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Book
xxxv, 409 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Stand up straight with your shoulders back
  • Treat yourself like someone you are responsible for helping
  • Make friends with people who want the best for you
  • Compare yourself to who you were yesterday, not to who someone else is today
  • Do not let your children do anything that makes you dislike them
  • Set your house in perfect order before you criticize the world
  • Pursue what is meaningful (not what is expedient)
  • Tell the truth
  • or, at least, don't lie
  • Assume that the person you are listening to might know something you don't
  • Be precise in your speech
  • Do not bother children when they are skateboarding
  • Pet a cat when you encounter one on the street
What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson's answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research. Humorous, surprising and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street. What does the nervous system of the lowly lobster have to tell us about standing up straight (with our shoulders back) and about success in life? Why did ancient Egyptians worship the capacity to pay careful attention as the highest of gods? What dreadful paths do people tread when they become resentful, arrogant and vengeful? Dr. Peterson journeys broadly, discussing discipline, freedom, adventure and responsibility, distilling the world's wisdom into 12 practical and profound rules for life. 12 Rules for Life shatters the modern commonplaces of science, faith and human nature, while transforming and ennobling the mind and spirit of its readers."
Green Library
Book
xix, 274 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction : against humanity
  • How violence became inhuman : the making of modern moral sensibilities
  • Gorilla warfare : life in and beyond the bush
  • Beyond reason : magic and science in the LRA
  • Interlude : Re-turn and dis-integration
  • Rebel kinship beyond humanity : love and belonging in the war
  • Rebels and charity cases : politics, ethics, and the concept of humanity
  • Conclusion : beyond humanity, or how do we heal?
"Gunya is a woman in her late twenties. Soldiers of the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) abducted her when she was eleven years old and forcefully conscripted her into the rebel ranks. Gunya spent a little over a decade with the rebels before deserting. While there, she gave birth to a son with Onen, an LRA soldier. Though abducted, she expresses her continued support for the LRA and their tactics, admitting that she sometimes thinks of going back to the lum [bush] when life becomes hard as a civilian at home." This is not a book about crimes against humanity. Rather, it is an indictment of the very idea of humanity, the concept that lies at the heart of human rights and humanitarian missions. Based on fieldwork in northern Uganda, anthropologist and medical doctor Sam Dubal brings readers into the inner circle of the Lord's Resistance Army, an insurgent group accused of rape, forced conscription of children, and inhumane acts of violence. Dubal speaks with former LRA rebels as they find personal meaning in wartime violence, politics, and spirituality-experiences that observers often place outside of humanity's boundaries. What emerges is an unorthodox and provocative question: What would it mean to be truly against humanity? And how does one honor life existing outside hegemonic notions of the good?
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520296107 20180416
Green Library

3. Akhlāq al-Islām [2018]

Book
2 volumes ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvii, 276 pages : illustrations ; 19 cm.
  • Preface
  • What are we talking about?
  • Why bother developing a good character?
  • Helping
  • Harming
  • Lying
  • Cheating
  • Putting the pieces together
  • Some less promising strategies
  • Some strategies with more promise
  • Improving our characters with divine assistance.
