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Book
xix, 322 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • List of Figures Acknowledgements Foreword (Helena Fracchia) Note on Abbreviations and Translations Introduction 1 Lucania and Lucanians Lucanian Borders and Geographical Setting The Emergence of the Lucanian Ethnos 1.3 Social Structure: Oligarchies and "Intermediate Groups" 1.4 Political Organization: Touta and Basileis 1.5 Settlement System: a Landscape of Fortified Centres, Farms, and Extramural Sanctuaries 1.6 The Lucanian Settlement Model: an "Urban" Phenomenon? 2 Lucanian Cult Places: Topographic and Architectural Aspects 2.1 The Sanctuary: a Distinctive Sign of the Lucanian Ethnos 2.2 The Sanctuaries within the Settlement Organization of Ancient Lucania 2.3 Architecture and Space Organization 2.4 Architectural Models and Cultural Influences 3. Lucanian Cult Places: Cultic Manifestations 3.1 Votive Offerings and Ritual Practices: Archaeological Phenomenology and Historical Interpretation 3.1.1 Votive offerings: "gifts" to the gods 3.1.2 Ritual tools: communal meals, sacrifice, and fumigations 3.2 The System of Votive Offerings: Reiterated Dedications and una tantum Rituals 3.3 Lucanian Cult Places and the Emergence of the "Intermediate Groups"ã 4 Lucanian Cults and Pantheon Between Epigraphy and Archaeology 4.1 Water and Fertility Cults 4.2 Male Cults 4.3 Mefitis in the Sanctuary of Rossano di Vaglio: the Epigraphic Evidence 4.3.1 The etymology of Mefitis 4.3.2 Mefitis's epithets 4.3.3 Mefitis and other deities 4.4 The Cult of Mefitis at Rossano di Vaglio: a Cross Reading of Written and Archaeological Sources 5 Lucania and the Rise of Roman Power 5.1 From Leukania to Regio III 5.2 Territorial and Administrative Change 5.2.1 The new political and institutional organization 5.2.2 Ruralization and the disappearance of hilltop centres 5.3 Social Transformations and the Vanishing of the "Intermediate Groups" 5.4 Contraction and Continuity in Lucania during the Late Republican Age 6. Lucanian Cult Places during the Late Republican Age 6.1 The Late Republican Age: Change and Continuity in Lucanian Cult Places 6.2 The Political and Social Context 6.3 The Late Republican Phases of the Sanctuary of Rossano di Vaglio 6.3.1 Restoration phases: a reconstruction 6.3.2 Votive material 6.3.4 Rossano di Vaglio in the wider context of "Italic Hellenism" 6.3.5 The management of the sanctuary during the last two centuries BC 6.4 The Role of Lucanian Sanctuaries in the Post-Hannibalic Age 7. Conclusions Catalogue of Lucanian Cult Places Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472423917 20171009
With the emergence and structuring of the Lucanian ethnos during the fourth century BC, a network of cult places, set apart from habitation spaces, was created at the crossroads of the most important communication routes of ancient Lucania. These sanctuaries became centers of social and political aggregation of the local communities: a space in which the community united for all the social manifestations that, in urban societies, were usually performed within the city space. With a detailed analysis of the archaeological record, this study traces the historical and archaeological narrative of Lucanian cult places from their creation to the Late Republican Age, which saw the incorporation of southern Italy into the Roman state. By placing the sanctuaries within their territorial, political, social, and cultural context, Battiloro offers insight into the diachronic development of sacred architecture and ritual customs in ancient Lucania. The author highlights the role of material evidence in constructing the significance of sanctuaries in the historical context in which they were used, and crucial new evidence from the most recent archaeological investigations is explored in order to define dynamics of contact and interaction between Lucanians and Romans on the eve of the Roman conquest.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472423917 20171009
Green Library
Book
xiii, 471 pages : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction. "Distant models"? Italian fascism, National socialism and the lure of the classics / Helen Roche
