisms in permafrost 1.17 Gas and gas hydrates 1.18 Thermokarst areas 1.19 Offshore permafrost 2 Cryogenic processes where temperatures dip below 0â ¦C 2.1 Introduction 2.2 The nature of ice and water 2.3 Effects of oil pollution on freezing 2.4 Freezing and thawing of the active layer in permafrost in equilibrium with a stable climate 2.5 Relation of clay mineralogy to the average position of the permafrost table 2.6 Ground temperature envelopes in profiles affected by changes in mean annual ground surface temperature (MASGT) 2.7 Needle ice 2.8 Frost heaving 2.9 Densification and thaw settlement 2.10 Cryostratigraphy, cryostructures, cryotextures and cryofacies 2.11 Ground cracking 2.12 Dilation cracking 2.13 Frost susceptibility 2.14 Cryoturbation, gravity processes and injection structures 2.15 Upheaving of objects 2.16 Upturning of objects 2.17 Sorting 2.18 Weathering and frost comminution 2.19 Karst in areas with permafrost 2.20 Seawater density and salinity 3 Factors affecting permafrost distribution 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Climatic factors 3.3 Terrain factors 4 Permafrost distribution 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Zonation of permafrost 4.3 Permafrost mapping 4.4 Examples of mapping units used 4.5 Modeling permafrost distribution 4.6 Advances in geophysical methods 4.7 Causes of variability reducing the reliability of small-scale maps 4.8 Maps of permafrost-related properties based on field observations 4.9 Use of remote sensing and aiborne platforms in monitoring environmental conditions and distubances 4.10 Sensitivity to climate change: Hazard zonation 4.11 Classification of permafrost stability based on mean annual ground temperature Part II Permafrost landforms II.1 Introduction 5 Frost cracking, ice-wedges, sand, loess and rock tessellons 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Primary and secondary wedges 6 Massive ground ice in lowlands 6.1 Introduction 6.2 Distribution of massive icy beds in surface sediments 6.3 Sources of the sediments 6.4 Deglaciation of the Laurentide ice sheet 6.5 Methods used to determine the origin of the massive icy beds 6.6 Massive icy beds interpreted as being formed by cryosuction 6.7 Massive icy beds that may represent stgnant glacial ice 6.8 Other origins of massive icy beds 6.9 Ice complexes including Yedoma deposits 6.10 Conditions for growth of thick ice-wedges 6.11 The mechanical condition of the growth of ice-wedges and its connection to the properties of the surrounding sediments 6.12 Buoyancy of ice-wedges 6.13 Summary of the ideas explaining yedoma evolution 6.14 Aufeis 6.15 Perennial ice caves 6.16 Types of ice found in perennial ice caves 6.17 Processes involved in the formation of perennial ice caves 6.18 Cycles of perennial cave evolution 6.19 Ice caves in subtropical climates 6.20 Massive blocks of ice in bedrock or soil 7 Permafrost mounds 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Mounds over 2.5m diameter 7.3 Cryogenic mounds less than 2.5m in diameter 8 Mass wasting of fine-grained materials in cold climates 8.1 Introduction 8.2 Classification of mass wasting 8.3 Slow flows 8.4 Cryogenic fast flows 8.5 Relative effect in moving debris downslope in the mountains 9 Landforms consisting of blocky materials in cold climates 9.1 Introduction 9.2 Source of the blocks 9.3 Influence of rock type 9.4 Weathering products 9.5 Biogenic weathering 9.6 Fate of the sloluble salts produced by chemical and biogenic weathering 9.7 Rate of cliff retreat 9.8 Landforms resulting from the accumulation of predominantly blocky materials in cryogenic climates 9.9 Talus containing significant amounts of finer material 9.10 Cryogenic block streams 9.11 Surface appearance of blocky landforms 10 Cryogenic patterned ground 10.1 Introduction 10.2 Forms of cryogenic patterned ground 10.3 Factors affecting the development of cryogenic patterned ground 10.4 Macroforms of cryogenic patterned ground 10.5 Cryogenic sorted patterned ground 10.6 Identification of active versus inactive forms of macro-sorted patterns 10.7 Microforms of cryogenic patterned ground 11 Thermokarst and thermal erosion 11.1 Introduction 11.2 Causes of thermokarst 11.3 Cavity development in permafrost 11.4 Effect of thermokarst on soil 11.5 