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Book
xx, 386 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.
  • CHAPTER 1: RESEARCH THEMES IN PACIFIC OCEANIC ARCHAEOLOGY Defining Pacific Oceania Islands as Laboratories, Microcosms, and Model Systems Human-environment Relations Human Migrations Trade and Exchange Coasts and Islands Landscapes and Seascapes Structure of This Book References ã CHAPTER 2 REGIONAL CONTEXT AND PERSPECTIVES Geological Processes: Earth and Ocean Climate and Weather Patterns: More than the Humid Tropics Plant and Animal Communities: Natural and Human-mediated Historical Contexts Linguistic Histories Genetics Lineages Role of Archaeology References ã CHAPTER 3: SUBSTANCE AND SCOPE OF PACIFIC OCEANIC ARCHAEOLOGY Range of Materials and Questions Framework of Cultural Chronologies References ã CHAPTER 4: HUNTER-GATHERER TRADITIONS IN THE WESTERN ASIA-PACIFIC REGION Expedient Chipped Tools Edge-grinding and Other Formal Developments Microliths and Small Flaked Stone Tool Traditions Stemmed Tools Adzes Plant Foods Animal Life Burial Practice Patterns of Resource Use References ã CHAPTER 5: FOLLOWING THE ASIA-PACIFIC POTTERY TRAIL, 4000 THROUGH 800 B.C. Perspectives and Scales of Origins Pottery as a Diagnostic Element of an Archaeological Horizon Possible Early Pottery in Borneo Coastal China Taiwan Philippines Indonesia Mariana Islands Bismarck Archipelago Southern Melanesia and West Polynesia New Guinea Palau Tracking the Pottery Trail References ã CHAPTER 6: FIRST CONTACT WITH THE REMOTE OCEANIC ENVIRONMENT: THE MARIANA ISLANDS AT 1500 B.C. Earliest Marianas Sites Migration and Settlement Process Successful Settlement and Viability Situating Earliest Marianas Settlement in the Asia-Pacific Region References ã CHAPTER 7: A SIEGE OF ECOLOGICAL IMPERIALISM: LAPITA INVASIONS, 1100 THROUGH 800 B.C. Meaning of Lapita? Linguistic Perspective Human Biology and Genetics Transported Landscapes Lapita Contemporaries References ã CHAPTER 8: THE END OF AN ERA: ADJUSTING TO CHANGING COASTLINES, 1100 THROUGH 500 B.C. Coastal Morphologies and Ecologies Shifting Contexts in Nature and Society References ã CHAPTER 9: A BROAD-SPECTRUM REVOLUTION? 500 B.C. THROUGH A.D. 100 Ecological Zones in Large and Small Islands Roles of Fishing, Foraging, and Farming Sustainability, Resilience, and Collapse References ã CHAPTER 10: THE ATOLL HIGHWAY OF MICRONESIA, A.D. 100 THROUGH 500 Early Site Contexts Inter-island Connectivity Contributions of Micronesia in Pacific-wide Voyaging References ã CHAPTER 11: ETHNOGENESIS AND POLYGENESIS, A.D. 500 THROUGH 1000 The Dying Art of Pottery and Other Cultural Transformations Changing House Forms and Settlement Systems References ã CHAPTER 12: AN A.D. 1000 EVENT? FORMALIZATION OF CULTURAL EXPRESSIONS Monuments and Monumental Traditions Indexing and Profiling Monumentality Stonework Villages Everlasting Burials Religious Complexes and Components Linking Lands and Lineages Climate Stability and Instability References ã CHAPTER 13: EXPANSION AND INTENSIFICATION, A.D. 1000 THROUGH 1800 Processes of Expansion and Intensification Expanding to the Margins of Pacific Oceania Field Systems Animal Foods Interaction and Exchange Networks Population Growth and Climate Change Making and Re-making Chiefdoms Warfare Inside and Outside a Globalized Economy References ã CHAPTER 14: LIVING WITH THE PAST: LIFE, LORE, AND LANDSCAPE IN PACIFIC OCEANIA Overview of Trends and Patterns Long-term Continuity and Transformation Future Directions of Enhancing Archaeological Values References ã ã ã ã ã ã ã ã ã ã ã ã ã ã ã .
