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Book
xviii, 375 pages ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
xxxv, 409 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Stand up straight with your shoulders back
  • Treat yourself like someone you are responsible for helping
  • Make friends with people who want the best for you
  • Compare yourself to who you were yesterday, not to who someone else is today
  • Do not let your children do anything that makes you dislike them
  • Set your house in perfect order before you criticize the world
  • Pursue what is meaningful (not what is expedient)
  • Tell the truth
  • or, at least, don't lie
  • Assume that the person you are listening to might know something you don't
  • Be precise in your speech
  • Do not bother children when they are skateboarding
  • Pet a cat when you encounter one on the street
What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson's answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research. Humorous, surprising and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street. What does the nervous system of the lowly lobster have to tell us about standing up straight (with our shoulders back) and about success in life? Why did ancient Egyptians worship the capacity to pay careful attention as the highest of gods? What dreadful paths do people tread when they become resentful, arrogant and vengeful? Dr. Peterson journeys broadly, discussing discipline, freedom, adventure and responsibility, distilling the world's wisdom into 12 practical and profound rules for life. 12 Rules for Life shatters the modern commonplaces of science, faith and human nature, while transforming and ennobling the mind and spirit of its readers."
Green Library
Book
xi, 288 pages ; 25 cm
  • Forgiveness
  • Forgiveness: Jesus and Paul
  • The banality of forgiveness
  • Forgiving retribution
  • Resentment
  • Resentment: the wound of Philoctetes
  • The British moralist tradition: conscience
  • The continental cultural tradition: collective
  • Apology
  • the unforgiven lives of others
  • Private apologies
  • Public apologies.
Green Library
Book
xix, 274 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction : against humanity
  • How violence became inhuman : the making of modern moral sensibilities
  • Gorilla warfare : life in and beyond the bush
  • Beyond reason : magic and science in the LRA
  • Interlude : Re-turn and dis-integration
  • Rebel kinship beyond humanity : love and belonging in the war
  • Rebels and charity cases : politics, ethics, and the concept of humanity
  • Conclusion : beyond humanity, or how do we heal?
"Gunya is a woman in her late twenties. Soldiers of the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) abducted her when she was eleven years old and forcefully conscripted her into the rebel ranks. Gunya spent a little over a decade with the rebels before deserting. While there, she gave birth to a son with Onen, an LRA soldier. Though abducted, she expresses her continued support for the LRA and their tactics, admitting that she sometimes thinks of going back to the lum [bush] when life becomes hard as a civilian at home." This is not a book about crimes against humanity. Rather, it is an indictment of the very idea of humanity, the concept that lies at the heart of human rights and humanitarian missions. Based on fieldwork in northern Uganda, anthropologist and medical doctor Sam Dubal brings readers into the inner circle of the Lord's Resistance Army, an insurgent group accused of rape, forced conscription of children, and inhumane acts of violence. Dubal speaks with former LRA rebels as they find personal meaning in wartime violence, politics, and spirituality-experiences that observers often place outside of humanity's boundaries. What emerges is an unorthodox and provocative question: What would it mean to be truly against humanity? And how does one honor life existing outside hegemonic notions of the good?
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520296107 20180416
Green Library

5. Akhlāq al-Islām [2018]

Book
2 volumes ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 229 pages ; 24 cm
  • Words matter: on the rhetoric of emotion
  • From "charis" to "gratia": on the political origins of the debt of gratitude
  • "Gratitudo": on Christian gratitude and existential debt
  • "Indebted": on the contemporary gratitude literature
  • "Santosha": on the yoga of gratitude
  • The politics of a sunset: from gratefulness to the common good.
