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Book
xvi, 236 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
435 pages, 12 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
455 pages ; 19 cm.
Green Library
Book
159 pages ; 21 cm
Green Library

5. Amalfi [2018]

Book
167 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
134 pages ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
xix, 322 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • List of Figures Acknowledgements Foreword (Helena Fracchia) Note on Abbreviations and Translations Introduction 1 Lucania and Lucanians Lucanian Borders and Geographical Setting The Emergence of the Lucanian Ethnos 1.3 Social Structure: Oligarchies and "Intermediate Groups" 1.4 Political Organization: Touta and Basileis 1.5 Settlement System: a Landscape of Fortified Centres, Farms, and Extramural Sanctuaries 1.6 The Lucanian Settlement Model: an "Urban" Phenomenon? 2 Lucanian Cult Places: Topographic and Architectural Aspects 2.1 The Sanctuary: a Distinctive Sign of the Lucanian Ethnos 2.2 The Sanctuaries within the Settlement Organization of Ancient Lucania 2.3 Architecture and Space Organization 2.4 Architectural Models and Cultural Influences 3. Lucanian Cult Places: Cultic Manifestations 3.1 Votive Offerings and Ritual Practices: Archaeological Phenomenology and Historical Interpretation 3.1.1 Votive offerings: "gifts" to the gods 3.1.2 Ritual tools: communal meals, sacrifice, and fumigations 3.2 The System of Votive Offerings: Reiterated Dedications and una tantum Rituals 3.3 Lucanian Cult Places and the Emergence of the "Intermediate Groups"ã 4 Lucanian Cults and Pantheon Between Epigraphy and Archaeology 4.1 Water and Fertility Cults 4.2 Male Cults 4.3 Mefitis in the Sanctuary of Rossano di Vaglio: the Epigraphic Evidence 4.3.1 The etymology of Mefitis 4.3.2 Mefitis's epithets 4.3.3 Mefitis and other deities 4.4 The Cult of Mefitis at Rossano di Vaglio: a Cross Reading of Written and Archaeological Sources 5 Lucania and the Rise of Roman Power 5.1 From Leukania to Regio III 5.2 Territorial and Administrative Change 5.2.1 The new political and institutional organization 5.2.2 Ruralization and the disappearance of hilltop centres 5.3 Social Transformations and the Vanishing of the "Intermediate Groups" 5.4 Contraction and Continuity in Lucania during the Late Republican Age 6. Lucanian Cult Places during the Late Republican Age 6.1 The Late Republican Age: Change and Continuity in Lucanian Cult Places 6.2 The Political and Social Context 6.3 The Late Republican Phases of the Sanctuary of Rossano di Vaglio 6.3.1 Restoration phases: a reconstruction 6.3.2 Votive material 6.3.4 Rossano di Vaglio in the wider context of "Italic Hellenism" 6.3.5 The management of the sanctuary during the last two centuries BC 6.4 The Role of Lucanian Sanctuaries in the Post-Hannibalic Age 7. Conclusions Catalogue of Lucanian Cult Places Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472423917 20171009
With the emergence and structuring of the Lucanian ethnos during the fourth century BC, a network of cult places, set apart from habitation spaces, was created at the crossroads of the most important communication routes of ancient Lucania. These sanctuaries became centers of social and political aggregation of the local communities: a space in which the community united for all the social manifestations that, in urban societies, were usually performed within the city space. With a detailed analysis of the archaeological record, this study traces the historical and archaeological narrative of Lucanian cult places from their creation to the Late Republican Age, which saw the incorporation of southern Italy into the Roman state. By placing the sanctuaries within their territorial, political, social, and cultural context, Battiloro offers insight into the diachronic development of sacred architecture and ritual customs in ancient Lucania. The author highlights the role of material evidence in constructing the significance of sanctuaries in the historical context in which they were used, and crucial new evidence from the most recent archaeological investigations is explored in order to define dynamics of contact and interaction between Lucanians and Romans on the eve of the Roman conquest.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472423917 20171009
Green Library
Book
270 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiii, 471 pages : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction. "Distant models"? Italian fascism, National socialism and the lure of the classics / Helen Roche
  • Part I: People. The Aryans: ideology and historiographical narrative types in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries / Felix Wiedemann
  • Desired bodies: Leni Riefenstahl's Olympia, Aryan masculinity and the classical body / Daniel Wildmann
  • Ancient historians and fascism: how to react intellectually to totalitarianism (or not) / Dino Piovan
  • Philology in exile: Adorno, Auerbach, and Klemperer / James I. Porter
  • Part II: Ideas. Fascist modernity, religion, and the myth of Rome / Jan Nelis
  • Bathing in the spirit of eternal Rome: the Mostra Augustea della Romanità / Joshua Arthurs
  • "May a ray from Hellas shine upon us": Plato in the George-circle / Stefan Rebenich
