%{search_type} search results

31,746 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
Book
358 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
344 pages ; 24 cm
Turkey; foreign relations; Arab countries.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
88 pages ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
215 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
171 pages : maps ; 24 cm.
This collection of essays places the Balkans at the center of European developments, not as a conflict-ridden problem zone, but rather as a full-fledged European region. Contrary to the commonly held perception, contributors to the volume argue, the Balkans did not lag behind the rest of European history, but rather anticipated many (West) European developments in the decades before and after 1900. In the second half of the nineteenth century, the Balkan states became fully independent nation-states. As they worked to consolidate their sovereignty, these countries looked beyond traditional state formation strategies to alternative visions rooted in militarism or national political economy, and not only succeeded on their own terms but changed Europe and the world beginning in 1912-14. As the Ottoman Empire weakened and ever more kinds of informal diplomacy were practiced on its territory by more powerful states, relationships between identity and geopolitics were also transformed. The result, as the contributors demonstrate, was a phenomenon that would come to pervade the whole of Europe by the 1920s and 1930s: the creeping substitution of ideas of religion and ethnicity for the idea of state belonging or subjecthood. CONTRIBUTORS: Ulf Brunnbauer, Holly Case, Dessislava Lilova, John Paul Newman, Roumiana Preshlenova, Dominique Kirchner Reill, Timothy Snyder Timothy Snyder is Richard C. Levin Professor of History at Yale University. Katherine Younger is a research associate at the Institute for Human Sciences (IWM) in Vienna, Austria.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781580469159 20180702
Green Library
Book
599 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
383 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
188 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiii, 370 pages ; 24 cm
  • Acknowledgments ixNote on Translation, Transliteration, and Pronunciation xiiiIntroduction 1The Ottomans and the Caliphate 1The Caliphate in the Age of Suleyman 4The Caliphate as a Moral Paradigm 8The Rumi Character of Political Writing 10Outline of the Book 14List of Abbreviations 211 The Discourse on Rulership 22The Age of Angst: Turkish Vernacularism and Political Expression 23The Age of Excitement: From Conquest to Exploration 31The Age of Perfection: From Engagement to Exceptionalism 45Imperial Turkish and the Translation Movement 55Four Ways of Writing on Politics 64Ethics 69Statecraft 75Juristic Perspectives 80Sufistic Visions 89Languages of Political Thought 942 The Caliphate Mystified 97The Ottoman Dawla 97The Contest for the Caliphate 107Rulers and Dervishes 112The Ottoman Dawla Lost and Found 125Converging and Diverging Spheres of Authority 1313 The Sultan and the Sultanate 145Reconciling Visions of Rulership 146The raison d'etre of the Sultanate 150Rulership as Grace from God 156The Nature of the Ruler 167The Question of Morality 173The Status of Rulership among Humankind 1774 The Caliph and the Caliphate 181God's Government 182The Shadow of God on Earth 186Prophethood as Rulership 188The Sultanate as Caliphate 191Prophet's Successor and God's Vicegerent 196Rulership as Mystical Experience 200The Caliphate as Unified Authority 206From Sultanate to the Caliphate 2155 The Myth of the Ottoman Caliphate 218God's Chosen Dynasty 218Mystification of the Origins 228Mehmed II and the Making of the Ottoman Archetype 241Suleyman I and Designing the Ottoman Epitome 251The Seal of the Caliphate 266Conclusion 277Notes 287Glossary 329Bibliography 337Index 357.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691174808 20180205