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138097131 20180514
This book integrates a region-wide chronological narrative of the archaeology of Pacific Oceania. How and why did this vast sea of islands, covering nearly one-third of the world's surface, come to be inhabited over the last several millennia, transcending significant change in ecology, demography, and society? What can any or all of the thousands of islands offer as ideal model systems toward comprehending globally significant issues of human-environment relations and coping with changing circumstances of natural and cultural history? A new synthesis of Pacific Oceanic archaeology addresses these questions, based largely on the author's investigations throughout the diverse region.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138097131 20180514
Green Library
Book
vi, 226 pages : illustration ; 24 cm
  • Polynesia is a project, not a place : Polynesian proximities to whiteness in Cloud atlas and beyond / Maile Arvin
  • Mixed-race Hollywood, Hawaiian style / Camilla Fojas
  • "I no eat dog, k" : humor, hazing, and multicultural settler colonialism / Roderick N. Labrador
  • "Eh! where you from?" : questions of place, race, and identity in contemporary Hawaiʻi / John P. Rosa
  • Race and/or ethnicity in Hawaiʻi : what's the difference and what difference does it make? / Jonathan Y. Okamura
  • The racial imperative : rereading Hawaiʻi's history and Black-Hawaiian relations through the perspective of Black residents / Nitasha Tamar Sharma
  • Local boy, East Coast sensibilities / Christopher Joseph Lopa
  • "Latino threat in the 808?" : Mexican migration and the politics of race in Hawaiʻi / Rudy P. Guevarra Jr.
  • Local haole? : whites, racial and imperial loyalties, and membership in Hawaiʻi / Paul Spickard
  • Reconnecting our roots : navigating the turbulent waters of health-care policy for Micronesians in Hawaiʻi / Joakim Peter, Wayne Chung Tanaka, and Aiko Yamashiro.
Written by scholars of various disciplines, the essays in this volume dig beneath the veneer of Hawai`i's myth as a melting pot paradise to uncover historical and complicated cross-racial dynamics. Race is not the primary paradigm through which Hawai`i is understood. Instead, ethnic difference is celebrated as a sign of multicultural globalism that designates Hawai`i as the crossroads of the Pacific. Racial inequality is disruptive to the tourist image of the islands. It ruptures the image of tolerance, diversity, and happiness upon which tourism, business, and so many other vested transnational interests in the islands are based. The contributors of this interdisciplinary volume reconsider Hawai`i as a model of ethnic and multiracial harmony through the lens of race in their analysis of historical events, group relations and individual experiences, and humor, among other focal points. Beyond Ethnicity examines the dynamics between race, ethnicity, and indigeneity to challenge the primacy of ethnicity and cultural practices for examining difference in the islands while recognizing the significant role of settler colonialism in the islands. This original and thought-provoking volume reveals what a racial analysis illuminates about the current political configuration of the islands and in so doing, challenges how we conceptualize race on the continent. Recognizing the ways that Native Hawaiians or Kanaka Maoli are impacted by shifting, violent, and hierarchical colonial structures that include racial inequalities, the editors and contributors explore questions of personhood and citizenship through language, land, labor, and embodiment. By admitting to these tensions and ambivalences, the editors set the pace and tempo of powerfully argued essays that engage with the various ways that Kanaka Maoli and the influx of differentially racialized settlers continue to shift the social, political, and cultural terrains of the Hawaiian Islands over time.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780824869885 20180514
Green Library
Book
xiii, 307 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • List of tables and figures Acknowledgments List of abbreviations 1. Chapter 1: Introduction: A personal journey - Approaching the topic 2. Chapter 2: Chinese modernity and New Zealand's opening up - Perspectives from both immigrant sending and receiving countries 3. Chapter 3: Re-grounding "transnationalism" in theories and practices 4. Chapter 4: Changing family strategies and onward movements 5. Chapter 5: Conceptualisation of "home", identity, sense of belonging and citizenship 6. Chapter 6: Does the economic factor still matter? - Trans-Tasman migration of new PRC migrants 7. Chapter 7: Point of return - A quantitative data analysis from a comparative perspective 8. Chapter 8: "Local" or "Global"? - Situating Chinese transnational migration in the world migration system and global modernity Appendixes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138218055 20180508
