%{search_type} search results

38,921 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
Book
pages cm.
Green Library
Book
xix, 316 pages ; 22 cm
  • 1. INTRODUCTION 2. IN DEFENCE OF `REAL' POLITICS 3. POLITICS AS THEATRE 4. `A TRAGEDY BEYOND WORDS': INTERPRETING BRITISH POLICY TOWARDS NORTHERN IRELAND 5. WERE THE IRA DEFEATED? 6. THEATRICAL POLITICS AND POLITICAL SKILLS 7. THE LABOUR GOVERNMENT, `DIRTY POLITICS' AND THE BELFAST AGREEMENT 8. DEFENDING THE POLITICAL MORALITY OF THE PEACE PROCESS 9. `PEACE WITHIN THE REALMS OF THE POSSIBLE?' DAVID TRIMBLE, UNIONIST IDEOLOGY AND THEATRICAL POLITICS 10. ALL THE WORLD'S A STAGE 11. CONCLUSION: INTERPRETING THE PEACE PROCESS AND THE FUTURE OF NORTHERN IRELAND.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319913421 20180903
This book is exceptional in defending the `dirty politics' of the Northern Ireland peace process. Political actors in Britain, Ireland and the United States performed the peace process and used `political skills', often including deception and hypocrisy, in order to wind down the conflict and achieve accommodation. These political skills, it is argued, are often morally justifiable even as they are popularly condemned. The Northern Ireland peace process has been highly successful in reducing violence and an accurate understanding of its politics is an important contribution to international debates about managing conflict.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319913421 20180903
Green Library
Book
xiii, 231 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Section One: Transnational and Comparative Approaches to 1916 Globalising the Easter Rising: 1916 and the Challenge to Empires Enrico Dal Lago, Roisin Healy and Gearoid Barry (NUI Galway) The Easter Rising and the Changing Character of Irregular Warfare Timothy D. Hoyt (U.S. Naval War College, Newport) Section Two: The Atlantic World Echoes of the Rising in Quebec's Conscription Crisis: The French Canadian Press and the Irish Revolution between 1916 and 1918 Charles-Philippe Courtois (Royal Military College Saint-Jean) The Great American Protest: African Americans and the Great Migration Cecelia Hartsell (University College Dublin) Lala Lajpat Rai, Indian Nationalism, and the Irish Revolution: The View from New York, 1914-1920 David Brundage (University of California Santa Cruz) Johannesburg's Green Flag: The Contemporaneity of the Easter Rising and the 1922 Rand Rebellion Jonathan Hyslop (Colgate University and University of Pretoria) ã Section Three: North Africa, Asia and the Pacific 1916 in the Middle East and the Global War for Empire Michael Provence (University of California San Diego) "A Tempest in a British Tea Pot": The Arab Question in Cairo and Delhi Erin O'Halloran (University of Oxford) "Revolutionaries, Renegades and Refugees": Anti-British Allegiances in the Context of World War I Stephen McQuillan (Trinity College Dublin) From Dublin to Turgai: Discourses on Small Nations and Violence in the Russian Muslim Press in 1916 Danielle Ross (Utah State University) "To be avoided at all hazards: rebel Irish and syndicalists coming into office": The Easter Rising, Climatic Conditions and the 1916 Australian Referendum on Conscription Daniel Marc Segesser (University of Bern) Section Four: European Responses and Parallels British Labour and Irish Rebels: "Try and Understand" Geoffrey Bell (independent scholar) The Execution of Cesare Battisti: Loyalty, Citizenship, and Empire in the Trentino in World War I Vanda Wilcox (John Cabot University, Rome) "The Same Thing Could Happen in Finland": The Anti-Imperial Moment in Ireland and Finland, 1916-1917 Andrew Newby (University of Helsinki) Early Risers and Late Sleepers: The Easter Rising and the Poznanian Uprising of 1918/19 Compared Roisin Healy (NUI Galway).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138749993 20180514
The year 1916 has recently been identified as "a tipping point for the intensification of protests, riots, uprisings and even revolutions." Many of these constituted a challenge to the international pre-war order of empires, and thus collectively represent a global anti-imperial moment, which was the revolutionary counterpart to the later diplomatic attempt to construct a new world order in the so-called Wilsonian moment. Chief among such events was the Easter Rising in Ireland, an occurrence that took on worldwide significance as a challenge to the established order. This is the first collection of specialist studies that aims at interpreting the global significance of the year 1916 in the decline of empires.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138749993 20180514
Green Library
Book