  • An antique echo: Plato and the Nazis / Alan Kim
  • Classics and education in the Third Reich: die alten Sprachen and the nazification of Latin- and Greek-teaching in secondary schools / Helen Roche
  • Classical antiquity, cinema and propaganda / Arthur J. Pomeroy
  • Part III: Places. Classical archaeology in Nazi Germany / Stefan Altekamp
  • Building the image of power: images of Romanità in the civic architecture of fascist Italy / Flavia Marcello
  • Forma urbis Mussolinii: vision and rhetoric in the designs for fascist Rome / Flavia Marcello
  • National socialism, classicism, and architecture / Iain Boyd Whyte
  • Neoclassical form and the construction of power in fascist Italy and Nazi Germany / James J. Fortuna.
The first ever guide to the manifold uses and reinterpretations of the classical tradition in Mussolini's Italy and Hitler's Germany, Brill's Companion to the Classics, Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany explores how political propaganda manipulated and reinvented the legacy of ancient Greece and Rome in order to create consensus and historical legitimation for the Fascist and National Socialist dictatorships. The memory of the past is a powerful tool to justify policy and create consensus, and, under the Fascist and Nazi regimes, the legacy of classical antiquity was often evoked to promote thorough transformations of Italian and German culture, society, and even landscape. At the same time, the classical past was constantly recreated to fit the ideology of each regime.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004246041 20180115
Green Library
Book
xii, 361 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • List of Illustrations List of Maps List of Tables List of Contributors Introduction: Florence, Capital of the Kingdom of Italy, Monika Poettinger (Bocconi University, Italy) Part I: Culture and Politics 1. A New Capital for Italy: Politics and Culture, Cosimo Ceccuti (University of Florence, Italy) 2. A Capital of Culture, Sergio Caruso (University of Florence, Italy) 3. Bettino Ricasoli: Economic Policy or House Management?, Piero Roggi (University of Florence, Italy) 4. Bettino Ricasoli and the Sunset of Moderate Hegemony, Daniele Bronzuoli (University of Siena, Italy) 5. Activist Literary Culture in Florence (1865-1871), Gino Tellini (University of Florence, Italy) 6. Science and Florence's Ruling Class - Fabio Bertini (University of Florence, Italy) 7. The Technical Institute of Florence at the Paris Universal Exhibition of 1867, Paolo Brenni, Laura Faustini, Elena Mechi (Science and Technology Foundation, Italy) Part II: A Stroll Around Florence Capital of Italy 8. Popular Life in the Streets of Florence, Zeffiro Ciuffoletti and Maria Grazia Proli (University of Florence, Italy) 9. A Stroll around Florence: Places of Power, Places of Pleasure, Maria Carla Monaco (Independent Scholar, Italy) Part III: Economy and Society 10. An Economy Stuck at the Crossroads to Modernity, Andrea Giuntini (University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy) 11. Florentine, Italian and Foreign Entrepreneurs in the Urban Renovation of Florence, Daniela Manetti (University of Pisa, Italy) 12. Enterprises and Entrepreneurs in Tuscany, Monika Poettinger (Bocconi University, Italy) 13. Food Availability and Consumption Patterns in Florence and Tuscany after Italy's Unification, Francesco Ammannati (Bocconi University, Italy) 14. Banks and Capitalists in Florence in the Decades after Unification, Marco Cini (University of Pisa, Italy) and Simone Fagioli (Italian Association of Archivists, Italy) 15. Straw Hats: The Invisible Work of Women behind the International Image of Florence, Monica Pacini (University of Florence, Italy) Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781350013988 20180219
This edited collection provides the first comprehensive history of Florence as the mid-19th century capital of the fledgling Italian nation. Covering various aspects of politics, economics, culture and society, this book examines the impact that the short-lived experience of becoming the political and administrative centre of the Kingdom of Italy had on the Tuscan city, both immediately and in the years that followed. It reflects upon the urbanising changes that affected the appearance of the city and the introduction of various economic and cultural innovations. The volume also analyses the crisis caused by the eventual relocation of the capital to Rome and the subsequent bankruptcy of the communality which hampered Florence on the long road to modernity. Florence: Capital of the Kingdom of Italy, 1865-71 is a fascinating study for all students and scholars of modern Italian history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781350013988 20180219
Green Library
Book
517 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
vi, 565 pages, 26 pages of plates : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 34 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
205 pages : 1 illustration ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
294 pages ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
607 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
207 pages ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
x, 342 pages : illustrations (chieflly color) ; 25 cm.