We like to think of ourselves, our friends, and our families as pretty decent people. We may not be saints, but we are basically good, fairly honest, relatively kind, and mostly trustworthy. One of the central themes of The Character Gap is that we are badly mistaken in thinking this way. In recent years, hundreds of psychological studies have been done which tell a rather different story. We have serious character flaws that prevent us from being good people, many of which we do not even recognize in ourselves. Does this mean that instead we are wretched people, vicious, cruel or hateful? Christian Miller does not argue that this is necessarily the case either. Instead, the more we put our characters to the test, the more we see that we are a mixed bag. On the one hand, most of us as bystanders will do nothing as someone cries out for help. Even worse, under pressure from authority figures we might kill innocent people. Yet it is also true that there will be many times when we selflessly come to the aid of a complete stranger, or don't lie, steal, or cheat even if we could get away with it. As we embark on this journey of putting our characters to the test, some of the main questions will include: What is good character? Why should we bother working to develop a good character? What does the research in psychology suggest about how good (or bad) our characters really are? What secular strategies for improving our characters show a lot of promise? What religious, and specifically Christian, strategies for improving our characters show a lot of promise? In The Character Gap Miller shows not only how mixed our characters tend to be, but also how we can try to bridge the gap between who we are and the virtuous people we should strive to become.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190264222 20180205
Law Library (Crown)
Book
266 pages ; 24 cm
The first history of early modern conversation in English. In the classical period, conversation referred to real conversations, conducted in the leisure time of noble men, and concerned with indefinite philosophical topics. Christianity inflected conversation with universal aspirations during the medieval centuries and the 'ars dictaminis', the art of letter writing, increased the importance of this written analogue of conversation. The Renaissance humanists from Petrarch onward further transformed conversation, and its genre analogues of dialogue and letter, by transforming it into a metaphor of increasing scope. This expanded realm of humanist conversation bifurcated in Renaissance and early modern Europe. 'The Concept of Conversation' traces the way the rise of conversation spread out from the history of rhetoric to include the histories of friendship, the court and the salon, the Republic of Letters, periodical press and women. It revises JUrgen Habermas' history of the emergence of the rational speech of the public sphere as the history of the emergence of rational conversation and puts the emergence of women's speech at the centre of the intellectual history of early modern Europe.Key FeaturesThe first book-length history of early modern conversation in EnglishSynthesizes early modern intellectual history within the frameworks of rhetoric and conversationPlaces the history of women's speech at the heart of the history of early modern rhetoricFuses Habermas' historical-theoretical framework to the history of rhetoric and revises both.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474430104 20180416
Green Library
Book
xl, 378 pages ; 24 cm
  • Current scholarship and orientation
  • The ambiguity of conscience
  • Excursus: a brief history of theories of conscience
  • Intellectualism and bad conscience
  • Intuitionism and bad conscience
  • Voluntarism and bad conscience
  • Emotionalism and bad conscience
  • Personal evil and the essence of conscience
  • The problem of the genesis of conscience
  • Some theories of the development of conscience
  • The reliability of conscience.
Green Library
Book
vii, 231 pages ; 25 cm
  • Why you cannot regulate for virtuous compassion / Paul Snelling
  • Thin "thank yous" : resentment and gratitude in homecoming rituals / Nancy Sherman
  • Role duties, role virtues, and the practice of business / Miguel Alzola
  • Practising professional ethical wisdom : the role of "ethics work" in the social welfare field / Sarah Banks
  • Attachment, detachment and indifference in clinical practice / Peter Toon
  • Creating regulatory environments for practical wisdom and role virtues in medical practice / Justin Oakley
  • Progress in nursing ethics : something old, something new / Ann Gallagher
  • Organizations, character, virtue and the role of professional practices / Geoff Moore
  • The institutional framework of professional virtue / Anne-Marie Søndergaard Christensen
  • Character in the British Army : a precarious professional practice / David Walker
  • Experienced UK nurses and the missing U-curve of virtue-based reasoning / Jinu Varghese and Kristjan Kristjansson
  • Beyond research ethics : how scientific virtue theory reframes and extends responsible conduct of research / Robert T. Pennock
  • Transformation needs an agent : preparing senior professional practitioners to nurture character, virtue and professionalism in their supervisees / Della Fish and Linda de Cossart
  • Practitioner research, practical wisdom and teaching / Wouter Sanderse
  • Why is there lack of growth in character virtues? : an insight into business students across British business schools / Yan Huo and Kristjan Kristjansson.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 296 pages ; 22 cm
  • Foreword: China's encounter with Michael Sandel / Evan Osnos
  • I. Justice, harmony, and community: Community with harmony? A Confucian critique of Michael Sandel / Chenyang Li
  • Individual, family, community, and beyond: Some Confucian reflections on themes in Sandel's Justice / Tongdong Bai
  • Justice as a virtue, justice according to virtues, and - or justice of virtues: a Confucian amendment to Sandel's Idea of Justice / Yong Huang
  • II. Civic virtue and moral education: Sandel's ideas on civic virtue / Zhu Huiling
  • Sandel's Democracy's discontent from a Confucian perspective / Chen Lai
  • III. Pluralism and perfection: Sandel and the Daoist tradition: Gender, moral disagreements, and freedom: Sandel's politics of common good in Chinese contexts / Robin R. Wang
  • Satisfaction, genuine pretending, and perfection: Sandel's The Case against Perfection and Daoism / Paul J. D'Ambrosio
  • IV. Conceptions of the person: Sandel and the Confucian tradition: Theorizing the "person" in Confucian ethics / Roger T. Ames
  • How to think about morality without moral agents / Henry Rosemont Jr.