Green Library
Book
xvi, 304 pages ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
x, 304 pages ; 25 cm
  • Part one: Old, wise men
  • In praise of the maggot: John Dunton
  • Politeness vs. honesty, part 1: Lord Chesterfield
  • Funny business: Benjamin Franklin
  • American guru: William Alcott
  • Part two: As a friend
  • Sob sister: Dorothy Dix
  • Happy thoughts: Dale Carnegie
  • Everything changes: Dear Abby and Ann Landers
  • Indulgence is a virtue: Mildred Newman
  • Part three: Experts among us
  • Honorary pants: Sylvia Porter
  • Doctor's orders: Benjamin Spock
  • Death's best friend: Elizabeth Kübler-Ross
  • Guide to the stars: Joan Quigley
  • Part four: Advice for all, by all
  • Stand by me: Harville Hendrix and Helen Hunt
  • Politeness vs. honesty, part 2: Judith Martin
  • How to coach a life coach: Martha Beck
  • The king of Quora: Michael King.
A delightful history of the American obsession with advice and self-help, told through the lives and wisdom of three centuries of advice-givers -- from Poor Richard to Dr. Spock to Miss Manners. Americans, for all our talk of pulling themselves up by our bootstraps, obsessively seek advice on matters large and small. Perhaps precisely because we believe in bettering ourselves and our circumstances in life, we ask for guidance constantly. And this has been true since our nation's earliest days: from the colonial era on, there have always been people eager to step up and offer advice, some of it lousy, some of it thoughtful, but all of it read and debated by generations of Americans. Jessica Weisberg takes readers on a tour of the advice-givers who have made their name, and sometimes their fortune, by telling Americans what to do. You probably don't want to follow all the advice they proffered. Eating graham crackers will not make you a better person, and wearing blue to work won't guarantee a promotion. But for all that has changed in American life, it's a comfort to know that our hang-ups, fears, and hopes have not. We've always loved seeking advice -- so long as it's anonymous, and as long as it's clear that we're not asking for ourselves. We're just asking for a friend.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781568585345 20180618
Green Library
Book
viii, 336 pages : charts ; 23 cm.
In Beyond Disruption: Technology's Challenge to Governance, George P. Shultz, Jim Hoagland, and James Timbie present views from some of the country's top experts in the sciences, humanities, and military that scrutinize the rise of post-millennium technologies in today's global society. They contemplate both the benefits and peril carried by the unprecedented speed of these innovations-from genetic editing, which enables us new ways to control infectious diseases, to social media, whose ubiquitous global connections threaten the function of democracies across the world. Some techniques, like the advent of machine learning, have enabled engineers to create systems that will make us more productive. For example, self-driving vehicles promise to make trucking safer, faster, and cheaper. However, using big data and artificial intelligence to automate complex tasks also ends up threatening to disrupt both routine professions like taxi driving and cognitive work by accountants, radiologists, lawyers, and even computer programmers themselves.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817921453 20180730
Hoover Library
Book
viii, 336 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
In Beyond Disruption: Technology's Challenge to Governance, George P. Shultz, Jim Hoagland, and James Timbie present views from some of the country's top experts in the sciences, humanities, and military that scrutinize the rise of post-millennium technologies in today's global society. They contemplate both the benefits and peril carried by the unprecedented speed of these innovations-from genetic editing, which enables us new ways to control infectious diseases, to social media, whose ubiquitous global connections threaten the function of democracies across the world. Some techniques, like the advent of machine learning, have enabled engineers to create systems that will make us more productive. For example, self-driving vehicles promise to make trucking safer, faster, and cheaper. However, using big data and artificial intelligence to automate complex tasks also ends up threatening to disrupt both routine professions like taxi driving and cognitive work by accountants, radiologists, lawyers, and even computer programmers themselves.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817921453 20180903
Green Library
Book