The medieval theory of the caliphate, epitomized by the Abbasids (750-1258), was the construct of jurists who conceived it as a contractual leadership of the Muslim community in succession to the Prophet Muhammed's political authority. In this book, Huseyin Yilmaz traces how a new conception of the caliphate emerged under the Ottomans, who redefined the caliph as at once a ruler, a spiritual guide, and a lawmaker corresponding to the prophet's three natures. Challenging conventional narratives that portray the Ottoman caliphate as a fading relic of medieval Islamic law, Yilmaz offers a novel interpretation of authority, sovereignty, and imperial ideology by examining how Ottoman political discourse led to the mystification of Muslim political ideals and redefined the caliphate. He illuminates how Ottoman Sufis reimagined the caliphate as a manifestation and extension of cosmic divine governance. The Ottoman Empire arose in Western Anatolia and the Balkans, where charismatic Sufi leaders were perceived to be God's deputies on earth. Yilmaz traces how Ottoman rulers, in alliance with an increasingly powerful Sufi establishment, continuously refashioned and legitimated their rule through mystical imageries of authority, and how the caliphate itself reemerged as a moral paradigm that shaped early modern Muslim empires. A masterful work of scholarship, Caliphate Redefined is the first comprehensive study of premodern Ottoman political thought to offer an extensive analysis of a wealth of previously unstudied texts in Arabic, Persian, and Ottoman Turkish.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691174808 20180205
Green Library
Book
236 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • Deux ethnographes français dans les montagnes orageuses de l'Albanie -- Premier séjour en Albanie -- Deuxième séjour en Albanie -- Personnes rencontrées pendant leurs séjours -- Carte de leurs parcours en Albanie.
"Lorsque Jacqueline et René Bénézech, grands voyageurs et ethnographes convaincus, partirent en direction de l'Europe du Sud et des Balkans au début des années trente, ni l'un ni l'autre n'aurait imaginé combien l'Albanie, au départ une destination de passage, allait marquer leur vie. Malgré les difficultés rencontrées en chemin lors d'un premier séjour en 1931, le couple, passionné par la découverte de ce pays, organise un séjour plus long (du 16 août 1938 au 15 janvier 1939). Ce second voyage sera alors mené dans le cadre d'un accord avec le Musée de l'Homme, qui charge René, photographe, d'étudier les costumes traditionnels portés par les Albanais de l'époque. Un récit extraordinaire rédigé au jour le jour par Jacqueline et des photographies uniques de René Bénézech, conservées aujourd'hui au Musée du quai Branly-Jacques Chirac, offre au public un ensemble documentaire précieux sur un pays aux traditions d'une grande richesse et peu visité durant cette période de l'entre-deux-guerres."--Page 4 of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 209 pages ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
xvii, 197 pages ; 24 cm
  • Acknowledgements Dedication Table of Contents Introduction 1 Introduction 1.1.Turkish Public Reaction 1.2.Methodology 1.3.Literature Review 1.4.Turkish Press 1.5.Two Critical Clarifications 1.5.1.Palestine 1.5.2.Zionism 2 The Road Toward the Establishment of the State of Israel 2.1.Pre-First World War Palestine 2.1.1.Demography of Palestine 2.1.2.Historical Homeland vs. Nature of Population: Two People, Two Claims 2.1.3.The Yishuv 2.1.4.First Aliyah and the Jewish Settlement 2.1.5.The Establishment of Agricultural Settlements 2.1.6.Ottoman Reaction to the Jewish Immigration to Palestine 2.1.7.Struggle to Survive 2.1.8.The Arab People of Palestine 2.1.9.Second Aliyah and the First Jewish Defense Organizations 2.1.10.Theodor Herzl and The Zionist Congress 2.1.11.The Rise of Pan-Arabism 2.2.The First World War and the Dissolution of the Ottoman Empire 2.2.1.The Outbreak of the First World War 2.2.2.The Role of the Palestinian Jews in the First World War 2.2.3.The Balfour Declaration vs. Hussein-McMahon Correspondence 2.2.4.Conflict Between the Arab