  • Part I: People. The Aryans: ideology and historiographical narrative types in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries / Felix Wiedemann
  • Desired bodies: Leni Riefenstahl's Olympia, Aryan masculinity and the classical body / Daniel Wildmann
  • Ancient historians and fascism: how to react intellectually to totalitarianism (or not) / Dino Piovan
  • Philology in exile: Adorno, Auerbach, and Klemperer / James I. Porter
  • Part II: Ideas. Fascist modernity, religion, and the myth of Rome / Jan Nelis
  • Bathing in the spirit of eternal Rome: the Mostra Augustea della Romanità / Joshua Arthurs
  • "May a ray from Hellas shine upon us": Plato in the George-circle / Stefan Rebenich
  • An antique echo: Plato and the Nazis / Alan Kim
  • Classics and education in the Third Reich: die alten Sprachen and the nazification of Latin- and Greek-teaching in secondary schools / Helen Roche
  • Classical antiquity, cinema and propaganda / Arthur J. Pomeroy
  • Part III: Places. Classical archaeology in Nazi Germany / Stefan Altekamp
  • Building the image of power: images of Romanità in the civic architecture of fascist Italy / Flavia Marcello
  • Forma urbis Mussolinii: vision and rhetoric in the designs for fascist Rome / Flavia Marcello
  • National socialism, classicism, and architecture / Iain Boyd Whyte
  • Neoclassical form and the construction of power in fascist Italy and Nazi Germany / James J. Fortuna.
The first ever guide to the manifold uses and reinterpretations of the classical tradition in Mussolini's Italy and Hitler's Germany, Brill's Companion to the Classics, Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany explores how political propaganda manipulated and reinvented the legacy of ancient Greece and Rome in order to create consensus and historical legitimation for the Fascist and National Socialist dictatorships. The memory of the past is a powerful tool to justify policy and create consensus, and, under the Fascist and Nazi regimes, the legacy of classical antiquity was often evoked to promote thorough transformations of Italian and German culture, society, and even landscape. At the same time, the classical past was constantly recreated to fit the ideology of each regime.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004246041 20180115
Green Library
Book
xviii, 479 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm.
  • List of Illustrations Abbreviations and Spelling Acknowledgements Introduction The Traditional View A New View Periodization, Methodology, and Structure Social Networks Archival Research in Florence and Rome Insights into a Rich Cultural and Intellectual World 1. Florentine Patricians and Their Changing Social and Political Position (1530-1670) Introduction 1.1 The Forming of the Duchy of the Medici in Florence 29 1531-1537 - The Reign of the First Duke Alessandro de' Medici and Changing Political Institutions 1.2 The Nomination of Duke Cosimo I, the Patricians' Loss of Political Power, the Arrival of Non-Florentine Courtiers and The Patricians' Quest to Regain Political Influence (1537-1609) Cosimo's Quest for Political Independence The Patricians' Counterquest for Political Recognition 1.3 The Patricians' Run on Noble Titles, Their Social Domination over the `Uomini Nuovi' and Their Growing Political Power (1609-1670) 1.4 Social and Economic Power of Seventeenth-Century Patricians 1.5 The Patricians' Contribution to the Economic Stability of Tuscany in the Seventeenth Century 1.6 Cittadini or Noble Courtiers? 1.7 Patrician Careers in Tuscany, Rome and Malta Conclusion 2. Florentine Patricians in Their Role as Ambassadors and Chamberlains and Their Influence on the Social and Cultural Representation of the Medici in Florence, Rome and at Other Courts Introduction 2.1 Patricians as Diplomats 2.2 Patricians as Ambassadors 2.2.1 Giovanni Niccolini (Tuscan Ambassador in Rome from 1587 until 1610) Food Gifts Other Gifts of Grand Duke Ferdinand I Visitors in the Garden of Villa Medici The Issue of Precedence: the Entry of the New Ambassador Piero Guicciardini in Rome The Preliminary Concerns The Medici and the Savoy: the Conflict of Precedence A Precedence Issue of 1608: Don Antonio de' Medici Visits Mantua The Actual Arrival of Piero Guicciardini as the New