Thermokarst landforms 11.6 Thermokarst and thermal erosion along river banks 11.7 Thermal erosion and thermokarst processes along sea coasts 11.8 Processes involved in the erosion of ice-rich arctic coastal sediments 11.9 Importance of coastal erosion of sediments containing permafrost Part III Use of permafrost areas III.1 Introduction 12 The mechanics of frozen soils 12.1 Introduction 12.2 Strains and stresses in the freezing and thawing of soils resulting in frost heaving 12.3 Rheological processes 12.4 Frost susceptibility 13 Foundations in permafrost regions: building stability 13.1 Introduction 13.2 The effect of construction on permafrost stability 13.3 Choice of method of construction 13.4 Building materials 13.5 Timing of construction 13.6 Types of foundations 14 Roads, railways and airfields 14.1 Introduction 14.2 The problems 14.3 Types of roads 14.4 Experimental embankments 14.5 Winter roads 14.6 Environmental effects of winter roads 14.7 Embankment heights 14.8 Unpaved embankments 14.9 Main problems with embankment stability 14.10 Concrete versus ballast railway tracks 14.11 Paving of road and airfield runways 14.12 Use of white paint 14.13 Bridges 14.14 Icings 14.15 Cut slopes 14.16 Airfield construction 15 Oil and gas industry 15.1 Introduction 15.2 Oil and gas exploration 15.3 Drilling rigs 15.4 Production and keeper wells 15.5 Sump problems 15.6 Pipelines 15.7 Monitoring 15.8 Compressor stations 15.9 Pipeline crossings 15.10 Effects of heat advection from producing wells 15.11 Gas hydrates in permafrost ice 16 Mining in permafrost areas 16.1 Introduction 16.2 Placer mining 16.3 Open cast/pit mining 16.4 Underground mining 16.5 Waste materials and tailings ponds 16.5.1 Toxic wastes 17 Provision of utilities 17.1 Introduction 17.2 Water supply 17.3 Waste disposal 17.4 Electric transmission lines 18 Agriculture and forestry 18.1 Introduction 18.2 Zonation of natural vegetation across Siberia 18.3 Zonation of natural vegetation in North America 18.4 Southern and Eastern Kazakhstan, Mongolia and the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau 18.5 The Eichfeld zones 18.6 Asian steppe grasslands and deserts 18.7 The development of modern agriculture in permafrost areas 18.8 Forestry 18.9 Potential effects of climate changes.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351681612 20180521
This book provides a general survey of Geocryology, which is the study of frozen ground called permafrost. Frozen ground is the product of cold climates as well as a variety of environmental factors. Its major characteristic is the accumulation of large quantities of ice which may exceed 90% by volume. Soil water changing to ice results in ground heaving, while thawing of this ice produces ground subsidence often accompanied by soil flowage. Permafrost is very susceptible to changes in weather and climate as well as to changes in the microenvironment. Cold weather produces contraction of the ground, resulting in cracking of the soil as well as breakup of concrete, rock, etc. Thus permafrost regions have unique landforms and processes not found in warmer lands. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 provides an introduction to the characteristics of permafrost. Four chapters deal with its definition and characteristics, the unique processes operating there, the factors affecting it, and its general distribution. Part 2 consists of seven chapters describing the characteristic landforms unique to these areas and the processes involved in their formation. Part 3 discusses the special problems encountered by engineers in construction projects including settlements, roads and railways, the oil and gas industry, mining, and the agricultural and forest industries. The three authors represent three countries and three language groups, and together have over 120 years of experience of working in permafrost areas throughout the world. The book contains over 300 illustrations and photographs, and includes an extensive bibliography in order to introduce the interested reader to the large current literature.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351681612 20180521
ProQuest Ebook Central Access limited to 1 user
Book
1 online resource (810 pages) : illustrations (some color), maps
