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Book
263 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
79, 49 pages ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
4 volumes in 2 ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
800 p. ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
384 p. ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 245 pages ; 22 cm
  • Introduction: Crossroads and intersections
  • What is Islamophobia?
  • The roots of modern Islamophobia
  • A reoriented "clash of civilizations"
  • War on terror, war on Muslims
  • A "radical" or imagined threat?
  • Between anti-black racism and Islamophobia
  • The fire next time
  • Epilogue: Homecomings and goings.
"I remember the four words that repeatedly scrolled across my mind after the first plane crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City. `Please don't be Muslims, please don't be Muslims.' The four words I whispered to myself on 9/11 reverberated through the mind of every Muslim American that day and every day after.... Our fear, and the collective breath or brace for the hateful backlash that ensued, symbolize the existential tightrope that defines Muslim American identity today." The term "Islamophobia" may be fairly new, but irrational fear and hatred of Islam and Muslims is anything but. Though many speak of Islamophobia's roots in racism, have we considered how anti-Muslim rhetoric is rooted in our legal system? Using his unique lens as a critical race theorist and law professor, Khaled A. Beydoun captures the many ways in which law, policy, and official state rhetoric have fueled the frightening resurgence of Islamophobia in the United States. Beydoun charts its long and terrible history, from the plight of enslaved African Muslims in the antebellum South and the laws prohibiting Muslim immigrants from becoming citizens to the ways the war on terror assigns blame for any terrorist act to Islam and the myriad trials Muslim Americans face in the Trump era. He passionately argues that by failing to frame Islamophobia as a system of bigotry endorsed and emboldened by law and carried out by government actors, U.S. society ignores the injury it inflicts on both Muslims and non-Muslims. Through the stories of Muslim Americans who have experienced Islamophobia across various racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic lines, Beydoun shares how U.S. laws shatter lives, whether directly or inadvertently. And with an eye toward benefiting society as a whole, he recommends ways for Muslim Americans and their allies to build coalitions with other groups. Like no book before it, American Islamophobia offers a robust and genuine portrait of Muslim America then and now.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520297791 20180416
Law Library (Crown)
Book
271 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
191 p. ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
175 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
439 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
127 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

12. Azmat al-Bukhārī [2018]

Book
231 pages ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
166 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvii, 212 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations ixPreface and Acknowledgments xiNote on Spelling, Transliteration, and Italicization xviiMap of Aceh xixIntroduction: Inner Islam and the Problem of Acehnese Exceptionalism 1A Narrative of Violence and Piety 2Religious Agency and Ethical Improvement: An Interactive Approach 6Ordinary Ethics, Moral Failure, and the Sense of a Life Unfolding 10Islam in Aceh as a Subject of Study 14Fieldwork 17Organization of the Book 231 History and the Imagining of Pious Aceh 26Reconfigurations of Authority 28Islam and the Imperial War 33Belief and Practice in a Society in Flux 38Islamic Activism 44Violence and the Transformation of the Public Sphere 48Conclusion 512 The Limits of Normative Islam 53Occupation, Revolution, Rebellion 56Exemplars of Reform 60The Limits of Normative Islam 63Villages in the New Order 67 The Lheueh Dispute 71Conclusion 753 Village Society and the Problem of Moral Authority 77Beyond the Politics of Violence and Grief 78A Crisis of Solidarity 82Generation and the Perception of Moral Authority 88The Theft from the Dayah 92"My Father Is a Good Man but Too Stubborn" 97Village Politics and the Reconceptualization of Local Leadership 100Conclusion 1034 Islamic Scripturalism and Everyday Life after the Disaster 105Routines and Debates in a Tsunami-Affected Neighborhood 107A Lost Zeal for Business 111Heaven Lies under Mother's Feet 115Money, Piety, and Senses of Community 118Age, Life Phase, and the Inward Turn 123Conclusion 1295 Becoming Better Muslims: Sinning, Repentance, Improvement 131Sinning, ShariÊ¿a, and the Moral Pressures of the Postwar, Post-tsunami Moment 132Early Life Discipline, Older Age Consciousness: The Repentance of Rahmat 137The Responsibilities of Yani 143Aris, Indra, and the Morality of Failure and Success 148The Knowledge of Sins: Competing Models of Ethical Improvement? 153Conclusion 158Conclusion 159Notes 171Glossary and Abbreviations 185References 191Index 207.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691176659 20171227
How do ordinary Muslims deal with and influence the increasingly pervasive Islamic norms set by institutions of the state and religion? Becoming Better Muslims offers an innovative account of the dynamic interactions between individual Muslims, religious authorities, and the state in Aceh, Indonesia. Relying on extensive historical and ethnographic research, David Kloos offers a detailed analysis of religious life in Aceh and an investigation into today's personal processes of ethical formation. Aceh is known for its history of rebellion and its recent implementation of Islamic law. Debunking the stereotypical image of the Acehnese as inherently pious or fanatical, Kloos shows how Acehnese Muslims reflect consciously on their faith and often frame their religious lives in terms of gradual ethical improvement. Revealing that most Muslims view their lives through the prism of uncertainty, doubt, and imperfection, he argues that these senses of failure contribute strongly to how individuals try to become better Muslims. He also demonstrates that while religious authorities have encroached on believers and local communities, constraining them in their beliefs and practices, the same process has enabled ordinary Muslims to reflect on moral choices and dilemmas, and to shape the ways religious norms are enforced. Arguing that Islamic norms are carried out through daily negotiations and contestations rather than blind conformity, Becoming Better Muslims examines how ordinary people develop and exercise their religious agency.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691176659 20171227
Green Library
Book
xiii, 327 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm.