xxv, 335 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction / Part I: Ancient Origins of the Intellectual-Moral Relationship / 1. Geometry in the Humming of the Strings, Anne Mamary / 2. Plato and the Importance of Mathematical Training, Eva Cadavid / 3. How Practical Wisdom Depends on Moral Excellence, Marcia Homiak / 4. Intellectual Virtue and the Non-Sage in Stoicism, Ryan Korstange / Part II: The Assumption Re-examined / 5. From the Moral to the Intellectual Virtues: The Christian Monastic Tradition, David Bradshaw / 6. Moral and Intellectual Virtues in Jewish Medieval Philosophy, Lenn E. Goodman / 7. Hume and the Intellectual Virtues, Dan O'Brien / 8. Rousseau, the Sciences, and our Knowledge of Virtue, Piers Norris Turner / 9. The Kantian Doctrine of Virtue, Michael Reno / Part III: Specific Virtues and Contemporary Reflections / 10. Intellectual Trust in an Examined Life: On Vicious and Virtuous Trust in Philosophy, Ben Almassi / 11. Virtues, Vices, and Agential Capacity, Jonathan A. Jacobs / 12. Ignorance and Hope, Katherine Johnson / 13. Intellectual Courage, Eric Kraemer / 14. Patience and Practical Wisdom, Matthew Pianalto / 15. Justice and Mercy: On Knowing the Difference, Audrey L. Anton / Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786602374 20180917
The Bright and the Good examines the connection between intellectual and moral virtues both through the history of philosophy and as it can be illustrated in comprehensive examinations of specific virtues. The first part of the book investigates the original assumptions posited by Ancient Western philosophers concerning the apparent connection between moral and intellectual virtues. The second part follows the assumptions through history from the Medieval and Modern periods of philosophy, noting how the assumption has been tweaked to accommodate specific ideological and scientific precepts. The third part showcases inquiries into specific virtues, taking the reader on an investigation unfettered by any specific time period or ideology so as to consider the apparent connection between the moral and the intellectual on a case-by-case basis. These essays relate both historical context and contemporary concerns and examine topics including vice, ignorance, hope, courage, patience, justice and mercy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786602374 20180917
Green Library
Book
199 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvii, 276 pages : illustrations ; 19 cm.
  • Preface
  • What are we talking about?
  • Why bother developing a good character?
  • Helping
  • Harming
  • Lying
  • Cheating
  • Putting the pieces together
  • Some less promising strategies
  • Some strategies with more promise
  • Improving our characters with divine assistance.
We like to think of ourselves, our friends, and our families as pretty decent people. We may not be saints, but we are basically good, fairly honest, relatively kind, and mostly trustworthy. One of the central themes of The Character Gap is that we are badly mistaken in thinking this way. In recent years, hundreds of psychological studies have been done which tell a rather different story. We have serious character flaws that prevent us from being good people, many of which we do not even recognize in ourselves. Does this mean that instead we are wretched people, vicious, cruel or hateful? Christian Miller does not argue that this is necessarily the case either. Instead, the more we put our characters to the test, the more we see that we are a mixed bag. On the one hand, most of us as bystanders will do nothing as someone cries out for help. Even worse, under pressure from authority figures we might kill innocent people. Yet it is also true that there will be many times when we selflessly come to the aid of a complete stranger, or don't lie, steal, or cheat even if we could get away with it. As we embark on this journey of putting our characters to the test, some of the main questions will include: What is good character? Why should we bother working to develop a good character? What does the research in psychology suggest about how good (or bad) our characters really are? What secular strategies for improving our characters show a lot of promise? What religious, and specifically Christian, strategies for improving our characters show a lot of promise? In The Character Gap Miller shows not only how mixed our characters tend to be, but also how we can try to bridge the gap between who we are and the virtuous people we should strive to become.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190264222 20180205
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 265 pages ; 24 cm
Colin Marshall offers a ground-up defense of objective morality, in which the central role is played by compassion. Only compassion, Marshall argues, lets us be in touch with others' motivational mental properties. Compassionate Moral Realism offers a new answer to the question ", a central philosophical concern since Plato.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198809685 20180717
Green Library
Book
1 online resource.