The term `circulatory transnational migration' best describes the unconventional migratory route of many contemporary Chinese migrants - that is an unfinished set of circulatory movements that these migrants engage in between the homeland and various host countries. `Return migration', `step migration' to a third destination and the `astronauting' strategy are all included within this circulatory migration movement wherein `returning' to the country of origin does not always mean to settle back to the homeland permanently; while `step migration' also does not necessarily mean to re-migrate to a third destination country for a permanent purpose. Liu takes a longitudinal perspective to study Chinese migrants' transnational movements and looks at their transnational migratory movements as a family matter and progressive and dynamic process, using New Zealand as a primary case study. She examines Chinese migrants' initial motives for immigrating to New Zealand; the driving forces behind their adoption of a transnational lifestyle which includes leaving New Zealand to return to China, moving to a third country - typically Australia - or commuting across borders; family-related considerations; inter-generational dynamics in transnational migration; as well as their future movement intentions. Liu also discusses Chinese migrants' conceptualisation of `home', citizenship, identity, and sense of belonging to provide a deeper understanding of their transnational migratory experiences.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138218055 20180508
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xix, 405 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vii, 184 pages : illustrations ; 23
  • Acknowledgments 1 Introduction to the Maori 2 Historical Overview of the Esoteric Tradition 3 Deities of the Maori Pantheon 4 Parallels to Dogon Cosmology 5 Mythic Themes of Maori Cosmology 6 Pre-Buddhist and Hindu Influences on Maori Religion 7 Echoes of Gobekli Tepe among the Maori 8 Maori and Tamil Word Correlations 9 Evidence of the Sakti Cult in Maori Culture 10 Symbolic Aspects of Ganesha in Maori Cosmology 11 Ancient Egyptian Word Correlations to the Maori 12 Yah and Maori Concepts of Creation from Light 13 Foundational Philosophies in Maori Cosmology 14 Maori References to the Field of Arou 15 The Wharekura, or School of Reeds 16 Maori Concepts of the Priesthood and Sacred Spots 17 Maori Myth of the Overturning of the Earth Mother 18 Tracks of the Peti and the Papae in New Zealand 19 Symbolism of the Seven Mythic Canoes of the Maori 20 The Sacrifice of the Nummo 21 Putting the Maori References in Context Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781620557051 20180625
An exploration of New Zealand's Maori cosmology and how it relates to classic ancient symbolic traditions around the world New evidence suggests that Maori culture of New Zealand is most likely centuries older than previously believed. The roots can be traced back to the archaic Goebekli Tepe site in Turkey, built around 10,000 BC. Extending his global cosmology comparisons to New Zealand, Laird Scranton shows how the same cosmological concepts and linguistic roots that began at Goebekli Tepe are also evident in Maori culture and language. These are the same elements that underlie Dogon, ancient Egyptian, and ancient Chinese cosmologies as well as the Sakti Cult of India (a precursor to Vedic, Buddhist, and Hindu traditions) and the Neolithic culture of Orkney Island in northern Scotland. While the cultural and linguistic roots of the Maori are distinctly Polynesian, the author shows how the cosmology in New Zealand was sheltered from outside influences and likely reflects ancient sources better than other Polynesian cultures. In addition to shared creation concepts, he details a multitude of strikingly similar word pronunciations and meanings, shared by Maori language and the Dogon and Egyptian languages, as well as likely connections to various Biblical terms and traditions. He discusses the Maori use of standing stones to denote spiritual spaces and sanctuaries and how their esoteric mystery schools are housed in structures architecturally similar to those commonly found in Ireland. He discusses the symbolism of the Seven Mythic Canoes of the Maori and uncovers symbolic aspects of the elephant-headed Hindu god Ganesha in Maori cosmology. The author also explores the outwardly similar pygmy traditions of Ireland and New Zealand, characterized by matching fairy mound constructions and mythic references in both regions. He reveals how the trail of a group of Little People who vanished from Orkney Island in ancient times might be traced first to Scotland, Ireland, and England and then on to New Zealand, accompanied by signature elements of the global cosmology first seen at Gobekli Tepe.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781620557051 20180625
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xviii, 220 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Throwing mangoes at tourists
  • How to do things with aloha
  • F-you aloha, I love you
  • Bloodline is all I need and defiant indigeneity on the West Side
  • Aloha in drag
  • The afterlife of Princess Ka'iulani
  • Bound in place: queer indigenous mobilities and "the old paniolo way"
  • Aloha as social connection.