Ambassador 2.2.2 Piero Guicciardini (Tuscan Ambassador in Rome from 1611 until 1621) Socializing with Cardinals and Other Prominent Persons in Rome The Acquisition of Paintings for the Medici Court The Elsheimer-tabernacle Cardinal Carlo de' Medici Travels to Rome (1616) 2.2.3 Other Patrician Ambassadors and Their Direct Influence on the Course of Events at the Court of Madrid and Rome Francesco Guicciardini and His Advice for Cultural Gifts at the Court of Madri Francesco Niccolini (Tuscan Ambassador in Rome from 1621 until 1643) and the Palazzo Madama on the Campo Marzio in Rome 2.3 A Florentine Patrician as Chamberlain of a Medici Prince and His Influence on the Social Representation of the Medici in Rome: Filippo Niccolini and His Decisions Regarding the Entry of Cardinal Giovan Carlo de' Medici into Rome (1645) The Decoration of the Carriage: Polished or Gilded Ironwork? The Uniforms and the Ceremonial Mace: Recycling, but Not Too Obvious The Decoration of Palazzo Madama 77 The Public Entry of Cardinal Giovan Carlo de' Medici into Rome (1645) Conclusion 3. Patricians as Patrons and Collectors During the Reigns of Ferdinand I, Cosimo II, the Regents and Ferdinand II de' Medici Introduction 3.1 Patricians as Patrons and Collectors During the Reigns of Ferdinand I and Cosimo II de' Medici 3.1.1 Giovanni Niccolini (1544-1611) The Niccolini Chapel in Santa Croce The Niccolini Palace and Giovanni's Collection of Paintings, Sculptures and Coins 3.1.2 Piero Guicciardini (1569-1626) The Guicciardini Chapel in Santa Felicita The Guicciardini Palace and the Collection of Art 3.1.3 Michelangelo Buonarroti the Younger (1568-1647) The First Three Rooms of the Galleria Buonarroti Some Contemporary Decoration Cycles of the Medici and Influences of the Galleria Buonarroti on the Decoration of Casino Mediceo The Fourth Room of the Galleria Buonarroti, Buonarroti's Attempt to Build Up an Antique Sculpture Collection, and Pietro Da Cortona's Stay in Florence Buonarroti's Influences on the Patronage of Grand Duke Ferdinand II 3.1.4 Niccolo dell'Antella (1560-1630) 3.2 Patricians as Patrons and Collectors During the Reigns of the Regents and Ferdinand II de' Medici 3.2.1 Giovan Battista Strozzi the Younger (1596-1636) His Art Collection and the Interest of the Medici and Patricians for Paintings with Literary Themes 3.2.2 Tommaso Guadagni (1582-1652) The Guadagni Palace 3.2.3 Giovanni (1600-1661) and Lorenzo (1602-1656) di Jacopo Corsi The Corsi Villa The Corsi Palace and the Difference Between the Decoration of the Palace and the Villa 3.2.4 Filippo Niccolini (1586-1666) The Montauto Castle Villa Camugliano and the Niccolini Palace Conclusion 4. The Shared Cultural World of the Medici Princes and the Florentine Patricians: Musical Performances, European Networks, and Cultural Academies Introduction Part I 4.1 Giovanni de' Medici and the Alterat 4.2 Giovan Carlo de' Medici and Filippo Niccolini 4.2.1 Niccolini as Supervisor of Giovan Carlo's Cultural Projects 4.2.2 Niccolini's Correspondence with Musicians: New Baroque Influences from Rome The Unknown Copyist Vannucci Sends Ariettas by Caproli and Carissimi to Florence Marco Marazzoli and His Recitatives for Antonio Rivani A Private Music Academy at the Palazzo and Villa of Marchese Niccolini? 4.2.3 Niccolini's Contacts to Clients of Queen Christina of Sweden 4.3 Leopoldo de' Medici (1617-1675) and His Cultural Contact with Florentine Patricians The Acquisition of Books and Works of Art on Paper Leopoldo's Interest in the Theatre Life at Different Italian Courts Relations with European Men of letters Part II 4.4 Patricians, Artists, and Their Literary, Linguistic, and Theatrical Experiments at Florentine Cultural Academies and Confraternities 4.4.1 Literary and Linguistic Academies The Apatisti The Svogliati, the Crusca and Burlesque Poems Influenced by the Literary Academies The Pastori Antellesi 4.4.2 Theatrical Academies The Incostanti, the Improvvisi/Percossi, the Affinati, and the Sorgenti Theatrical Performances at the Youth Confraternity Arcangelo Raffaello Conclusion 5. The Brokerage Activities of Michelangelo Buonarroti The Younger and the Exchange of Cultural Gifts 155 Introduction Part I 5.1 Social Networks 5.2 Patronage Networks Patrons, Clients, and