  • Part I Introduction and characteristics of permafrost 1 Definition and description 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Additional terms originating in Russia 1.3 History of permafrost research 1.4 Measurement of ground temperature 1.5 Conduction, convection and advection 1.6 Thermal regimes in regions based on heat conduction 1.7 Continentality index 1.8 Moisture movement in the active layer during freezing and thawing 1.9 Moisture conditions in permafrost grond 1.10 Results of freezing moisture 1.11 Strength of ice 1.12 Cryosols, gelisols, and leptosols 1.13 Fragipans 1.14 Salinity in permafrost regions 1.15 Organic matter 1.16 Micro-organisms in permafrost 1.17 Gas and gas hydrates 1.18 Thermokarst areas 1.19 Offshore permafrost 2 Cryogenic processes where temperatures dip below 0â ¦C 2.1 Introduction 2.2 The nature of ice and water 2.3 Effects of oil pollution on freezing 2.4 Freezing and thawing of the active layer in permafrost in equilibrium with a stable climate 2.5 Relation of clay mineralogy to the average position of the permafrost table 2.6 Ground temperature envelopes in profiles affected by changes in mean annual ground surface temperature (MASGT) 2.7 Needle ice 2.8 Frost heaving 2.9 Densification and thaw settlement 2.10 Cryostratigraphy, cryostructures, cryotextures and cryofacies 2.11 Ground cracking 2.12 Dilation cracking 2.13 Frost susceptibility 2.14 Cryoturbation, gravity processes and injection structures 2.15 Upheaving of objects 2.16 Upturning of objects 2.17 Sorting 2.18 Weathering and frost comminution 2.19 Karst in areas with permafrost 2.20 Seawater density and salinity 3 Factors affecting permafrost distribution 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Climatic factors 3.3 Terrain factors 4 Permafrost distribution 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Zonation of permafrost 4.3 Permafrost mapping 4.4 Examples of mapping units used 4.5 Modeling permafrost distribution 4.6 Advances in geophysical methods 4.7 Causes of variability reducing the reliability of small-scale maps 4.8 Maps of permafrost-related properties based on field observations 4.9 Use of remote sensing and aiborne platforms in monitoring environmental conditions and distubances 4.10 Sensitivity to climate change: Hazard zonation 4.11 Classification of permafrost stability based on mean annual ground temperature Part II Permafrost landforms II.1 Introduction 5 Frost cracking, ice-wedges, sand, loess and rock tessellons 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Primary and secondary wedges 6 Massive ground ice in lowlands 6.1 Introduction 6.2 Distribution of massive icy beds in surface sediments 6.3 Sources of the sediments 6.4 Deglaciation of the Laurentide ice sheet 6.5 Methods used to determine the origin of the massive icy beds 6.6 Massive icy beds interpreted as being formed by cryosuction 6.7 Massive icy beds that may represent stgnant glacial ice 6.8 Other origins of massive icy beds 6.9 Ice complexes including Yedoma deposits 6.10 Conditions for growth of thick ice-wedges 6.11 The mechanical condition of the growth of ice-wedges and its connection to the properties of the surrounding sediments 6.12 Buoyancy of ice-wedges 6.13 Summary of the ideas explaining yedoma evolution 6.14 Aufeis 6.15 Perennial ice caves 6.16 Types of ice found in perennial ice caves 6.17 Processes involved in the formation of perennial ice caves 6.18 Cycles of perennial cave evolution 6.19 Ice caves in subtropical climates 6.20 Massive blocks of ice in bedrock or soil 7 Permafrost mounds 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Mounds over 2.5m diameter 7.3 Cryogenic mounds less than 2.5m in diameter 8 Mass wasting of fine-grained materials in cold climates 8.1 Introduction 8.2 Classification of mass wasting 8.3 Slow flows 8.4 Cryogenic fast flows 8.5 Relative effect in moving debris downslope in the mountains 9 Landforms consisting of blocky materials in cold climates 9.1 Introduction 9.2 Source of the blocks 9.3 Influence of rock type 9.4 Weathering products 9.5 Biogenic weathering 9.6 Fate of the sloluble salts produced by chemical and biogenic weathering 9.7 Rate of cliff retreat 9.8 Landforms resulting from the accumulation of predominantly blocky materials in cryogenic climates 9.9 