  • Acknowledgements List of Illustrations Introduction 1 The "Nation" in Rome: O Cianain's "Pilgrimage of the Earls" (1609) 2 The Exile as Historian: Luke Wadding's Annales Minorum (1625-54) between Global and Local Affiliations 3 The Transculturation of Exile: Visual Style and Identity in the Frescoes of the Aula Maxima at St. Isidore's (1672) 4 A Poetic Anthology for Exiles: Irish Cultural Memory in the First Printed Gaelic Grammar (1677) 5 The Return of the Exile: Oliver Plunkett between Rome and Ireland 6 Irish Protestants in the Theater of the World: The Apostolic Hospice for the Converting, Rome, 1677-1745 7 The Romance and Disillusionment of Exile: Charles Wogan and his Memoir of Clementina Sobieska 8 "The Spiritual Government of the Entire World": A Memorial for the Irish College Rome, January 1783 Conclusion Bibliography Appendix 1:â Comparison of GLH with manuscript Grammars Appendix 2:â Index of first lines in Grammatica Latino-Hibernica Appendix 3: List of Irish Guests at the Ospizio Apostolico dei Convertendi Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004335165 20180409
In Exiles in a Global City, Clare Carroll explores Irish migrants' experiences in early modern Rome (1609-1783) and interprets representations of their cultural identities in relation to their interaction with world-wide Spanish and Roman institutions. This study focuses on some sources in Roman archives not previously considered by Irish historians. The book examines a wide array of cultural productions-O Cianain's account of O'Neill's progress from Ireland to Rome, Luke Wadding's history of the Franciscan order, the portraits at S. Isidoro, the first printed Irish grammar, the letters of Oliver Plunkett, the records of a hospice for converts, Charles Wogan's memoir, and reports on the national college-for how they transformed emerging senses of an Irish nation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004335165 20180409
Green Library

18. Florence & Tuscany [2018]

Book
351 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 20 cm + 1 pull-out map
Green Library
Book
xv, 176 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
xviii, 479 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm.