Friends Dyadic, Non-Corporate Groups 5.3 Brokerage Networks Brokerage Networks in Theory How Did a Broker Make Profit? Dyadic Chains 5.4 Maintaining Patronage Relationships: Exchanging Courtesies and Gifts Part II 5.5 The Social Network of Michelangelo Buonarroti the Younger 5.6 The Exchange of Gifts and Genealogical Information Between Buonarroti and Florentine Patricians at Different Italian and European Courts Books, Manuscripts, and Genealogical Information Poems and Songs Food Gifts Buonarroti's Own Works as Gifts 5.7 The Brokerage Activities of Michelangelo Buonarroti the Younger 5.7.1 Social and Geographic Mobility of Artists 5.7.2 Cultural Brokerage Services and Arranging Gifts Arranging a Diplomatic Gift for the Cardinal Infante Ferdinand of Austria 5.7.3 Improving Patron-Client Contacts and Bringing Commissions to Completion The Commission of `Judith' (Cristofano Allori) for Cardinal Alessandro Orsini The Commission of `Latona and Her Children' (Domenico Pieratti) for Cardinal Francesco Barberini 5.7.4 Job Requests Conclusion 6. The Patricians' Contribution to Cultural Events the Medici Organised for Public Ceremonies and in Honour of Visiting Guests Introduction 6.1 Theatre Plays in Honour of Visiting Guests 6.1.1 Theatre Plays in Honour of Fakhr ad-Din 6.1.2 Theatre Plays in Honour of Other Important Guests 6.2 The Patricians' Contribution to the Organisation of Memorial Ceremonies The Memorial Ceremonies of 1598, 1610, and 1612 6.3 The Patricians' Contribution to the Organization of Marriages The Marriages of 1600 and 1608 Descriptions of Marriages and Memorial Ceremonies The Marriages of 1637 and 1661 Conclusion Conclusion Appendices Appendix I: Archival Sources Referring to Chapter 2 Appendix II: Archival Sources Referring to Chapter 4 Appendix III: Archival Sources Referring to Chapter 5 Appendix IV: Archival Sources Referring to Chapter 6 Glossary Bibliography Index of Historical Persons.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004346529 20171211
In Florentine Patricians and Their Networks, Elisa Goudriaan presents the first comprehensive overview of the cultural world and diplomatic strategies of the Florentine patricians in the seventeenth century and of the ways in which they contributed as a group to the court culture of the Medici. The author focusses on the patricians' musical, theatrical, literary, and artistic pursuits, and uses these to show how politics, social life, and cultural activities tended to merge in early modern society. Quotations from many archival sources, mainly correspondence, make this book a lively reading-experience and offer a new perspective on seventeenth-century Florentine society, by revealing the mechanisms behind elite patronage networks, cultural input, recruiting processes, and brokerage activities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004346529 20171211
Green Library
Book
x, 284 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
xx, 620 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction: Keith Hopkins: sighting shots Christopher Kelly-- 1. Contraception in the Roman Empire-- 2. A textual emendation in a fragment of Musonius Rufus: a note on contraception-- Afterword Caroline Vout-- 3. On the probable age structure of the Roman population-- 4. Graveyards for historians-- Afterword Walter Scheidel-- 5. Economic growths and towns in antiquity-- Afterword Neville Morley-- 6. Taxes and trade in the Roman empire (200 BC-AD 400)-- Afterword Willem M. Jongman-- 7. Models, ships and staples-- Afterword Peter Fibiger Bang and Mamoru Ikeguchi-- 8. From violence to blessing: symbols and rituals in ancient Rome-- Afterword Jas Elsner-- 9. Slavery in classical antiquity-- Afterword Keith Bradley-- 10. Conquest by book-- Afterword William Harris-- 11. Novel evidence for Roman slavery-- Afterword Catharine Edwards-- 12. Christian number and its implications-- Afterword Kate Cooper-- 13. The political economy of the Roman empire-- Afterword Greg Woolf-- 14. How to be a Roman emperor: an autobiography-- Afterword Mary Beard.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107018914 20180122