Talus containing significant amounts of finer material 9.10 Cryogenic block streams 9.11 Surface appearance of blocky landforms 10 Cryogenic patterned ground 10.1 Introduction 10.2 Forms of cryogenic patterned ground 10.3 Factors affecting the development of cryogenic patterned ground 10.4 Macroforms of cryogenic patterned ground 10.5 Cryogenic sorted patterned ground 10.6 Identification of active versus inactive forms of macro-sorted patterns 10.7 Microforms of cryogenic patterned ground 11 Thermokarst and thermal erosion 11.1 Introduction 11.2 Causes of thermokarst 11.3 Cavity development in permafrost 11.4 Effect of thermokarst on soil 11.5 Thermokarst landforms 11.6 Thermokarst and thermal erosion along river banks 11.7 Thermal erosion and thermokarst processes along sea coasts 11.8 Processes involved in the erosion of ice-rich arctic coastal sediments 11.9 Importance of coastal erosion of sediments containing permafrost Part III Use of permafrost areas III.1 Introduction 12 The mechanics of frozen soils 12.1 Introduction 12.2 Strains and stresses in the freezing and thawing of soils resulting in frost heaving 12.3 Rheological processes 12.4 Frost susceptibility 13 Foundations in permafrost regions: building stability 13.1 Introduction 13.2 The effect of construction on permafrost stability 13.3 Choice of method of construction 13.4 Building materials 13.5 Timing of construction 13.6 Types of foundations 14 Roads, railways and airfields 14.1 Introduction 14.2 The problems 14.3 Types of roads 14.4 Experimental embankments 14.5 Winter roads 14.6 Environmental effects of winter roads 14.7 Embankment heights 14.8 Unpaved embankments 14.9 Main problems with embankment stability 14.10 Concrete versus ballast railway tracks 14.11 Paving of road and airfield runways 14.12 Use of white paint 14.13 Bridges 14.14 Icings 14.15 Cut slopes 14.16 Airfield construction 15 Oil and gas industry 15.1 Introduction 15.2 Oil and gas exploration 15.3 Drilling rigs 15.4 Production and keeper wells 15.5 Sump problems 15.6 Pipelines 15.7 Monitoring 15.8 Compressor stations 15.9 Pipeline crossings 15.10 Effects of heat advection from producing wells 15.11 Gas hydrates in permafrost ice 16 Mining in permafrost areas 16.1 Introduction 16.2 Placer mining 16.3 Open cast/pit mining 16.4 Underground mining 16.5 Waste materials and tailings ponds 16.5.1 Toxic wastes 17 Provision of utilities 17.1 Introduction 17.2 Water supply 17.3 Waste disposal 17.4 Electric transmission lines 18 Agriculture and forestry 18.1 Introduction 18.2 Zonation of natural vegetation across Siberia 18.3 Zonation of natural vegetation in North America 18.4 Southern and Eastern Kazakhstan, Mongolia and the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau 18.5 The Eichfeld zones 18.6 Asian steppe grasslands and deserts 18.7 The development of modern agriculture in permafrost areas 18.8 Forestry 18.9 Potential effects of climate changes.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351681612 20180521
This book provides a general survey of Geocryology, which is the study of frozen ground called permafrost. Frozen ground is the product of cold climates as well as a variety of environmental factors. Its major characteristic is the accumulation of large quantities of ice which may exceed 90% by volume. Soil water changing to ice results in ground heaving, while thawing of this ice produces ground subsidence often accompanied by soil flowage. Permafrost is very susceptible to changes in weather and climate as well as to changes in the microenvironment. Cold weather produces contraction of the ground, resulting in cracking of the soil as well as breakup of concrete, rock, etc. Thus permafrost regions have unique landforms and processes not found in warmer lands. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 provides an introduction to the characteristics of permafrost. Four chapters deal with its definition and characteristics, the unique processes operating there, the factors affecting it, and its general distribution. Part 2 consists of seven chapters describing the characteristic landforms unique to these areas and the processes involved in their formation. Part 3 discusses the special problems encountered by engineers in construction projects including settlements, roads and railways, the oil and gas industry, mining, and the agricultural and forest industries. The three authors represent three countries and three language groups, and together have over 120 years of experience of working in permafrost areas throughout the world. The book contains over 300 illustrations and photographs, and includes an extensive bibliography in order to introduce the interested reader to the large current literature.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351681612 20180521