Aloha"" is at once the most significant and the most misunderstood word in the Indigenous Hawaiian lexicon. For Kanaka Maoli people, the concept of ""aloha"" is a representation and articulation of their identity, despite its misappropriation and commandeering by non-Native audiences in the form of things like the ""hula girl"" of popular culture. Considering the way aloha is embodied, performed, and interpreted in Native Hawaiian literature, music, plays, dance, drag performance, and even ghost tours from the twentieth century to the present, Stephanie Nohelani Teves shows that misunderstanding of the concept by non-Native audiences has not prevented the Kanaka Maoli from using it to create and empower community and articulate its distinct Indigenous meaning. While Native Hawaiian artists, activists, scholars, and other performers have labored to educate diverse publics about the complexity of Indigenous Hawaiian identity, ongoing acts of violence against Indigenous communities have undermined these efforts. In this multidisciplinary work, Teves argues that Indigenous peoples must continue to embrace the performance of their identities in the face of this violence in order to challenge settler-colonialism and its efforts to contain and commodify Hawaiian Indigeneity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469640556 20180514
Green Library
Book
ix, 206 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of Figures and Maps Acknowledgments Introduction: New Promises, Old Problems Chapter 1. Ethno-Racial and Political Dreams of Education in Wamena Chapter 2. 'Newcomers' and 'Masters of the Land' in North Sulawesi Chapter 3. Stigma, Fear, and Shame: Dani Encounters with Racial and Political Formations in North Sulawesi Chapter 4. 'Discipline is Important': Aspirations and Encounters on Campus Chapter 5. Belonging, Expertise and Conflict in Highlanders' Social World Abroad Chapter 6. 'Study First': Sexuality, Pregnancy, and Survival Chapter 7. Doing Good Things in a Dani Modernity Conclusion: Koteka Questions Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781785336843 20180625
For the last 53 years, the Dani of the central highlands of West Papua, along with other Papuans, have struggled under the oppressive and violent conditions of Indonesian rule. Formal education holds the promise of escape from this stigmatization. Dreams Made Small offers an in-depth, ethnographic look at journeys of education among young Dani men and women, asking us to think differently about education as a trajectory for national belonging, and ultimately revealing how dreams of transformation, equality, and belonging are shaped and reshaped in the face of multiple constraints.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781785336843 20180625
Green Library
Book
xvi, 301 pages ; 24 cm
  • Preface: Region, Position, and Ethics of Representation Introduction: Persistent Difference Chapter 1. Nobodies and Relatives: Nonrecognition and Identification in Social Process Chapter 2. Imitation as Relationality in Early Australian Encounters Chapter 3. Mediations Chapter 4. Treachery and Boundary Demarcation Chapter 5. Cruelty and a Different Recognition Chapter 6. Race, Recognition, State, and Society Chapter 7. The Postcolony: Sacred Sites and Saddles Chapter 8. Recognition: A Space of Difference? Notes References Index Acknowledgments.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812250008 20180709
In Dynamics of Difference in Australia, Francesca Merlan examines relations between indigenous and nonindigenous people from the events of early exploration and colonial endeavors to the present day. From face-to-face interactions to national and geopolitical affairs, the book illuminates the dimensions of difference that are revealed by these encounters: what indigenous and nonindigenous people pay attention to, what they value, what preconceived notions each possesses, and what their responses are to the Other. Basing her analysis on her extensive fieldwork in northern Australia, Merlan highlights the asymmetries in the exchanges between the settler majority and the indigenous minority, looking at everything from forms of violence and material transactions, to indigenous involvement in resource development, to governmental intervention in indigenous affairs. Merlan frames the book within the current debate in Australian society concerning the constitutional recognition of indigenous people by the nation-state. Surveying the precursors to this question and its continuing and unresolved nature, she chronicles the ways in which an indigenous minority can remain culturally different while simultaneously experiencing the transformative forces of domination, constraint, and inequality. Conducting an investigation of long-term change against the backdrop of a highly salient and timely public debate surrounding indigenous issues, Dynamics of Difference has far-reaching implications both for public policy and for current theoretical debates about the nature of sociocultural continuity and change.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812250008 20180709
Green Library
Book
xv, 312 pages : illustrations, maps ; 22 cm
Green Library
Book
xii, 147 pages ; 23 cm.