and Jewish Population of Palestine 2.2.5.The Third and Fourth Wave of Aliyah and 1920 Riots 2.2.6.The Establishment of Haganah and the division among Zionists 2.2.7.The Fifth Wave of Aliyah and 1929 Riots 2.2.8.The Arab Revolt of 1936, the Introduction of the White Paper in 1939 2.3.The Mandate of Palestine During the Second World War 2.4.HaShoah (Holocaust) 2.5.The UN Partition Plan and the Creation of the State of Israel 2.6.Palestine Issue in the Turkish Press During 1930s and 1940s 3 The Jews of Turkey 3.1.The Jewish Population of the Ottoman Empire 3.1.1.The Millet System of the Ottomans 3.1.2.A Revolutionary Change in Education-- The Alliance Israelite Schools 3.1.3.Nationalist Movements in the Ottoman Empire 3.1.4.The Treaty of Lausanne 3.2.Turkish Republic, a New Beginning Full of Hope 3.2.1.The First Decade of the Republic 3.2.2.The Ideal of Turkism 3.2.3.From Nationalism to Racism 3.2.4.Creating a Turkish-Muslim Middle Class 3.2.5.Restoring the Effendi Class 3.2.6.Turkish Language as a Unifying Element 3.2.6.1.The Language of the Minorities 3.2.6.2.Unification of the Education 3.2.6.3.`Citizen, Speak Turkish!' Campaign 3.2.7.Steps for Dismantling the Community Structure 3.2.8.Two Positive Steps on Turkification Process-- the Law on Headgear and Dress (Hat Revolution), and the Law of Surname 3.2.9.A Milestone in the History of the Jews of Turkey-- The Murder of Elza Niyego 4 Changing Balance in International System Affects Turkey 4.1.Rise of Fascism, Nazi Ideology 4.1.1.Turkey during 1930s, under the Shadow of Nazism 4.1.2.Press Freedom in Turkey During the First Four Decades of the Republic 4.1.3.German Academics, 1933 4.2.The Settlement Law of 2510 and the Exodus of the Jews of Thrace 4.3.Turkey's Foreign Policy during the Second World War 4.4.Jewish Immigration to Palestine 4.5.Discriminatory Policies Concerning the Minorities During the Second World War 4.5.1.The Conscription of the Twenty Classes (Yirmi Kur'a Ihritiyat) 1941-1942 4.5.2.The Capital Tax 1942-1944 4.5.3.Republican Party and Minority Report 4.6.Survival Tactics: Kayadez 5 Turkish - Israeli Relations and Turkish Aliyah of 1948 5.1. Zionism in Turkey 5.1.The Idealist Pioneers 5.2.The UN Partition Plan, 1947 5.3.Urfa Massacre, 1947 5.4.The Creation of the State of Israel and Turkey's Position 5.5.Aliyah Boosted with the Establishment of the State of Israel in 1948 5.6.Reactions to the Immigration 5.7.Turkish Jews in Israel 5.8.The Recognition of Israel - 28 March 1949 5.9.An Historical Date: The Opening of the Israeli Consulate in Istanbul 5.10. Turkish Foreign Policy During the Cold War 5.11. Turkish Aliyah Expanded 5.12. Cultural and Economic Relations 5.13. Life in Turkey for the Ones Who Stayed 6 Conclusion Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780761870081 20180416
The nationalist outlook of the Turkish state since the beginning of the Republican era in 1923 targeted uniform identity formation. While Turkey did not recognize the existence of ethnic identities as long as they were Muslim, non-Muslims were challenging this ideal. During this social engineering, the religious minorities and the state had very turbulent relations based on mistrust, resulting in many discriminative legislations. The Republican story of the Jews provides significant insight to highlight the difficulties and challenges encountered in the formation of the Turkish Republic as well as the changes in the Turkish public with the new nation state in effect. Following the Second World War, a new state was established in the Middle East. During the Cold War, the Soviet threat led Turkey to recognize the State of Israel, established as a Jewish state. The main reasoning of Turkey in recognizing Israel was to be accepted to the Western camp. While the bilateral relations of Turkey and Israel increased gradually, a surprisingly high number of Turkish Jews, nearly 40 percent of the Jewish community in Turkey, immigrated to the new country. This book is an attempt to investigate the establishment of the State of Israel, Turkey's recognition of the Jewish state