Book
266 pages ; 24 cm
The first history of early modern conversation in English. In the classical period, conversation referred to real conversations, conducted in the leisure time of noble men, and concerned with indefinite philosophical topics. Christianity inflected conversation with universal aspirations during the medieval centuries and the 'ars dictaminis', the art of letter writing, increased the importance of this written analogue of conversation. The Renaissance humanists from Petrarch onward further transformed conversation, and its genre analogues of dialogue and letter, by transforming it into a metaphor of increasing scope. This expanded realm of humanist conversation bifurcated in Renaissance and early modern Europe. 'The Concept of Conversation' traces the way the rise of conversation spread out from the history of rhetoric to include the histories of friendship, the court and the salon, the Republic of Letters, periodical press and women. It revises JUrgen Habermas' history of the emergence of the rational speech of the public sphere as the history of the emergence of rational conversation and puts the emergence of women's speech at the centre of the intellectual history of early modern Europe.Key FeaturesThe first book-length history of early modern conversation in EnglishSynthesizes early modern intellectual history within the frameworks of rhetoric and conversationPlaces the history of women's speech at the heart of the history of early modern rhetoricFuses Habermas' historical-theoretical framework to the history of rhetoric and revises both.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474430104 20180416
Green Library
Book
viii, 311 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Garrett Cullity argues for a conception of morality as founded on three independently important sources: concern for others' welfare, respect for their self-expression, and cooperation in worthwhile collective activity. He explores practical applications of his theory, and how to deal with conflicts between the three sources of morality.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198807841 20180611
Green Library
Book
389 pages ; 22 cm.
  • Le serment des cités des Gaules au roi mérovingien du VIe siècle. Un fondement oublié de la domination royale franque ? -- Quelques réflexions sur les formes de la fides facta -- "Nec in Pace fideles". Fides et foedus en Irlande médiévale (VIIe-Xe s.) -- Paradoxe du féodalisme. L'infidélité de Tassilon de Bavière -- Trust and mistrust in the time of Charlemagne -- La fides prêtée à l'empereur Louis le Pieux par les grands laïques, à l'épreuve de l'épisode du Rotfelth (fin juin 833) -- Fides et gouvernement de la res publica au Xe siècle -- Fides in northern Iberian texts of the ninth and tenth centuries -- Fidélité au roi. Abbon de Fleury, Fulbert et Yves de Chartres -- Rereading the Speach of Otto of Northeim against the Tyranny of Henry IV in Saxony -- Les réactions sociales dans le cadre des serments de fidélité -- Fides et royauté chez les moralistes du XIIIe siècle. L'exemple de Vincent de Beauvais -- Foi et perfidie à la croisade albigeoise selon les troubadours -- La saga de Vigftiss ou les aléas de la foi dans l'Islande des Sturlungar -- Juramentum et (ides dans les statuts universitaires français du Moyen Âge -- Le serment dans l'organisation de la vie publique (espace francophone, XIIIe-XVe siècle) -- Fidélité et allégeance dans le cadre des relations anglo-écossaises -- Fides as Fidelitas in Thomas Aquinas -- La fades des Sarrasins et Man des musulmans dans deux traductions latines du Coran.
"La polysémie du mot fides est manifeste. En latin classique comme médiéval, il signifie confiance, sincérité, promesse, bonne foi, respect de la parole donnée, protection. La diversité des sens attachés à ce terme ne saurait cependant en masquer l'unité conceptuelle : la fides, au sens non-religieux du terme, relève de l'exigence de perfection éthique ; elle est, en tant que telle, omniprésente dans les relations humaines et dans les dynamiques des sociétés du Moyen Âge. Ce recueil de contributions permet d'approfondir la notion et d'évoquer quelques domaines de la vie politique et sociale dans lesquels la fides entre en jeu comme fondement de la relation à autrui."--Page 4 of cover.
Green Library
Book
xl, 378 pages ; 24 cm
  • Current scholarship and orientation
  • The ambiguity of conscience
  • Excursus: a brief history of theories of conscience
  • Intellectualism and bad conscience
  • Intuitionism and bad conscience
  • Voluntarism and bad conscience
  • Emotionalism and bad conscience
  • Personal evil and the essence of conscience
  • The problem of the genesis of conscience
  • Some theories of the development of conscience
  • The reliability of conscience.