  • A Sandelian response to Confucian role ethics / Paul J. D'Ambrosio
  • V. Reply by Michael Sandel
  • Learning from Chinese philosophy / Michael J. Sandel.
In Michael Sandel the Chinese have found a guide through the ethical dilemmas created by their swift embrace of a market economy-one whose communitarian ideas resonate with China's own rich, ancient philosophical traditions. This volume explores the connections and tensions revealed in this unlikely episode of Chinese engagement with the West.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674976146 20180213
Green Library
Book
299 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction: Holistic Study of Judaism 1. The Tree of Knowledge: Limits of God's Power Over Chaos 2. Affliction of Love: Rabbinic Moral Psychology 3. Cosmological Halakha: Maimonides's Ethico-Theology 4. Theosphic Torah: A Kabbalist Theory of Justice 5. Before the Law: Buber and Levinas - Totality vs Transcendence 6. Concluding Reflections Postscript: Can Judaism Become Archaic? Appendices.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138578685 20180226
The term Ethical Monotheism is an important marker in Judaism's tumultuous transition into the modern era. The term emerged in the context of culture-wars concerning the question of whether or not Jews could or should become emancipated citizens of modern European states. It appeared in arguments whether or not Judaism could be considered a Religion of Reason-a symbolic, motivational representation of a universal morality, and in debates about whether or not Judaism could or should reform itself into a Religion of Reason. This book is both a decisive departure from such discussions and an attempt to add a further, post-modern, statement to their ongoing development. As departure, it refuses to take for granted a philosophical conception of Religion of Reason as the standard for Ethical Monotheism according to which Judaism was to be evaluated or reformed. As continuation, the book undertakes a phenomenology of Jewish modes of ethical religiosity that allows it to inquire what kind of ethical monotheism Judaism might be. Through sophisticated analysis of select "snapshots, " or "fragments of a hologram, " guided by a robust theory of religion, the author discloses Judaic ethical monotheism as an ongoing wrestling with the meaning of justice. By closely examining five main "snapshots" of this long process-the Bible, rabbinic Judaism, Maimonides, The Zohar, and the modern philosophers, Buber and Levinas-the author offers his own constructive philosophy of Judaism and his own distinctive philosophy of religion. Ethical Monotheism offers a new way to think about Judaism as a religion and as a coherent philosophical debate, and demonstrates the need to integrate philosophy, history, cognitive psychology, anthropology, theology, and history of science in the study of "religion.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138578685 20180226
Green Library
Book
x, 234 pages ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
xxi, 299 pages ; 25 cm
Ethics at the Edges of Law makes the case that religious moralists should treat the discipline of law as a valuable conversation partner, rather than reducing it to a vehicle for enforcing judgments about morality and public policy. Religious moralists should treat the secular law as a source of moral wisdom and conceptual insight, in the same way that they treat the discipline of philosophy. Cathleen Kaveny develops her argument by showing how the work of a range of important contemporary figures in Christian ethics, including John Noonan, Stanley Hauerwas, and Margaret Farley, can be enriched and illuminated by engagement with particular aspects of the American legal tradition. The book is divided into three parts: Part I, "Narratives and Norms, " examines how the workings of the legal tradition can shed light on the development of religious and moral traditions. Part II, "Love, Justice, and Law, " uses particular legal cases and controversies to advance questions about the relationship of love and justice in Christian ethics. Part III, "Legal Categories and Theological Problems, " shows how legal categories and concepts can help reframe and even resolve particular moral controversies within religious communities. Ethics at the Edges of Law jumpstarts a fruitful, mutually engaged conversation between the American legal tradition and the tradition of Christian ethics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190612290 20171218
Green Library
Book
xxi, 299 pages ; 25 cm
  • Tradition and development : engaging John T. Noonan, Jr.