  • Contents List of Figures and Tables Notes on Contributors Introduction â Marlene Laruelle Part 1: What Does It Mean to Be a Muslim in Today's Central Asia? 1 How `Muslim' are Central Asian Muslims? A Historical and Comparative Enquiry â Galina Yemelianova 2 Two Countries, Five Years: Islam in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan Through the Lens of Public Opinion Surveys â Barbara Junisbai, Azamat Junisbai, and Baurzhan Zhussupov 3 Uzbekness and Islam: A Survey-based Analysis of Identity in Uzbekistan â Yaacov Roʾi and Alon Wainer Part 2: Islam, Politics, and the State 4 The Islamic Revival Party of Tajikistan: Episodes of Islamic Activism, Postconflict, Accommodation, and Political Marginalization â Tim Epkenhans 5 Power, "Original" Islam, and the Reactivation of a Religious Utopia in Kara-Suu, Kyrgyzstan â Aurelie Biard 6 Islamic Finance and the State in Central Asia â Alexander Wolters Part 3: Islam in Evolving Societies and Identities 7 Visual Culture and Islam in Kazakhstan: The Case of Asyl Arna's Social Media â Wendell Schwab 8 Playing Cosmopolitan: Muslim Self-fashioning, Migration, and (Be-)Longing in the Tajik Dubai Business Sector â Manja Stephan-Emmrich 9 Informal Economies in the Post-Soviet Space: Post-Soviet Islam and Its Role in Ordering Entrepreneurship in Central Asia â Rano Turaeva Part 4: Female Attire as a Public Debate 10 The War of Billboards: Hijab, Secularism, and Public Space in Bishkek â Emil Nasritdinov and Nurgul Esenamanova 11 Hijab in a Changing Tajik Society â Shahnoza Nozimova 12 Switching to Satr: An Ethnography of the Particular in Women's Choices in Head Coverings in Tajikistan â Marintha Miles Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004306806 20180213
This volume explores the changing place of Islam in contemporary Central Asia, understanding religion as a "societal shaper" - a roadmap for navigating quickly evolving social and cultural values. Islam can take on multiple colors and identities, from a purely transcendental faith in God to a cauldron of ideological ferment for political ideology, via diverse culture-, community-, and history-based phenomena. The volumes discusses what it means to be a Muslim in today's Central Asia by looking at both historical and sociological features, investigates the relationship between Islam, politics and the state, the changing role of Islam in terms of societal values, and the issue of female attire as a public debate. Contributors include: Aurelie Biard, Tim Epkenhans, Nurgul Esenamanova, Azamat Junisbai, Barbara Junisbai, Marlene Laruelle, Marintha Miles, Emil Nasritdinov, Shahnoza Nozimova, Yaacov Ro'i, Wendell Schwab, Manja Stephan-Emmrich, Rano Turaeva, Alon Wainer, Alexander Wolters, Galina M. Yemelianova, Baurzhan Zhussupov.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004306806 20180213
Green Library
Book
vi, 172 pages ; 24 cm
  • Preface Acknowledgements Introductory Material Texts Significance Uses Figures and Groups A-Z Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780567666017 20180312
The Bible and the Qur'an provides an overview of all the figures and groups who are mentioned in both the Bible and the Qur'an. Principal focus centres on the similarities and differences between the presentations of these characters in the two texts, with special emphasis placed on how they appear in the Islamic text. References are also included to how many of the individuals/groups discussed are treated in other Islamic sources. Each figure or group includes: (1) a list of relevant Qur'an passages; (2) a description of how the individual/group is presented in the Islamic Texts; (3) questions and issues to consider; (4) suggestions for further readings. An introductory section provides a basic orientation to the Qur'an and other Islamic sources.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780567666017 20180312
Green Library
Book
xvi, 188 pages : illustrations, map ; 22 cm.