vii, 189 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
  • List of Figures List of Tables List of Maps Acknowledgements Chapter 1. Partial History Chapter 2. Representations of Modern Life in 1938 Chapter 3. Glasgow's Empire Exhibition Chapter 4. Big Screen Televisions and Push-button Radios Chapter 5. The Adelphi Building Chapter 6. Picture Post - The Modernity of Everyday Life Chapter 7. Cars, Coaches and Charabancs at the Prospect Inn Chapter 8. Britain's New Airports Chapter 9. Conclusion Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474285018 20180226
In 1938: Modern Britain, Michael John Law demonstrates that our understanding of life in Britain just before the Second World War has been overshadowed by its dramatic political events. 1938 was the last year of normality, and Law shows through a series of case studies that in many ways life in that year was far more modern than might have been thought. By considering topics as diverse as the opening of a new type of pub, the launch of several new magazines, the emergence of push-button radios and large screen televisions sets, and the building of a huge office block, he reveals a Britain, both modern and intrigued by its own modernity, that was stopped in its tracks by war and the austerity that followed. For some, life in Britain was as consumerist, secular, Americanized and modern as it would become for many in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Presenting a fresh perspective on an important year in British social history, illuminated by six engaging case studies, this is a key study for students and scholars of 20th-century Britain.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474285018 20180226
Green Library
Book
430 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
209 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
At the end of the ninth century AD, a large part of what is now England was controlled by the Vikings - heathen warriors from Scandinavia who had been attacking the British Isles for more than a hundred years. Alfred the Great, king of Wessex, was determined to regain the conquered lands but his death in 899 meant that the task passed to his son Edward. In the early 900s, Edward led a great fightback against the Viking armies. He was assisted by the English rulers of Mercia: Lord AEthelred and his wife AEthelflaed (Edward's sister). After her husband's death, AEthelflaed ruled Mercia on her own, leading the army to war and working with her brother to achieve their father's aims. Known to history as the Lady of the Mercians, she earned a reputation as a competent general and was feared by her enemies. She helped to save England from the Vikings and is one of the most famous women of the Dark Ages. This book, published 1100 years after her death, tells her remarkable story.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781910900161 20180828
Green Library
Book
xiv, 250 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Preface Acknowledgments The Making of a Soldier 1882-1914 The Making of an Air Officer 1914-1918 Postwar Senior Leader 1919-1930 The Air Council 1930-1933 The Air Council 1933-1936 Fighter Command 1936-1939 Command in War 1939-1940 The Battle of Britain July-August 1940 The Battle of Britain August-September 1940 The Battle of Britain September-October 1940 The Blitz October-November 1940 Laying Down the Sword 1941-1942 Taking Up the Pen 1942-1951 History and Myth 1951-1970 Coda Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781611689372 20180806
Hugh Dowding was born in 1882 at the apex of British imperial power. He graduated from Winchester and the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and was commissioned into the Royal Regiment of Artillery in 1900. After a dozen years of adventurous, active service as a gunner on the fabled North-West Frontier of the British Indian Empire, Dowding earned a coveted place at the British Army Staff College, Camberley, and then gained his "wings" as a Royal Flying Corps (RFC) pilot in 1914. During the first year of the Great War, Dowding served in combat as a pilot, and on the staff of the RFC Headquarters in France. Promoted to squadron command, he led both a technical testing squadron back home in England and an operational squadron at the front. In 1936, Dowding was assigned the critical task of reorganizing the Air Defense of Great Britain as the first Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief of the new RAF Fighter Command. Dowding remained at the head of Fighter Command through the first year of World War II. He is widely credited with preventing the dismantling of British air defenses during the Battle of France in the spring of 1940, defying