Conscience: Phenomena and Theories was first published in German in 1925 as a dissertation by Hendrik G. Stoker under the title Das Gewissen: Erscheinungsformen und Theorien. It was received with acclaim by philosophers at the time, including Stoker's dissertation mentor Max Scheler, Martin Heidegger, and Herbert Spielberg, as quite possibly the single most comprehensive philosophical treatment of conscience and as a major contribution in the phenomenological tradition. Stoker's study offers a detailed historical survey of the concept of conscience from ancient times through the Middle Ages up to more modern thinkers, including Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Freud, and Cardinal Newman. Stoker analyzes not only the concept of conscience in academic theory but also various types of theories of conscience. His work offers insightful discussions of problems and theories related to the genesis, reliability, and validity of conscience. In particular, Stoker analyzes the moral, spiritual, and psychological phenomena connected with bad conscience, which in turn illuminate the concept of conscience. The book is deeply informed by the traditions of western Christianity. Available for the first time in an accessible English translation, with an introduction by its translator and editor, Philip E. Blosser, it promises to be of interest to philosophers, especially in Christian philosophy and phenomenology, and also to all those interested in moral and religious psychology, ethics, religion, and theology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780268103170 20180514
Green Library
Book
vii, 231 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Introduction / David Carr
  • Why you cannot regulate for virtuous compassion / Paul Snelling
  • Thin 'thank yous' : resentment and gratitude in homecoming rituals / Nancy Sherman
  • Role duties, role virtues, and the practice of business / Miguel Alzola
  • Practising professional ethical wisdom : the role of 'ethics work' in the social welfare field / Sarah Banks
  • Attachment, detachment and indifference in clinical practice / Peter Toon
  • Creating regulatory environments for practical wisdom and role virtues in medical practice / Justin Oakley
  • Progress in nursing ethics : something old, something new ... / Ann Gallagher
  • Organizations, character, virtue and the role of professional practices / Geoff Moore
  • The institutional framework of professional virtue / Anne-Marie Søndergaard Christensen
  • Character in the British army : a precarious professional practice / David Walker
  • Experienced UK nurses and the missing U-curve of virtue-based reasoning / Jinu Varghese and Kristján Kristjánsson
  • Beyond research ethics : how scientific virtue theory reframes and extends responsible conduct of research / Robert T. Pennock
  • Transformation needs an agent : preparing senior professional practitioners to nurture character, virtue and professionalism in their supervisees / Della Fish and Linda de Cossart
  • Practitioner research, practical wisdom and teaching / Wouter Sanderse
  • Why is there lack of growth in character virtues? : an insight into business students across British business schools / Yan Huo and Kristján Kristjánsson.
Cultivating Moral Character and Virtue in Professional Practiceã is a pioneering collection of essays focused on the place of character and virtue in professional practice. Professional practices usually have codes of conduct designed to ensureã good conduct; ã butã whileã such codes may be necessary and useful, they appearã far from sufficient, ã since manyã recent public scandals in professional life seem to have been attributable to failures of personal moral character. This book argues that there is a pressing need to devote more attention in professional education to the cultivation or development of such moral qualities as integrity, courage, self-control, service and selflessness. Featuring contributions from distinguished leaders in the application of virtue ethics to professional practice, ã such asã Sarah Banks, Ann Gallagher, Geoffrey Moore, Justin Oakley and Nancy Sherman, the volume looks beyond traditional professions to explore the ethical dimensions of a broad range of important professional practices. Inspired by a successful international and interdisciplinary conference on the topic, the book examines various ways of promoting moral character and virtue in professional life from the general ethical perspective of contemporary neo-Aristotelian virtue theory. The professional concerns of this work are of global significance and the bookã will beã valuableã readingã for allã working inã contemporaryã professionalã practices.ã Itã willã be of particular interest to academics, practitioners and postgraduate students in the fields of education, medicine, nursing, social work, business and commerce and military service.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138742314 20180430
Law Library (Crown)