and its repercussions on the Turkish public between the years 1936 and 1956. It explains the establishment of the State of Israel and the first three decades of the Turkish Republic. It includes the religious minorities of Turkey, with a special focus on the Jewish community as it is one of the major links between Turkey and Israel. It combines Turkish public reaction to the establishment and recognition of the State of Israel, shedding light on the reasons of the mass Jewish immigration, which is at the same time the second biggest immigration out of Turkey after the labor immigration to Europe starting from the 1960s.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780761870081 20180416
Green Library
Book
x, 278 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
During World War II, Croatia became a fascist state under the control of the Ustasha Movement - allied with Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. Here, Goran Miljan examines and analyzes for the first time the ideology, practices, and international connections of the Ustasha Youth organization. The Ustasha Youth was an all-embracing fascist youth organization, established in July 1941 by the `Independent State of Croatia' with the goal of reeducating young people in the model of an ideal `new' Croat. This youth organization attempted to set in motion an all-embracing, totalitarian national revolution which in reality consisted of specific interconnected, mutually dependent practices: prosecution, oppression, mass murder, and the Holocaust - all of which were officially legalized within a month of the regime's accession to power. To this end education, sport, manual work and camping took place in specially established Ustasha Youth Schools. In order to justify their radical policies of youth reeducation, the Ustasha Youth, besides emphasizing national character and the importance of cultural and national purity, also engaged in transnational activities and exchanges, especially with the Hlinkova mladez [Hlinka Youth] of the Slovak Republic. Both youth organizations were closely modelled after the youth organizations in Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. This is a little studied part of the history of World War II and of Fascism, and will be essential reading for scholars of Central Europe and the Holocaust.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781788312097 20180709
Green Library
Book
xxv, 264 pages ; 22 cm.
  • 1. Introduction: Basics and Beginnings2. Cosmopolitan Knowledge: Impressions from Everyday Life in Athens3. Exclusive Diversity and the Ambiguity of Being Out of Place4. Resolutionary Recollections: Event, Memory, and Sharing the Suffering5. Capital of Memory: Cosmopolitanist Nostalgia in Istanbul6. Epilogue: An Attempt to Update: Prospects for the Community, the City, and Cosmopolitanism.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137554857 20180122
As the former capital of two great empires-Eastern Roman and Ottoman-Istanbul has been home to many diverse populations, a condition often glossed as cosmopolitanism. The Greek-speaking Christian Orthodox community (Rum Polites) is among the oldest in the urban society, yet their leading status during the centuries of imperial cosmopolitanism has faded. They have even been brought to the brink of disappearance in their home city. Scattered around the world as a result of the homogenizing tendencies of nationalism, the Rum Polites in the diaspora of Istanbul ("the City" or Poli) continue to identify with its cosmopolitan legacy, as vividly shown through their everyday practices of distinction and cultural memory. By exploring the shifting meaning of cosmopolitanism in spatial and temporal contexts, Diaspora of the City examines how experiences of forced displacement can highlight changing conceptualizations of what constitutes a local, diasporic, minority, or migrant community in different multicultural urban settings, past and present.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137554857 20180122
Green Library
Book
1 online resource.