pressure from the British Army, Britain's French allies, and His Majesty's Government to send the bulk of the RAF's frontline fighters to the Continent in what Dowding predicted would be a futile effort to stem the German onslaught. While holding back as many of his best fighter aircraft as he could, in June Dowding deployed 11 Group, under his hand-picked lieutenant, Air Vice-Marshal Keith Park, to repulse the Luftwaffe over Dunkirk, covering the evacuation of some 338,000 British and French troops from the Continent. As the Luftwaffe began gradually building up to an all-out air offensive against Great Britain, Dowding marshaled his outnumbered command with skill and caution, accurately assessing the enemy's available strategic options. During the ensuing three months of fighting known as the Battle of Britain the integrated air defense system organized and trained by Dowding, guided by his operational concepts, fought the vaunted Luftwaffe to a standstill in daylight air-to-air combat. In October, the Germans abandoned their attempt to win a "decisive battle" for air superiority over England, turning instead to the protracted campaign of attrition by nighttime area bombing known as the Blitz. The historical significance of Dowding's life and military career rests primarily on two elements. First, as the original AOC-in-Chief, RAF Fighter Command, he directed the initial planning, organization, training, and equipment of the world's first truly integrated air defense system. Second, he directed the operations of Fighter Command during the Battle of Britain, the first sustained engagement between independent air forces in military history, and one of the campaigns whose outcomes turned the course of World War II. Dowding was thus not only one of the master builders of air power, but also the only Airman to have been the winning commander in one of history's decisive battles.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781611689372 20180806
Green Library
Book
xi, 212 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Between the fourteenth and sixteenth centuries, the rise of international trade, the growth of towns and cities, and the politics of diplomacy all helped to foster productive and far-reaching connections and cultural interactions between Britain and Italy; equally, the flourishing of Italian humanism from the late fourteenth century onwards had a major impact on intellectual life in Britain. The aim of this book is to illustrate the continuity and the variety of these exchanges during the period. Each chapter focuses on a specific area (book collection, historiography, banking, commerce, literary production), highlighting the significance of the productive interchange of people and ideas across diverse cultural communities; it is the lived experience of individuals, substantiated by written evidence, that shapes the book's collective understanding of how two European cultures interacted with each other so fruitfully. Michele Campopiano is Senior Lecturer in Medieval Latin Literature at the University of York; Helen Fulton is Professor of Medieval Literature at the University of Bristol. Contributors: Helen Bradley, Margaret Bridges, Michele Campopiano, Carolyn Collette, Victoria Flood, Helen Fulton, Bart Lambert, Ignazio del Punta.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781903153697 20180820
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
323 pages : illustrations, genealogical table ; 24 cm
  • Introduction 1 The Lady Anne Clifford's Memoir, 1603 2 Countess of Dorset's Diary, 1616, 1617 and 1619 3 The Life of Me the Lady Anne Clifford, 1589-1649 4 The Lady of the North, Yearly Memoirs, 1650-75 5 Countess of Pembroke's Daybook, 1676 Index -- .
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781526117885 20180312
Anne Clifford (1590-1676) was a prominent noble woman in the seventeenth century. During her long life she experienced the courts of Elizabeth, James and Charles I. She fought a decades long battle to secure her inheritance of the Clifford lands of the north, providing a spirited and legally robust defense of her rights despite the opposition of powerful men, including James I. She eventually inherited the Clifford lands, and she describes her subsequent struggles to reclaim her authority in these lands still mired in the civil wars. Her autobiographies reveal her joys and griefs within a vivid description of seventeenth-century life. They reveal a personality that was vulnerable and determined; charitable and canny. Her autobiographies provide a window into a vibrant world of seventeenth-century life as lived by this complex and intriguing seventeenth-century woman. -- .