Book
xvii, 247 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), color maps ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Delineation of Groundwater Potential Zones in Jaisamand Basin of Udaipur District, by P.K Singh.- 2. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Groundwater Level: A Case Study of Wainganga Sub-basin Nagpur, India, by Chandan Kumar Singh.- 3. Spatio-temporal Variation and Trend Analysis of Groundwater Level in Raipur City, Chhattisgarh, by Sumant Kumar.- 4. Spatio-Temporal Relationship Linking Land Use/Land Cover with Groundwater Level, by Vishwanatha Bhat and Prajwal M.- 5. Groundwater System Modelling and Sensitivity of Groundwater Level Prediction in Indo-Gangatic Alluvia Plains, by Raj Mohan Singh.- 6. Assessing Groundwater Aquifer Vulnerability Using GIS-Based DRASTIC Model Coupling with Hydrochemical Parameters in Granitic Terrain From Southern India by N C Mondal.- 7. An Innovative Technology for Recharging Alluvial Aquifers, by Sujata Ray.- 8. Development of Groundwater Recharge Plan for Bemetara District of Chhattisgarh Using GIS, by M K Tripathi.- 9. Paleochannel Recharge Sources in the Central Godavari Delta, A.P., India By R. Satyaji Rao Yellamelli.- 10. Change of Land Use/Land Cover on Groundwater Recharge in Malaprabha Catchment, Belagavi, Karnataka, India, by Purandara B. K.- 11. Causes and Sources of Groundwater Pollution: A Case Study of Nagpur City, India, by Sahajpreet Kaur Garewal.- 12. Modeling Leachate Migration- Pramada S K.- 13. Assessment of Groundwater Quality and Identification of Hydrogeochemical Process in Hard Rock Terrain by K. Rama Mohan.- 14. Spatial and Temporal Nitrate Transport in Deep Heterogeneous Vadose Zone of India's Alluvial Plain, by Jahageer Tomar.- 15. Riverbank Filtration as a Sustainable Solution for Drinking Water Quality and Quantity Problems in Haridwar, Uttarakhand, by Shashi Poonam Indwar.- 16. A Study of the Characteristics of Groundwater Solute Transport Parameters, by Biswajit Chakravorty.- 17. Prioritization for Management of Groundwater Quality Related Problems of Rajsamand District of Rajasthan, by K K Yadav.- 18. Effect of Biochar Amendment on Nitrate Leaching in Two Soil Types of India, by Anil K. Kanthle.- 19. Seasonal Variation of Groundwater Quality in and Around Laharpur Reservoir Bhopal by Neha Nigam.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811057885 20180226
This book comprises the select proceedings of the International Conference on Water, Environment, Energy and Society. The book is divided into three parts. The first part deals with some aspects of groundwater focusing on delineation of groundwater zones, spatio-temporal variability of groundwater, and aquifer vulnerability. The second part is on some aspects of groundwater recharge, dealing with recharge sources, management of recharge and recharge technology, change of land use / land cover on groundwater recharge. The concluding part covers groundwater quality, encompassing causes and sources of pollution, leachate migration, river bank filtration, variability of quality, assessment and management of quality. The book will be of interest to researchers and practitioners in the field of water resources, hydrology, environmental resources, agricultural engineering, watershed management, earth sciences, as well as those engaged in natural resources planning and management. Graduate students and those wishing to conduct further research in water and environment and their development and management will also find the book to be of value.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811057885 20180226
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
446 pages, 8 page of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.