  • Creation and covenant : engaging Stanley Hauerwas
  • Examples and rules : engaging Jeffrey Stout
  • Neighbor love and legal precedent : engaging Gene Outka
  • Compassionate respect and victims' voices : engaging Margaret Farley
  • Covenant fidelity and culture wars : engaging Paul Ramsey
  • Juridical insights and theological disputes : engaging Robert E. Rodes, Jr.
  • Second chances and statutes of limitations : engaging Walter Kasper
  • Legalism and christian ethics : engaging Grisez and Engelhardt
Ethics at the Edges of Law makes the case that religious moralists should treat the discipline of law as a valuable conversation partner, rather than reducing it to a vehicle for enforcing judgments about morality and public policy. Religious moralists should treat the secular law as a source of moral wisdom and conceptual insight, in the same way that they treat the discipline of philosophy. Cathleen Kaveny develops her argument by showing how the work of a range of important contemporary figures in Christian ethics, including John Noonan, Stanley Hauerwas, and Margaret Farley, can be enriched and illuminated by engagement with particular aspects of the American legal tradition. The book is divided into three parts: Part I, "Narratives and Norms, " examines how the workings of the legal tradition can shed light on the development of religious and moral traditions. Part II, "Love, Justice, and Law, " uses particular legal cases and controversies to advance questions about the relationship of love and justice in Christian ethics. Part III, "Legal Categories and Theological Problems, " shows how legal categories and concepts can help reframe and even resolve particular moral controversies within religious communities. Ethics at the Edges of Law jumpstarts a fruitful, mutually engaged conversation between the American legal tradition and the tradition of Christian ethics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190612290 20171218
Law Library (Crown)
Book
58 pages : illustrations ; 18 cm.
Green Library
Book
280 pages ; 21 cm.
  • Pourquoi une éthique des vertus -- Les défis environnementaux et la cause animale -- La considération contre le nihilisme -- Rattacher l'éthique à une philosophie de la corporéité -- Un discours de la méthode -- Genèse de la considération -- Du souci de soi au souci du monde -- L'humilité -- L'humilité, fondement du rapport à soi -- Le rejet du perfectionnisme -- Le souci du monde -- Eloge de l'intranquillité -- L'avenir pleuré d'avance -- Le courage d'avoir peur -- L'eudémonisme ou la profondeur du bonheur -- Qu'est-ce qu'honorer son âme ? -- Vie bonne et vie heureuse -- L'universalisme aujourd'hui -- Le rejet du naturalisme -- Nature humaine et condition humaine -- Un processus d'individuation -- La magnanimité -- Pourquoi Descartes ? -- La générosité -- L'admiration -- L'amour comme existential -- Le renversement de la subjectivité -- L'amour comme célébration du monde -- L'élargissement du sujet -- Connaissance et joie -- L'écosophie -- Les émotions négatives -- Pratiques de la considération -- Transdescendance, vulnérabilité et monde commun -- L'incommensurable et la transdescendance -- Prudence et considération -- La considération comme transdescendance -- Le sens de la mort et le monde commun -- L'éthique ou la traversée de l'impossible -- La liaison ombilicale des vivants -- La subjectivité comme vulnérabilité -- La passivité et le pathique -- La douleur et la souffrance -- Au-delà du soin -- Responsabilité et domination -- La considération en éthique médicale -- Les animaux ou l'épreuve de la considération -- Pitié et empathie -- Naissance, convivance et politique -- Politique de la considération -- L'horizon politique de la considération -- La tentation totalitaire et l'économisme -- Le nouveau-né, visage de la considération -- La convivance -- Coexistence, convivialité et convivance -- Une méthode pour reconfigurer le politique -- Vivre de, vivre avec, vivre pour -- Parcours de la reconnaissance -- Travail, subjectivation et coopération -- Les vertus de la délibération et la civilité -- Considération et féminisme -- S'inspirer de l'éco-féminisme -- Le dépassement des dualismes -- Voies de la considération -- Inconscient, Éros et éducation morale -- Inconscient, pulsions et morale -- Prendre au sérieux les pulsions et la destructivité -- Conscience morale et surmoi -- Les obstacles à la civilisation -- Eros et éducation morale -- Rousseau, professeur de sublime -- Désir et considération -- L'imagination morale et la formation de l'esprit -- La littérature comme aventure morale -- La pensée critique et la parrhêsia -- La dispersion et l'immaturité psychique -- Cultiver l'attention -- Les ressources de l'éco-psychologie -- Esthétique de la considération -- La composante esthétique de la considération -- Les affinités entre la morale et le goût -- Les fausses évidences -- Transdescendance et esthétique -- La considération comme esthétique -- Dépasser l'analogie entre le bien et le beau -- Considération et respect -- L'esthétique de la considération -- L'apport de l'esthétique environnementale
  • Éthique et esthétique de la Terre -- L'union de l'éthique et de l'esthétique -- Conclusion -- Un concile de philosophes -- Une cartographie pour trouver le monde commun -- Une constellation des vertus -- Enclencher un processus civilisationnel.