  • List of Illustrations Abbreviations and Spelling Acknowledgements Introduction The Traditional View A New View Periodization, Methodology, and Structure Social Networks Archival Research in Florence and Rome Insights into a Rich Cultural and Intellectual World 1. Florentine Patricians and Their Changing Social and Political Position (1530-1670) Introduction 1.1 The Forming of the Duchy of the Medici in Florence 29 1531-1537 - The Reign of the First Duke Alessandro de' Medici and Changing Political Institutions 1.2 The Nomination of Duke Cosimo I, the Patricians' Loss of Political Power, the Arrival of Non-Florentine Courtiers and The Patricians' Quest to Regain Political Influence (1537-1609) Cosimo's Quest for Political Independence The Patricians' Counterquest for Political Recognition 1.3 The Patricians' Run on Noble Titles, Their Social Domination over the `Uomini Nuovi' and Their Growing Political Power (1609-1670) 1.4 Social and Economic Power of Seventeenth-Century Patricians 1.5 The Patricians' Contribution to the Economic Stability of Tuscany in the Seventeenth Century 1.6 Cittadini or Noble Courtiers? 1.7 Patrician Careers in Tuscany, Rome and Malta Conclusion 2. Florentine Patricians in Their Role as Ambassadors and Chamberlains and Their Influence on the Social and Cultural Representation of the Medici in Florence, Rome and at Other Courts Introduction 2.1 Patricians as Diplomats 2.2 Patricians as Ambassadors 2.2.1 Giovanni Niccolini (Tuscan Ambassador in Rome from 1587 until 1610) Food Gifts Other Gifts of Grand Duke Ferdinand I Visitors in the Garden of Villa Medici The Issue of Precedence: the Entry of the New Ambassador Piero Guicciardini in Rome The Preliminary Concerns The Medici and the Savoy: the Conflict of Precedence A Precedence Issue of 1608: Don Antonio de' Medici Visits Mantua The Actual Arrival of Piero Guicciardini as the New Ambassador 2.2.2 Piero Guicciardini (Tuscan Ambassador in Rome from 1611 until 1621) Socializing with Cardinals and Other Prominent Persons in Rome The Acquisition of Paintings for the Medici Court The Elsheimer-tabernacle Cardinal Carlo de' Medici Travels to Rome (1616) 2.2.3 Other Patrician Ambassadors and Their Direct Influence on the Course of Events at the Court of Madrid and Rome Francesco Guicciardini and His Advice for Cultural Gifts at the Court of Madri Francesco Niccolini (Tuscan Ambassador in Rome from 1621 until 1643) and the Palazzo Madama on the Campo Marzio in Rome 2.3 A Florentine Patrician as Chamberlain of a Medici Prince and His Influence on the Social Representation of the Medici in Rome: Filippo Niccolini and His Decisions Regarding the Entry of Cardinal Giovan Carlo de' Medici into Rome (1645) The Decoration of the Carriage: Polished or Gilded Ironwork? The Uniforms and the Ceremonial Mace: Recycling, but Not Too Obvious The Decoration of Palazzo Madama 77 The Public Entry of Cardinal Giovan Carlo de' Medici into Rome (1645) Conclusion 3. Patricians as Patrons and Collectors During the Reigns of Ferdinand I, Cosimo II, the Regents and Ferdinand II de' Medici Introduction 3.1 Patricians as Patrons and Collectors During the Reigns of Ferdinand I and Cosimo II de' Medici 3.1.1 Giovanni Niccolini (1544-1611) The Niccolini Chapel in Santa Croce The Niccolini Palace and Giovanni's Collection of Paintings, Sculptures and Coins 3.1.2 Piero Guicciardini (1569-1626) The Guicciardini Chapel in Santa Felicita The Guicciardini Palace and the Collection of Art 3.1.3 Michelangelo Buonarroti the Younger (1568-1647) The First Three Rooms of the Galleria Buonarroti Some Contemporary Decoration Cycles of the Medici and Influences of the Galleria Buonarroti on the Decoration of Casino Mediceo The Fourth Room of the Galleria Buonarroti, Buonarroti's Attempt to Build Up an Antique Sculpture Collection, and Pietro Da Cortona's Stay in Florence Buonarroti's Influences on the Patronage of Grand Duke Ferdinand II 3.1.4 Niccolo dell'Antella (1560-1630) 3.2 Patricians as Patrons and Collectors During the Reigns of the Regents and Ferdinand II de' Medici 3.2.1 Giovan Battista Strozzi the Younger (1596-1636) His Art Collection and the Interest of the Medici and Patricians for Paintings with Literary Themes 3.2.2 Tommaso Guadagni (1582-1652) The Guadagni Palace 3.2.3 Giovanni (1600-1661) and Lorenzo (1602-1656) di Jacopo Corsi The Corsi Villa The Corsi Palace and the Difference Between the Decoration of the Palace and the Villa 3.2.4 Filippo Niccolini (1586-1666) The Montauto Castle Villa Camugliano and the Niccolini Palace Conclusion 4. The Shared Cultural World of the Medici Princes and the Florentine Patricians: Musical Performances, European Networks, and Cultural Academies Introduction Part I 4.1 Giovanni de' Medici and the Alterat 4.2 Giovan Carlo de' Medici and Filippo Niccolini 4.2.1 Niccolini as Supervisor of Giovan Carlo's Cultural Projects 4.2.2 Niccolini's Correspondence with Musicians: New Baroque Influences from Rome The Unknown Copyist Vannucci Sends Ariettas by Caproli and Carissimi to Florence Marco Marazzoli and His Recitatives for Antonio Rivani A Private Music Academy at the Palazzo and Villa of Marchese Niccolini? 