Keith Hopkins was a sociologist and Professor of Ancient History at Cambridge from 1985 to 2001. He is widely recognised as one of the most radical, innovative and influential Roman historians of his generation. This volume presents fourteen of Hopkins' essays on an impressive range of subjects: contraception, demography, economic history, slavery, literacy, imperial power, Roman religion, Early Christianity, and the social and political structures of the ancient world. The papers have been re-edited and revised with accompanying essays by Hopkins' colleagues, friends and former students. This volume brings Hopkins' work up to date. It sets his distinctive and pioneering use of sociological approaches in a wider intellectual context and explores his lasting impact on the ways that ancient history is now written. This volume will interest all those fascinated by Rome and its empire, and particularly those eager to experience challenging and controversial ways of understanding the past.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107018914 20180122
Green Library
Book
xi, 260 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
307 pages ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
334 pages ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
128 pages ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
448 pages ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
139 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
114 pages : illustrations ; 19 cm.
Green Library
Book
380 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
111 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
178 pages ; illustrations ; 27 cm
Green Library
Book
367 pages ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
293 pages : illustrations, map, genealogical table ; 24 cm
  • Author's Note Map of Europe and the Mediterranean World at the Beginning of Amalasuintha's Regency, Late A.D. 526 Genealogy. The Family of Theodoric Introduction Chapter 1. Mother, Regent, and Queen: Amalasuintha and the Institutions of Power Chapter 2. Amalasuintha at the Palace of Ravenna: The Making of a Queen Chapter 3. A Regent with Imperial Ambitions Chapter 4. Balancing Gothic Tradition with Roman Ideals Chapter 5. Amalasuintha: A Meeting Point Between Kingdoms and Empire Epilogue. Amalasuintha's Legacy in Early Medieval Italy Notes Bibliography Index Acknowledgments.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812249477 20171227
In this book, Massimiliano Vitiello situates the life and career of the Ostrogothic queen Amalasuintha (c. 494/5-535), daughter of Theoderic the Great, in the context of the transitional time, after the fall of Rome, during which new dynastic regimes were experimenting with various forms of political legitimation. A member of the Gothic elite raised in the Romanized palace of Ravenna, Amalasuintha married her father's chosen successor and was set to become a traditional Gothic queen-a helpmate and advisor to her husband, the Visigothic prince Eutharic-with no formal political role of her own. But her early widowhood and the subsequent death of her father threw her into a position unprecedented in the Gothic world: a regent mother who assumed control of the government. During her regency, Amalasuintha clashed with a conservative Gothic aristocracy who resisted her leadership, garnered support among her Roman and pro-Roman subjects, defended Italy from the ambitions of other kings, and negotiated the expansionistic designs of Justinian and Theodora. When her son died unexpectedly at a young age, she undertook her most dangerous political enterprise: forming an unmarried coregency with her cousin, Theodahad, whom she raised to the throne. His final betrayal would cost Amalasuintha her rule and her life. Vitiello argues that Amalasuintha's story reveals a key phase in the transformation of queenship in late antiquity and the early Middle Ages, a time in which royal women slowly began exercising political power. Assessing the ancient sources for Amalasuintha's biography, Cassiodorus, Procopius, Gregory of Tours, and Jordanes, Vitiello demonstrates the ways in which her life and public image show the influence of late Roman and Byzantine imperial models on the formation of female political power in the post-Roman world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812249477 20171227