"Pourquoi avons-nous tant de mal à changer nos styles de vie alors que plus personne ne peut nier que notre modèle de développement a un impact destructeur sur le plan écologique et social ni douter de l'intensité des violences infligées aux animaux ? Relever ce défi implique de combler l'écart entre la théorie et la pratique en développant une éthique des vertus. Au lieu de se focaliser sur les principes ou sur les conséquences de nos actes, celle-ci s'intéresse à nos motivations concrètes, c'est-à-dire aux représentations et aux affects qui nous poussent à agir. Quels traits moraux peuvent nous conduire à être sobres et à avoir du plaisir à faire le bien, au lieu d'être constamment déchirés entre le bonheur et le devoir ? L'éthique de la considération prend sa source dans les morales antiques, mais elle rejette leur essentialisme et s'appuie sur l'humilité et sur la vulnérabilité. Alors que Bernard de Clairvaux fait reposer la considération sur une expérience de l'incommensurable supposant la foi, Corine Pelluchon la définit par la transdescendance. Celle-ci désigne un mouvement d'approfondissement de soi-même permettant au sujet d'éprouver le lien l'unissant aux autres vivants et de transformer la conscience de son appartenance au monde commun en savoir vécu et en engagement. La considération est l'attitude globale sur laquelle les vertus se fondent au cours d'un processus d'individuation dont l'auteur décrit les étapes."--Page 4 of cover.
Green Library
Book
xi, 187 pages ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Normative Ethical Theorizing as an Explanatory Project 2. How Should We Choose between Competing Explanatory Stories? 3. Against Monism 4. Against Rossian Pluralism 5. Non-Rossian Pluralism 6. The Question of Scope, Part I: Distributive Moral Concerns 7. The Question of Scope, Part II: Non-Distributive Moral Concerns 8. Doing Harm and Failing to Rescue 9. The Distribution of Health Care Resources 10. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138307353 20180326
Explaining Right and Wrong aims to shake the foundations of contemporary ethics by showing that moral philosophers have been deploying a mistaken methodology in their efforts to figure out the truth about what we morally ought to do. Benjamin Sachs argues that moral theorizing makes sense only if it is conceived of as an explanatory project and carried out accordingly. The book goes on to show that the most prominent forms of moral monism-consequentialism, Kantianism, and contractarianism/contractualism-as well as Rossian pluralism, each face devastating explanatory objections. It offers in place of these flawed options a brand-new family of normative ethical theories, non-Rossian pluralism. It then argues that the best kind of non-Rossian pluralism will be spare; in particular, it will deny that an action can be wrong in virtue of constituting a failure to distribute welfare in a particular way or that an action can be wrong in virtue of constituting a failure to rescue. Furthermore, it also aims to show that a great deal of contemporary writing on the distribution of health care resources in cases of scarcity is targeted at questions that either have no answers at all or none that ordinary moral theorizing can uncover.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138307353 20180326
Green Library
Book
viii, 334 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Part I: 1. Introduction: empathy, sympathy, concern and moral agency Neil Roughley and Thomas Schramme-- Part II. Empathy, Sympathy and Concern: 2. Empathy, altruism, and helping: conceptual distinctions, empirical relations Dan Batson-- 3. Self-recognition, empathy and concern for others in toddlers Doris Bischof-Koehler and Norbert Bischof-- Part III. Understanding Empathy: 4. Self-simulation and empathy Heidi Maibom-- 5. Empathy as an instinct Michael Slote-- 6. A moral account of empathy and fellow feeling Lawrence Blum-- Part IV. Fellow Feeling and the Development of Pro Sociality: 7. Empathy-related responding and its relations to positive development Nancy Eisenberg-- 8. An interdisciplinary perspective on the origins of concern for others: contributions from psychology, neuroscience, philosophy, and sociobiology Carolyn Zahn-Waxler, Andrew Schoen and Jean Decety-- 9. Sophisticated concern in early childhood Amrisha Vaish-- Part V. Empathy and Morality: 10. Is empathy required for making moral judgements? John Deigh-- 11. The empathy in moral obligation. An exercise in creature construction Neil Roughley-- 12. Empathy and reciprocating attitudes Stephen Darwall-- 13. The role of empathy in an agential account of morality: lessons from autism and psychopathy Thomas Schramme.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107109513 20180226