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781526117885 20180312
Green Library
Book
172 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm
In 1915, Archie Bowman, a philosophy professor at Princeton, was granted leave of absence to join the British army. He served in the HLI and was captured at the Battle of the Lys. Prison camp, though, turned out not to be the living death he expected: he was fluent in German and became the main go-between with camp authorities and British prisoners; he gave talks to hundreds of prisoners, and wrote up in verse form his account of the battle and his capture and two-day march into captivity. When he was transferred to another camp, his writings were confiscated; but in his new camp his responsibilities increased, and he became key negotiator and formed a bond with the Commandant, a fellow academic, who secured the release of his confiscated work, which, when completed, was published as prison camp verses. After the Armistice, he was posted to the British Army of the Rhine in Cologne, where he found his most interesting work in the service, interviewing German civilians wishing to travel into another Occupied Zone. Although Bowman didn't become a pacifist he was convinced more could be done to prevent wars; and he dedicated himself to the cause of peace and championed the ideal of the League of Nations, at the cost of his health. Based on the archived Bowman Papers, it is a fascinating story of a man of high principle and great depth of feeling who had the love and support of his wife Mabel.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781526728050 20180730
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xviii, 252 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color), maps ; 25 cm
Ardkinglas is a 45,000-acre estate in Cairndow, a beautiful area of the Highlands at the head of Loch Fyne. Sir Andrew Noble, the author's great-grandfather, bought the estate in 1905 and his family have run it ever since. The estate has become famous throughout Scotland and beyond for the Loch Fyne Oyster Bar, founded by Christina Noble's brother, Johnny. This book is not just about the Nobles but the community Ardkinglas has become, the people who make and have made it and the story of how they have lived and worked. This is not a nostalgic memoir of the Noble family, a Downton Abbey saga of life in `The Big House'. Christina Noble's aim is to try to capture the feeling of what it was like for all of the community, employers and employees, to live on a classic Highland estate during the twentieth century. It is a vivid tale, built up from letters and household diaries covering some periods and estate journals covering others. More recent decades are coloured by the personal memories of the author and many others who lived there, whose voices have been carefully recorded for this book. Ardkinglas: The Biography of a Highland Estate is illustrated throughout with pictures of the people who called Ardkinglas home, the places they knew and the activities which occupied them. As their stories are told, some key questions emerge. A Highland estate in the modern world: what is it for? What keeps it going? Who gets the benefit?
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781780274867 20180828
Green Library
Book
xvi, 374 pages : maps ; 24 cm
This is the first such study of Operation Banner, the British Army's campaign in Northern Ireland. Drawing upon extensive interviews with former soldiers, primary archival sources including unpublished diaries and unit log-books, this book closely examines soldiers' behaviour at the small infantry-unit level (Battalion downwards), including the leadership, cohesion and training that sustained, restrained and occasionally misdirected soldiers during the most violent period of the Troubles in Northern Ireland. It contends that there are aspects of wider scholarly literatures - including from sociology, anthropology, criminology, and psychology - that can throw new light on our understanding of the British Army in Northern Ireland. It also offers fresh insights and analysis of incidents involving the British Army during the early years of Operation Banner, including the 1972 `Pitchfork murders' of Michael Naan and Andrew Murray in County Fermanagh, and that of Warrenpoint hotel owner Edmund Woolsey in South Armagh. The central argument of this book is that British Army small infantry units enjoyed considerable autonomy during the early years of Operation Banner and could behave in a vengeful, highly aggressive or benign and conciliatory way as their local commanders saw fit. The strain of civil-military relations at a senior level was replicated operationally as soldiers came to resent the limitations of waging war in the UK. The unwillingness of the Army's senior leadership to thoroughly investigate and punish serious transgressions of standard operating procedures in Northern Ireland created uncertainty among soldiers over expected behaviour and desired outcomes. Overly aggressive groups of soldiers could also be mistaken for high-functioning units - with negative consequences for the Army's overall strategy in Northern Ireland.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786941039 20180416
Green Library
Book
xiii, 169 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), maps (chiefly color) ; 25 cm
The first in-depth look at the Arundel Campaign, one of the forgotten episodes of the English Civil War 1642. War between King Charles 1 and parliament had become inevitable. Throughout 1642 and 1643, the king and parliament contended for ground in the West and South of England, and many towns in strategic locations were subjected to full-scale battle and siege. Arundel was one of these. Between Autumn 1642 and January 1644, Arundel Castle changed hands four times. The book takes the reader back to that age, summarising the causes of the Civil War, looking at past and present Arundel and introducing the main characters of the Arundel Campaign - among them two former friends and now opposing Generals: Sir Ralph Hopton, ardent royalist, and Sir William Waller, the committed parliamentarian. The most gripping part of the story is the final contest for possession of the castle and its subsequent defeat which has had considerable consequences, both locally and nationally. Arundel at War is a lively piece of historical detective work which takes the reader into the heart of the action, presenting an enthralling story of combat, courage and endurance. Thanks to the many visual aids provided such as colour photographs and early engravings, the reader is able to better visualise the action. This is a fresh, well-researched account of an episode that is typically dismissed in a few paragraphs but which deserves better recognition.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781789010152 20180717