  • PART I.- Introduction-- definitions, history and context.- Arabic and Muslim Historiography.- Muslim Shrines in European Descriptions of Palestine.- PART II.- Shrines Sponsored by Sultans.- Major Sufi Shrines.- Shaykh's Tombs.- Shi'a, Druze and Bahai Shrines.- PART III.- Destruction, neglect and appropriation-- The demise of Muslim Shrines.- Heritage and Conservation.- Conclusions.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811069642 20180219
This pivot sets Muslim shrines within the wider context of Heritage Studies in the Muslim world and considers their role in the articulation of sacred landscapes, their function as sites of cultural memory and their links to different religious traditions. Reviewing the historiography of Muslim shrines paying attention to the different ways these places have been studied, through anthropology, archaeology, history, and religious studies, the text discusses the historical and archaeological evidence for the development of shrines in the region from pre-Islamic times up to the present day. It also assesses the significance of Muslim shrines in the modern Middle East, focusing on the diverse range of opinions and treatments from veneration to destruction, and argues that shrines have a unique social function as a means of direct contact with the past in a region where changing political configurations have often distorted conventional historical narratives.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811069642 20180219
Green Library
Book
136 p. ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
189 p. ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vii, 262 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgements 1 Introduction: It Takes Two to Dialogue â 1.1â Letters and Conference Statements â 1.2â Jordanian Roots â 1.3â The Common Word Process and Academia â 1.4â Goal: To Understand What These Men are Doing 2 We Muslims and You Christians: A Common Word between us and You â 2.1â A Complex Text: Structure and Main Argument â 2.2â Textual Forerunners â 2.3â A Common Word: A Second Open Letter â 2.4â Using Sacred Texts â 2.5â Publication, Promotion and Related Dialogue Initiatives â 2.6â Muslims and Christians: Construction of Group Identities â 2.7â What Does acw Do? â 2.8â Conclusion: It Takes Two to Dialogue 3 The First Christian Responses â 3.1â Response from David Ford â 3.2â Senior Church Leaders Respond â 3.3â An Alternative Reading: Michael Nazir-Ali â 3.4â Conclusion 4 Roman Catholic Responses â 4.1â Catholic-Muslim Dialogue since the Second Vatican Council â 4.2â First Official Catholic Responses to acw 74 â 4.3â Five Substantial Commentaries from Four Scholars â 4.4â Catholic-Muslim Dialogue in the Wake of acw 83 â 4.5â Conclusion 5 The Yale Response: Loving God and Neighbor Together â 5.1â An Advertisement in the New York Times â 5.2â Interacting with acw: Arguments, Speech Acts, Construals â 5.3â Bodily Gestures, but Little Flesh â 5.4â Conclusion 6 World Evangelical Alliance: We Too Want to Live in Love, Peace, Freedom and Justice â 6.1â The Text and Its Main Arguments â 6.2â What wwll Does â 6.3â Different Difference â 6.4â Interpreting Evangelicals: Beyond Polite Dialogue? â 6.5â Conclusion 7 World Council of Churches: Learning to Explore Love Together â 7.1â Four Decades of Christian-Muslim Dialogue â 7.2â Learning to Explore Love Together: A Resource Document â 7.3â Conclusion 8 Rowan Williams: A Common Word for the Common Good â 8.1â Background and Context â 8.2â The Text and Its Main Arguments â 8.3â What the Text Does â 8.4â Managing Differences Discursively â 8.5â Conclusion 9 Orthodox Church Leaders: Responses from Five Contexts â 9.1â Response from Archbishop Mor Eustathius Matta Roham, Syrian Orthodox Church of Antioch â 9.2â Response from Catholicos Aram i, Armenian Orthodox Church â 9.3â Response from the See of Etchmiadzin (The Armenian Orthodox Church) â 9.4â Response from Patriarch Alexy ii of Moscow and all Russia â 9.5â Response from Archbishop Chrisostomos ii of Cyprus 10 We Muslims and Christians Together: Statements from Dialogue Conferences â 10.1â Declaration from the Yale University Conference, July 2008 â 10.2â Communique from the Cambridge Conference, October 2008 â 10.3â Declaration from the Catholic-Muslim Forum, November 2008 â 10.4â Statement from the Geneva Consultation, November 2010 â 10.5â Conclusion: acw as Proposition and Invitation 11 Lessons â 11.1â Making Sense of a Common Word â 11.2â Cross-cutting Topics â 11.3â Religion and the Religious â 11.4â The Myth of Interreligious Dialogue â 11.5â A Hermeneutics of Good Will â 11.6â Managing Difference - In-groups and Out-groups Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004355200 20180129
In Common Words in Muslim-Christian Dialogue Vebjorn L. Horsfjord offers an analysis of texts from an international dialogue process between Christian and Muslim leaders. Through detailed engagement with the Muslim dialogue letter A Common Word between Us and You (2007) and a large number of Christian responses to it, the study analyses the dialogue process in the wake of the Muslim initiative and shows how the various texts gain meaning through their interaction. The author uses tools from critical discourse analysis and speech act analysis and claims that the Islamic dialogue initiative became more important as an invitation to Muslim-Christian dialogue than as theological reflection. He shows how Christian leaders systematically chose to steer the dialogue process towards practical questions about peaceful coexistence and away from theological issues.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004355200 20180129
Green Library