Green Library
Book
95 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xix, 351 pages : illustrations, map ; 25 cm
  • Preface xi A Note on References and Bibliography xvii Introduction 1 A White Canvas 1 Where, When, and What Was America? 7 European Exchanges 9 Transatlantic Connections 13 America's Place on the Risorgimento's Map 16 Literary Tropes 25 Explaining America 31 Pamphlets, Not Muskets 37 Singing and Dancing America 40 1 America as History 42 Fratricide and Civil War 42 Histories and the Politics of Reception: Carlo Botta 46 History, Literature, and the "Erotics of Art" 56 Botta's Federalism of Nation-States 59 Transatlantic Botta 60 Carlo Giuseppe Londonio and the American Revolution 62 America and Universal History: Giuseppe Compagnoni 66 Historiography as Political Thought 73 2 Concepts in the Language of Politics 78 Political Ideas and National Character 78 Natural Rights and Constitutional Government 80 Luigi Angeloni and Jacobin Americanism 85 Representation in Transnational Perspective: Romagnosi and Balbo 87 Democratic Challenges and the Limits of Italian Anglophilia 93 Federalism 97 Gioberti's Federalism, or "Britain, the Sicily of Europe" 100 Rosmini and the Limits of American Democracy 103 Mazzini's Challenge: Democracy beyond the American Way 108 Democratic Diversions from Mazzini 112 3 A Model Republic? The United States in the Italian Revolutions of 1848 114 An Age of Constitutions: From 1820 to 1848 114 Carlo Cattaneo and the Revolution in Lombardy 121 Cattaneo's Understanding of American Democracy 130 Giuseppe Montanelli and Federal Democracy in Tuscany 138 Independence and Constitutional Models in Sicily 146 From Defeat to Annexation 160 4 Unveiling Modernity: Verdi's America and the Unification of Italy 163 Murder in Boston, Parma, and Paris 163 Un ballo and the Unification of Italy 167 Staging the New World 169 Un ballo, from Rome to the World 172 Reading Un ballo in maschera 175 Verdi's America 177 Turning Gustavo into Riccardo 185 Virgil in America 191 Verdi and "il suo tempo" 193 Lincoln's Un ballo 195 5 A War for Uncle Tom: Slavery and the American Civil War in Italy 199 "Of the Foul Blood of Negroes" 199 Slavery in Italian Political Thought 200 Slavery on Stage 206 Reading Uncle Tom 210 Italian Unification and the American Civil War 215 From Subject Nation to International Arbitrator 221 Conclusions 225 Notes 233 Bibliography 293 Index 333.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691164854 20170731
America in Italy examines the influence of the American political experience on the imagination of Italian political thinkers between the late eighteenth century and the unification of Italy in the 1860s. Axel Korner shows how Italian political thought was shaped by debates about the American Revolution and the U.S. Constitution, but he focuses on the important distinction that while European interest in developments across the Atlantic was keen, this attention was not blind admiration. Rather, America became a sounding board for the critical assessment of societal changes at home. Many Italians did not think the United States had lessons to teach them and often concluded that life across the Atlantic was not just different but in many respects also objectionable. In America, utopia and dystopia seemed to live side by side, and Italian references to the United States were frequently in support of progressive or reactionary causes. Political thinkers including Cesare Balbo, Carlo Cattaneo, Giuseppe Mazzini, and Antonio Rosmini used the United States to shed light on the course of their nation's political resurgence. Concepts from Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Vico served to evaluate what Italians discovered about America. Ideas about American "domestic manners" were reflected and conveyed through works of ballet, literature, opera, and satire. Transcending boundaries between intellectual and cultural history, America in Italy is the first book-length examination of the influence of America's political formation on modern Italian political thought.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691164854 20170731
Green Library
Book
181 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 21 cm.
Green Library