  • Vivre et regarder : l'enjeu de la perception -- Un paysage à la verticale -- Invisibles verticalités -- Un autre regard : la montagne avec soi -- Élever son regard ou l'enjeu de la contemplation -- La mort venue d'en-haut -- La montagne démoniaque -- Les montagnards entre ours et crétins -- Ethnotypes et régimes politiques -- Déchéance montagnarde et "intramontanité" assumée -- Croire et faire croire : les nouvelles idéologies de la montagne -- Une première "défense" de la montagne -- Un dialogue entre deux identités -- Gouverner en chasseur de chamois : Maximilien de Habsbourg et la montagne -- L'insolence de la montagne : les contre-verticalités suisses -- Des rois de la montagne et par la montagne : la majesté alpine des Savoie -- Montagne confessionnalisée ? -- L'ascension comme édification -- La montagne, espace de conversion -- La montagne terre de mission -- Monter et descendre : les dynamiques de la verticalité -- Vaincre la pente -- Conquête verticale et ambition politique -- Vide -- Humilité -- Vitesse -- L'hiver de la vie : sagesse ou illusion ? -- Double versant et politique de la double vue -- La notion politique des "précipices" -- Circuler : les enjeux du déplacement et du dépassement de soi -- La liminalité du passage "delà les monts" -- Un défi logistique -- Une dynamique de victoire -- Un rite initiatique et politique -- De mauvais chemins pour un mauvais pays -- Un chemin tracé pour la conquête -- Corriger et percer -- La montagne : une frontière impossible ? -- Combattre : les enjeux stratégiques de la montagne -- Des principes acte -- Une première adaptation au milieu naturel ? -- Une prise en compte tactique de la montagne -- Grands principes et guerres minuscules -- La montagne augmentée : réalité et fantasme -- La Barricade : un usage militaire et politique de la montagne -- Du refuge à la petite guerre -- Rêver : les enjeux de l'imaginaire, entre identité et valorisation par la montagne -- Monts et Merveilles -- Mythologie unitaire des montagnards : les Allobroges -- La montagne territoire du héros -- La Montagne en jupon : transgression ou normalisation ? -- Fête sauvage -- La montagne comme théâtre politique -- La montagne entre apothéose, disgrâce et réenchantement.
"Et si la verticalité avait une histoire ? Dans la perception occidentale du monde en trois dimensions, la montagne joua un rôle déterminant. Celui-ci s'affirma à partir de la Renaissance, lorsque les Alpes et les Andes virent défiler des dizaines de milliers d'individus, simples mercenaires comme princes ou même rois, qui rêvaient de conquêtes à la hauteur de celles d'Alexandre et d'Hannibal. Parce que la montagne est "scabreuse, pierreuse, montueuse, infertile, mal plaisante à l'oeil, très difficile aux pieds", comme l'écrit Rabelais, elle s'éprouve jusque dans la chair. Elle est le lieu de l'initiation, de la conversion et de la transfiguration. Loin d'être le territoire du retard et du barbare que l'on prétendait, la montagne fut surtout le lieu du dépassement, de la réformation de l'oeil et de l'esprit, qui participèrent de l'élan de la Renaissance. La verticalité traversée et vaincue devint un état d'esprit fait d'audace, d'ambition et d'innovation. Ainsi François Pr, ébloui d'avoir su "trancher les monts" en y conduisant chevaliers et canons avant de triompher à Marignan, ou Cortès, ordonnant de faire l'ascension du Popocatépetl avant de prendre Mexico. Selon l'usage que les souverains ou les peuples en firent, la montagne fit saillir des identités nouvelles, elle façonna les imaginaires, contribua à modifier les pratiques et les cultures politiques de l'Europe moderne. Et les montagnards naquirent pour eux-mêmes, défendant leur territoire face aux sarcasmes des hommes des plaines. Du légendaire Guillaume Tell au chevalier Bayard, de l'amazone Philis de la Charce aux fées francoprovençales, la montagne devint un territoire revendiqué et valorisé, forgeant des "identités verticales", tant chez les redoutables Suisses que chez les équivoques ducs de Savoie, qui la déclinèrent en poèmes et en somptueux ballets de cour. En faisant cheminer l'homme entre ciel et terre, entre arêtes et précipices, entre effondrement physique et extase mystique, la verticalité de la montagne est en soi un chemin "montant descendant", susceptible de transformer l'homme en profondeur. Elle s'impose à nous comme une magnifique allégorie de la Renaissance, sinon de la vie elle-même."--Page 4 of cover.