4.2.3 Niccolini's Contacts to Clients of Queen Christina of Sweden 4.3 Leopoldo de' Medici (1617-1675) and His Cultural Contact with Florentine Patricians The Acquisition of Books and Works of Art on Paper Leopoldo's Interest in the Theatre Life at Different Italian Courts Relations with European Men of letters Part II 4.4 Patricians, Artists, and Their Literary, Linguistic, and Theatrical Experiments at Florentine Cultural Academies and Confraternities 4.4.1 Literary and Linguistic Academies The Apatisti The Svogliati, the Crusca and Burlesque Poems Influenced by the Literary Academies The Pastori Antellesi 4.4.2 Theatrical Academies The Incostanti, the Improvvisi/Percossi, the Affinati, and the Sorgenti Theatrical Performances at the Youth Confraternity Arcangelo Raffaello Conclusion 5. The Brokerage Activities of Michelangelo Buonarroti The Younger and the Exchange of Cultural Gifts 155 Introduction Part I 5.1 Social Networks 5.2 Patronage Networks Patrons, Clients, and Friends Dyadic, Non-Corporate Groups 5.3 Brokerage Networks Brokerage Networks in Theory How Did a Broker Make Profit? Dyadic Chains 5.4 Maintaining Patronage Relationships: Exchanging Courtesies and Gifts Part II 5.5 The Social Network of Michelangelo Buonarroti the Younger 5.6 The Exchange of Gifts and Genealogical Information Between Buonarroti and Florentine Patricians at Different Italian and European Courts Books, Manuscripts, and Genealogical Information Poems and Songs Food Gifts Buonarroti's Own Works as Gifts 5.7 The Brokerage Activities of Michelangelo Buonarroti the Younger 5.7.1 Social and Geographic Mobility of Artists 5.7.2 Cultural Brokerage Services and Arranging Gifts Arranging a Diplomatic Gift for the Cardinal Infante Ferdinand of Austria 5.7.3 Improving Patron-Client Contacts and Bringing Commissions to Completion The Commission of `Judith' (Cristofano Allori) for Cardinal Alessandro Orsini The Commission of `Latona and Her Children' (Domenico Pieratti) for Cardinal Francesco Barberini 5.7.4 Job Requests Conclusion 6. The Patricians' Contribution to Cultural Events the Medici Organised for Public Ceremonies and in Honour of Visiting Guests Introduction 6.1 Theatre Plays in Honour of Visiting Guests 6.1.1 Theatre Plays in Honour of Fakhr ad-Din 6.1.2 Theatre Plays in Honour of Other Important Guests 6.2 The Patricians' Contribution to the Organisation of Memorial Ceremonies The Memorial Ceremonies of 1598, 1610, and 1612 6.3 The Patricians' Contribution to the Organization of Marriages The Marriages of 1600 and 1608 Descriptions of Marriages and Memorial Ceremonies The Marriages of 1637 and 1661 Conclusion Conclusion Appendices Appendix I: Archival Sources Referring to Chapter 2 Appendix II: Archival Sources Referring to Chapter 4 Appendix III: Archival Sources Referring to Chapter 5 Appendix IV: Archival Sources Referring to Chapter 6 Glossary Bibliography Index of Historical Persons.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004346529 20171211
In Florentine Patricians and Their Networks, Elisa Goudriaan presents the first comprehensive overview of the cultural world and diplomatic strategies of the Florentine patricians in the seventeenth century and of the ways in which they contributed as a group to the court culture of the Medici. The author focusses on the patricians' musical, theatrical, literary, and artistic pursuits, and uses these to show how politics, social life, and cultural activities tended to merge in early modern society. Quotations from many archival sources, mainly correspondence, make this book a lively reading-experience and offer a new perspective on seventeenth-century Florentine society, by revealing the mechanisms behind elite patronage networks, cultural input, recruiting processes, and brokerage activities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004346529 20171211
Green Library