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxvii, 330 pages ; 23 cm
Green Library
Book
xx, 492 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 25 cm
The period c. 1200-1600 was marked by the achievements and decline of the Anglo-Norman colony in Ireland, refashioning of Gaelic elite identity, Reformation, and reassertion of English control that led to Plantation projects, bringing new people and ideas to the island. This collection explores the complexities and predicaments of identity, and the cultural practices used to express and underpin them in this key period, ranging from the micro-scale and personal to the macro-scale emergence of ideas of national identity. The authors consider the extent to which there was a relational character to identities in Ireland, whereby senses of being were constructed through engagements with others, and how the power of the past, in both framing and providing stability for identity formulations, is explicit in the ways in which groups intentionally evoked their own histories and connections to place, to reaffirm and bolster identity and solidarity. Cultural practices could become naturalised through repetition and, as reflections of identity, they were formed, transformed or abandoned when necessary or expedient.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781782052609 20180723
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
191 pages ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
341 pages ; 24 cm
Patrick Wright's memoir opens on a diplomatic crisis. A growing number of countries are threatening to boycott the Commonwealth Games in protest of the British government's handling of South African apartheid. And the problems only get worse. Patrick Wright was one of the pre-eminent diplomats of his day, putting him at the forefront of some of the late twentieth century's most important global events. His six years at the FCO found him dealing with the backlash from the Falklands War, the collapse of the Soviet Union, strained relations with the EU, the First Gulf War and, perhaps most challenging of all, the `fire and glares' of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Lord Wright's account is not only an essential documentation of a significant historical period, but witty and entertaining throughout. He revels in gossip, despairs at the mischievous press `painting lurid pictures of Britain versus the Rest', recalls numerous amusing scenarios and is rather brutal in his assessment of various high- profile political figures.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781785903380 20180403
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
209 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Barely 17 years after the Great War that had brought Britain to its knees, the country was once again asked to make sacrifices and give their all to the war effort. With its strong industrial background, Birmingham was already geared to help manufacture the vehicles that could be adapted for war use, and with the threat of the German Luftwaffe screaming across the skies, it was only right that the production of planes, most notably the spitfire, was ramped up to help protect the British public. While many of its men and women were involved in the forces abroad, many more stayed behind to defend the city, with inhabitants risking their lives by taking up fire hoses, first aid kits, manning anti-aircraft guns and positioning barrage balloons in order to save others from the devastating destruction of the Blitz. Meanwhile, the city's children were separated from their families to escape the worst of the bombing and would return from their adventures changed: not all host evacuee families were as kind or as welcoming to their charges as it would appear. Yet not everyone was so patriotic and keen to do their bit, and the opportunity for crime and to fiddle the rations with black market goods was rife. Not even Government issue equipment was off limits, as one Birmingham gang of sandbag thieves demonstrated. For Birmingham, the Second World War was a time of great hardship and sacrifice and the hard work continued for many years after, as its people painstakingly rebuilt parts of the bomb-damaged city.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781473866973 20180717
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
349 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Blossom is an account of Scotland at the grassroots through the stories of people I've had the good fortune to know - the most stubborn, talented and resilient people on the planet. They've had to be. Some have transformed their parts of Scotland. Some have tried and failed. But all have something in common - they know what it takes for Scotland to blossom. We should too... /em> Weeding out vital components of Scottish identity from decades of political and social tangle is no mean task, but it's one journalist Lesley Riddoch has undertaken. Dispensing with the tired, yo-yoing jousts over fiscal commissions, Devo Something and EU in-or-out, Blossom pinpoints both the buds of growth and the blight that's holding Scotland back. Drawing from its people and history as well as the experience of the Nordic countries, and the author's own passionate and outspoken perspective, this is a plain-speaking but incisive call to restore equality and control to local communities and let Scotland flourish. A brilliant, moving, well written, informative, important and valuable piece of work. ELAINE C SMITH Not so much an intervention in the independence debate as a heartfelt manifesto for a better democracy. ESTHER BREITENBACH, Scotsman.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781912147526 20180702
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 193 page : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.
  • Britain: the final frontier
  • Wife, queen, Roman?
  • Family and freedom
  • We learned these things from the romans
  • Dux femina
  • I call upon you, Andraste
  • The wolf and the hare
  • Epilogue: warrior woman.
Boudica introduces readers to the life and literary importance of Boudica through juxtaposing her literary characterizations in Tacitus and Cassius Dio with those of other women and rebel leaders. Literary comparisons assist in the understanding of Boudica as a barbarian, queen, mother, commander in war, and leader of revolt.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190609078 20180409
Green Library