  • 1. Introduction: Basics and Beginnings2. Cosmopolitan Knowledge: Impressions from Everyday Life in Athens3. Exclusive Diversity and the Ambiguity of Being Out of Place4. Resolutionary Recollections: Event, Memory, and Sharing the Suffering5. Capital of Memory: Cosmopolitanist Nostalgia in Istanbul6. Epilogue: An Attempt to Update: Prospects for the Community, the City, and Cosmopolitanism.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137554857 20180514
As the former capital of two great empires-Eastern Roman and Ottoman-Istanbul has been home to many diverse populations, a condition often glossed as cosmopolitanism. The Greek-speaking Christian Orthodox community (Rum Polites) is among the oldest in the urban society, yet their leading status during the centuries of imperial cosmopolitanism has faded. They have even been brought to the brink of disappearance in their home city. Scattered around the world as a result of the homogenizing tendencies of nationalism, the Rum Polites in the diaspora of Istanbul ("the City" or Poli) continue to identify with its cosmopolitan legacy, as vividly shown through their everyday practices of distinction and cultural memory. By exploring the shifting meaning of cosmopolitanism in spatial and temporal contexts, Diaspora of the City examines how experiences of forced displacement can highlight changing conceptualizations of what constitutes a local, diasporic, minority, or migrant community in different multicultural urban settings, past and present.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137554857 20180514
EBSCOhost Access limited to 1 user
Book
xv, 191 pages : illustrations, maps ; 21 cm.
  • Introduction.- Imagining, Planning and Building Mostar after the War.- The Everyday Life of Mostar.- Grassroots Movements and the Production of (other) Space(s).- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811077777 20180521
Focusing on Mostar, a city in Bosnia Herzegovina that became the epitome of ethnic divisions during the Yugoslav wars, this cutting edge book considers processes of violent partitioning in cities. Providing an in-depth understanding of the social, political, and mundane dynamics that keep cities polarized, it examines the potential that moments of inter-ethnic collaboration hold in re-imaging these cities as other than divided. Against the backdrop of normalised practices of ethnic partitioning, the book studies both `planned' and `unplanned' moments of disruption; it looks at how networks of solidarity come into existence regardless of identity politics as well as the role of organised grassroots groups that attempt to create more inclusive; and it critically engages with urban spaces of resistance. Challenging the representation of the city as merely a site of ethnic divisions, the author also explores the complexities arising from living in a city that validates its citizens solely through ethnicity. Elaborating on the relationships between space, culture and social change, this book is a key read for scholars, students, and urban practitioners studying ethnically divided cities worldwide.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811077777 20180521
Green Library
Book
352 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
359 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 172 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Preface 1. The Shift in the Ottoman Patronage System between the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries 2. The Emergence and Rise of Nurbanu in Ottoman Dynastic Politics 3. The Written Records of the Atik Valide 4. The Functional and Iconographic Significance of Nurbanu's Monument Conclusion Appendices Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138099791 20180702
Nurbanu (1525-1583) is one of the most prominent yet least studied royal women of the Ottoman dynasty. Her political and administrative career began when she was chosen as the favorite concubine of the crown prince Selim. Nurbanu's authority increased when her son Murad was singled out as crown prince. By 1574, when her son, Murad III became Sultan, Nurbanu officially took on the title of Valide Sultan, or Queen Mother, holding the highest office of the imperial harem until her death in 1583. This book concentrates on the Atik Valide mosque complex, which constitutes the architectural embodiment of Nurbanu's prestige, power and piety. The arrangement of the chapters is designed to enable readers to reconsider Ottoman imperial patronage practices of the late sixteenth century using the architectural enterprise of a remarkable woman as the common thread. Chapter 1 provides a general history of the wqaf institution to inform on its origins and evolution. Chapter 2 looks closely at the political dealings of Nurbanu, both in the domestic and the international sphere, building upon research concerning Ottoman royal women and power dynamics of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Chapter 3 presents a textual analysis of the written records pertaining to Nurbanu's imperial mosque complex. Chapter 4 examines the distinctive physical qualities and functional features of the Atik Valide within its urban context. The book concludes by assessing to what extent Nurbanu was involved in the representation of her power and piety through the undertaking of her eponymous monument. Providing a complete study of the life and times of this Ottoman empress, this book will appeal to students and scholars of Ottoman studies, gender studies, history of art and architecture, Islamic studies, history of religion and Middle Eastern studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138099791 20180702
Green Library
Book
239 pages, 12 unnumbered pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)