Green Library
Book
xxi, 731 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), maps (chiefly color) ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Rainfall Probability Distribution Analysis in Selected Lateral Command Area of Upper Krishna Project (Karnataka), India, by N.K. Rajeshkumar.- 2. Analyzing Rainfall and Reservoir Release Pattern for Ajwa Reservoir - A Case Study, by Pushkar Sharma.- 3. Preliminary Investigations on Localized Rainfall Interception Losses Under Real Field Observations, by M. L. Gaur.- 4. Probabilistic Estimation of Design Daily Runoff from Bamhani Watershed, India by Sarita Gajbhiye Meshram.- 5. Development of Generalized Higher-Oder Neural Network Based Models for Estimating Pan Evaporation, by Sirisha Adamala.- 6. Sensitivity Analysis of FAO-56 Penman-Monteith Reference Evapotranspiration Estimates Using Monte-Carlo Simulations, by Gicy M. Kovoor.- 7. Quantification of Error in Estimation of Reference Crop Evapotranspiration by Class A Pan and its Correction, by S. Praharaj.- 8. Spatial and Temporal Analyses of Impervious Surface Area on Hydrological Regime of Urban Watersheds, by Tauseef A. Ansari.- 9. An Assessment of Hydrological Impacts Due to Changes in the Urban Sprawl in Bhopal City and ITS Peripheral Urban-Rural Fringe, by L Patel.- 10. Simulation of Urban Drainage System Using Disaggregated Rainfall Data, by Vinay Ashok Rangari.- 11. Investigation of Drainage for Structures, Lithology and Priority (Flood & Landslide) Assessment Using Geospatial Technology, J&K NW Himalaya, by Umair Ali.- 12. Hydrologic Design Parameters Database for Water Harvesting Structures in Madhya Pradesh, by Ramadhar Singh.- 13. Application of Storm Water Management Model to an Urban Catchment, by V Swathi.- 14. A Study of Erosional Depositional Activity and Land Use Mapping of Majuli River Island Using Landsat Data, by Dipsikha Devi.- 15. Study of Soil Erosion and Deposition Around an Island in a Natural Stream, by Snighdhadip Ghosh.- 16. Impact Assessment of Alternate Land Cover and Management Practices on Soil Erosion: A Case Study, by T.R. Nayak.- 17. Geostatistical Analysis of River Sedimentation Behaviour in Kerala State, by Mathew K. Jose.- 18. Study of Mineralogical composition of sediment in Brahmaputra River in Urban stretch of Guwahati city, Assam, India, by Mamata Das.- 19. Hypsometric Analysis for Assessing Erosion Status of Watershed Using Geographical Information System, by S.K. Sharma.- 20. Assessment of Different Bathymetry Statistical Models Usinglandsat-8 Multispectral Images, by Omar Makboul.- 21. Estimation of Minimum and Maximum Air Temperature using MODIS Remote Sensing Imagery and Geographical Information System (GIS), by Sardhara Bharatkumar.- 22. A RS & GIS Approach for Estimation of Runoff and Soil Erosion in SA-13 Watershed, by H. N. Bhange.- 22. Rainwater Harvesting Structure Site Suitability Using Remote Sensing and GIS, by B.K Gavit.- 23. Land Surface Temperature Estimation Using Remote Sensing Data, by Vijay Solanky.- 24. Watershed Prioritization of Wardha River Basin, Maharashtra India Using Morphometric Parameters: A Remote Sensing and GIS Based Approach, by B. S. Manjare.- 25. Flood Assessment of Lolab Valley from Watershed Analysis Using Remote Sensing and GIS Techniques, by Mannan Bashir Wani.- 26. Delineation of Paleo-Channels in Periyar River Basin of Kerala Using Remote Sensing and Electrical Resistivity Methods by C P Proju.- 27. Application Of Eo-1 Hyperion Data For Mapping And Discrimination Of Agricultural Crops.- 28. Morpho-Mathematical Analysis of Bharar River Basin District Chhatarpur-Central India, by Pradeep Kumar Jain.- 29. Application of Principal Component Analysis for Grouping of Morphometric Parameters and Prioritization of Watershed by Sarita Gajbhiye Meshram.- 30. Velocity Distribution in Vortex Chamber at High Water Abstraction Ratio, by Mohammad Athar.- 31. Performance Appraisal of Friction Factor Estimators, by Abhishek Mishra.- 32. Experimental Investigations of Wave Height Attenuation by Submerged Artificial Vegetation by Beena Mary John.- 33. Developing Rating Curves for Nubia Lake, Sudan, Using RS/GIS, by Mohamed Elsahabi.- 34. A Spreadsheet Approach for Prediction of Rating Curve Parameters, by Javel Alam.- 35. Experimental Study on Role of Emergent Artificial Coastal Vegetation in Controlling Wave Run Up, by Beena Mary John.