What is the basis of our capacity to act morally? This is a question that has been discussed for millennia, with philosophical debate typically distinguishing two sources of morality: reason and sentiment. This collection aims to shed light on whether the human capacity to feel for others really is central for morality and, if so, in what way. To tackle these questions, the authors discuss how fellow feeling is to be understood: its structure, content and empirical conditions. Also discussed are the exact roles that relevant psychological features - specifically: empathy, sympathy and concern - may play within morality. The collection is unique in bringing together the key participants in the various discussions of the relation of fellow feeling to moral norms, moral concepts and moral agency. By integrating conceptually sophisticated and empirically informed perspectives, Forms of Fellow Feeling will appeal to readers from philosophy, psychology, sociology and cultural studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107109513 20180226
Green Library
Book
xiii, 303 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction Part I: Justification 1. Internalism as a Thin Deontological Concept 2. The Regulative and the Theoretical 3. Epistemic Deontologism & Control 4. Epistemic Agency and Executive Control 5. The Ineliminability of Internalism Part II: Freedom 6. Ought Implies Can 7. The Lazy Argument 8. Transcendental Arguments for Freedom I 9. Self-determination and Determination by Reasons 10. Transcendental Arguments for Freedom II Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781350029040 20180319
In the first in-depth study of the transcendental argument for decades, Free Will and Epistemology defends a modern version of the famous transcendental argument for free will: that we could not be justified in undermining a strong notion of free will, as a strong notion of free will is required for any such process of undermining to be itself epistemically justified. By arguing for a conception of internalism that goes back to the early days of the internalist-externalist debates, it draws on work by Richard Foley, William Alston and Alvin Plantinga to explain the importance of epistemic deontology and its role in the transcendental argument. It expands on the principle that `ought' implies `can' and presents a strong case for a form of self-determination. With references to cases in the neuroscientific and cognitive-psychological literature, Free Will and Epistemology provides an original contribution to work on epistemic justification and the free will debate.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781350029040 20180319
Green Library
Book
xiv, 293 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
Green Library
Book
xx, 107 pages ; 24 cm
Green Library
Book
1 volume (various pagings) ; 21 cm
  • Moral philosophy and moral reasoning
  • Cultural relativism
  • Skepticism and subjectivism
  • Free will and moral responsibility
  • Religion and natural law
  • Egoism
  • The social contract
  • Utilitarianism : Bentham and Mill
  • Challenges for utilitarianism
  • Deontology : Kant
  • Challenges for Kantian ethics
  • Virtue ethics : Aristotle
  • Challenges for virtue ethics
  • The ethics of gender and race
  • Developing a moral outlook
  • Key thinkers.
Rather than telling students what to think about moral issues, this NEW text teaches students how to think for themselves. Using real-world examples and vivid illustrations drawn from other disciplines, it challenges preconceived notions about morality and demonstrates why ethics matters. A companion volume, Readings in Moral Philosophy, provides primary selections that amplify issues discussed in the text and extends them to problems in applied ethics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393644081 20171211
Green Library