  • 1. Mapping complexity: a transcultural approach.- 2. Historical outline.- 3. Work and socio-economic mobility.- 4. Racism and racial ambiguity in a settler colonial context.- 5. Family and generational negotiations.- 6. Transnational ideologies and transcultural practices.- 7. Concluding remarks.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319788722 20180625
This book provides a concise and innovative history of Italian migration to Australia over the past 150 years. It focuses on crucial aspects of the migratory experience, including work and socio-economic mobility, disorientation and reorientation, gender and sexual identities, racism, sexism, family life, aged care, language, religion, politics, and ethnic media. The history of Italians in Australia is re-framed through key theoretical concepts, including transculturation, transnationalism, decoloniality, and intersectionality. This book challenges common assumptions about the Italian-Australian community, including the idea that migrants are `stuck' in the past, and the tendency to assess migrants' worth according to their socio-economic success and their alleged contribution to the Nation. It focuses instead on the complex, intense, inventive, dynamic, and resilient strategies developed by migrants within complex transcultural and transnational contexts. In doing so, this book provides a new way of rethinking and remembering the history of Italians in Australia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319788722 20180625
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 321 pages : illustrations, portraits ; 22 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
208 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Bold women of the Warlpiri diaspora who went too far / Paul Burke
  • Predicaments of proximity : revising relatedness in a Warlpiri town / Yasmine Musharbash
  • Self-possessed : children, recognition, and psychological autonomy at Pukatja (Ernabella), South Australia / Ute Eickelkamp
  • Reconfiguring relational personhood among Lander Warlpiri / Petronella Vaarzon-Morel
  • The role of allocative power and its diminution in the constitution and violation of Wiradjuri personhood / Gaynor Macdonald
  • Murrinhpatha personhood, other humans, and contemporary youth / John Mansfield
  • Mobility and the education of indigenous youth away from remote home communities / Cameo Dalley
  • We're here to worship god : aboriginal Christians and the political dimensions of personhood / Carolyn Schwarz
  • Empathy, psychic unity, anger, and shame : learning about personhood in a remote aboriginal community / Victoria K. Burbank.
People and Change in Australia arose from a conviction that more needs to be done in anthropology to give a fuller sense of the changing lives and circumstances of Australian indigenous communities and people. Much anthropological and public discussion remains embedded in traditionalizing views of indigenous people, and in accounts that seem to underline essential and apparently timeless difference. In this volume the editors and contributors assume that "the person" is socially defined and reconfigured as contexts change, both immediate and historical.Essays in this collection are grounded in Australian locales commonly termed "remote." These indigenous communities were largely established as residential concentrations by Australian governments, some first as missions, most in areas that many of the indigenous people involved consider their homelands. A number of these settlements were located in proximity to settler industries including pastoralism, market-gardening, and mining.These are the locales that many non-indigenous Australians think of as the homes of the most traditional indigenous communities and people. The contributors discuss the changing circumstances of indigenous people who originate from such places. Some remain, while others travel far afield. The accounts reveal a diversity of experiences and histories that involve major dynamics of disembedding from country and home locales, and re-embedding in new contexts, and reconfigurations of relatedness. The essays explore dimensions of change and continuity in childhood experience and socialization in a desert community; the influence of Christianity in fostering both individuation and relatedness in northeast Arnhem Land; the diaspora of Central Australian Warlpiri people to cities and the forms of life and livelihood they make there; adolescent experiences of schooling away from home communities; youth in kin-based heavy metal gangs configuring new identities, and indigenous people of southeast Australia reflecting on whether an "Aboriginal way" can be sustained. The volume takes a step toward understanding the relation between changing circumstances and changing lives of indigenous Australians today and provides a sense of the quality and the feel of those lives.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780824867966 20180129
Green Library
Book