- 36. Development of Regional Soil Water Retention (SWR) Characteristics, by R. K. Jaiswal.- 37. Revision of Empirical Coefficients of Commonly Used Flood Formulae Using Flow Data from Karnataka Rivers, by Chandramohan T.- 38. Reservoir Inflow Forecasting Using Extreme Learning Machines, by Mukesh Kumar Tiwari.- 39. Quantifying Discontinuity, Connectivity, Variability, and Hierarchy in Overland Flow Generation: Comparison of Different Modeling Methods, by Xuefeng Chu.- 40. Nondimensional UH Based Smoothing of S-Curve Derived UH Oscillations, by P.R. Patil.- 41. Fuzzy-based Comprehensive Evaluation of Environmental Flow Alteration, by Kairong Lin.- 42. Spatial Characters of a Tropical River Basin, Southwest Coast of India, by Girish Gopinath.- 43. Streamflow Estimation Using SWAT Model Over Seonath River Basin, Chhattisgarh, India, by Sabyasachi Swain.- 44. Revisiting the Soil Conservation Service Curve Number Method, by S.K. Mishra.- 45. Hydrological Impacts of Rejuvenating Degraded Hilly Watershed in Shivalik Region by A.K. Tiwari.- 46. Modelling of a River Basin Using SWAT Model by B. Venkatesh.- 47. Performance of The Xinanjiang Model by Ajay Ahirwar.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811058004 20180423
This book contains seven parts. The first part deals with some aspects of rainfall analysis, including rainfall probability distribution, local rainfall interception, and analysis for reservoir release. Part 2 is on evapotranspiration and discusses development of neural network models, errors, and sensitivity. Part 3 focuses on various aspects of urban runoff, including hydrologic impacts, storm water management, and drainage systems. Part 4 deals with soil erosion and sediment, covering mineralogical composition, geostatistical analysis, land use impacts, and land use mapping. Part 5 treats remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) applications to different hydrologic problems. Watershed runoff and floods are discussed in Part 6, encompassing hydraulic, experimental, and theoretical aspects. Water modeling constitutes the concluding Part 7. Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), Xinanjiang, and Soil Conservation Service-Curve Number (SCS-CN) models are discussed. The book is of interest to researchers and practitioners in the field of water resources, hydrology, environmental resources, agricultural engineering, watershed management, earth sciences, as well as those engaged in natural resources planning and management. Graduate students and those wishing to conduct further research in water and environment and their development and management find the book to be of value.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811058004 20180423
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
408 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
For all the desert's dreamlike beauty, to travel here was not just to pitch yourself into oblivion: it was to grind away at yourself until nothing was left. It was to aspire to the condition of sand. One third of the earth's land surface is desert, much of it desolate and inhospitable. What is it about this harsh environment that has captivated humankind throughout history? From the prophets of the Bible to Marco Polo, Lawrence of Arabia to Gertrude Bell, travellers have often seen deserts as cursed places to be avoided, or crossed as quickly as possible. But for those whose call deserts home, the 'hideous blanks' described by explorers are rich in resources and significance. Travelling to five continents over three years, visiting deserts both iconic and little-known, William Atkins discovers a realm that is as much internal as physical. His journey takes him to the Arabian Peninsula's Empty Quarter and Australia's nuclear-test grounds; the dry Aral Sea of Kazakhstan and 'sand seas' of China's volatile north-west; the contested borderlands of Arizona and the riotous Burning Man festival in Nevada's Black Rock Desert; and the ancient monasteries of Egypt's Eastern Desert. Along the way, Atkins illuminates the people, history, topography, and symbolism of these remarkable but often troubled places. Reviving the illustrious British tradition of travel writing, The Immeasurable World is destined to become a classic of desert literature.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780571319732 20180828
Green Library