xiii, 255 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Mai Kahiki Mai: out from Kahiki-- 1. Ke Ao a me Ka Po: post-millennial thought and Kanaka Foreign Mission work-- 2. Among the wild dogs: negotiating the boundaries of Hawaiian Christianity-- 3. A kindred people: Hawaiian diplomacy in Samoa, 1887-- 4. The Hawaiian model: imagining the future of Oceania-- 5. 'There is nothing that separates us': John T. Baker and the Pan-Oceanic Lahui-- 6. Maka'ainana or servants of the dollar? Oceanic and capialist values-- Conclusion: the return to Kahiki.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107195899 20180423
Between 1850 and 1907, Native Hawaiians sought to develop relationships with other Pacific Islanders, reflecting how they viewed not only themselves as a people but their wider connections to Oceania and the globe. Kealani Cook analyzes the relatively little known experiences of Native Hawaiian missionaries, diplomats, and travelers, shedding valuable light on the rich but understudied accounts of Hawaiians outside of Hawai'i. Native Hawaiian views of other islanders typically corresponded with their particular views and experiences of the Native Hawaiian past. The more positive their outlook, the more likely they were to seek cross-cultural connections. This is an important intervention in the growing field of Pacific and Oceanic history and the study of native peoples of the Americas, where books on indigenous Hawaiians are few and far between. Cook returns the study of Hawai'i to a central place in the history of cultural change in the Pacific.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107195899 20180423
Green Library
Book
xii, 249 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
xi, 288 pages ; 22 cm.
  • 1. Introduction.- 2. Symptoms of Empire.- 3. The Waikato War: Rights and Industry.- 4. The Waikato War: Race and Philanthropy .- 5. The Sudan Crisis: Displays of Unity.- 6. The Sudan Crisis: Creating Historical Memories.- 7. The South African War: Trying Again.- 8. The South African War: Points of Fracture.- 9. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319637747 20180129
This book explores how public commentary framed Australian involvement in the Waikato War (1863-64), the Sudan crisis (1885), and the South African War (1899-1902), a succession of conflicts that reverberated around the British Empire and which the newspaper press reported at length. It reconstructs the ways these conflicts were understood and reflected in the colonial and British press, and how commentators responded to the shifting circumstances that shaped the mood of their coverage. Studying each conflict in turn, the book explores the expressions of feeling that arose within and between the Australian colonies and Britain. It argues that settler and imperial narratives required constant defending and maintaining. This process led to tensions between Britain and the colonies, and also to vivid displays of mutual affection. The book examines how war narratives merged with ideas of territorial ownership and productivity, racial anxieties, self-governance, and foundational violence. In doing so it draws out the rationales and emotions that both fortified and unsettled settler societies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319637747 20180129
Green Library
Book
xix, 483 pages : illustrations (some color), maps ; 24 cm
Green Library
Book
xvii, 548 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
"There are no two neighboring countries anywhere in the world that are more different than Indonesia and Australia. They differ hugely in religion, language, culture, history, geography, race, economics, worldview and population (Indonesia, 270 million, Australia less than 10 per cent of that). In fact, Indonesia and Australia have almost nothing in common other than the accident of geographic proximity. This makes their relationship turbulent, volatile and often unpredictable. Strangers Next Door? brings together insiders and leading observers to critically assess the state of Australia-Indonesia relations and their future prospects, offering insights into why the relationship is so important for Australia, why it is so often in crisis, and what this means for the future. This book will be of interest to anyone concerned with the Indo-Pacific region, Southeast Asia, Australia and Indonesia, and each country's politics, economy and foreign policy. It contains chapters that will interest specialists but are written in a style accessible to a general audience. The book spans a diverse range of subjects, including political relations and diplomacy, security and defence, the economy and trade, Islam, education, development, the arts, legal cooperation, the media, women, and community ties. Contributors assess the current state of relations in their sphere of expertise, and outline the factors and policies that could shape bilateral ties - and Indonesia's future - over the coming decades. University of Melbourne scholars Tim Lindsey and Dave McRae, both prominent observers and commentators on Indonesia and its relations with Australia, edited the volume, providing a synthesising overview as well as their own thematic chapters"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
viii, 319 pages : maps ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvii, 430 pages, 20 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

20. An activist life [2017]

Book
343 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)