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Book
vii, 267 pages ; 24 cm
  • Part I. Solid Metaethical Foundations: 1. The standard story-- 2. The beast of two burdens-- 3. Extreme psychologism about reasons-- 4. Truthy-- Part II. Sound Epistemological Structure: 5. Truthy psychologism-- 6. Truthy psychologism gives us everything we want-- 7. If E then EB?-- 8. If TB then E?-- Part III. Fruitful Metaepistemic Soil: 9. Who can tell us why to care about the evidence?-- 10. Truthy psychologism and the authority of evidence.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107188600 20170717
Believable Evidence argues that evidence consists of true beliefs. This claim opens up an entirely overlooked space on the ontology of evidence map, between purely factualist positions (such as those of Williamson and Dancy) and purely psychologist ones (such as that of Conee and Feldman). Velislava Mitova provides a compelling three-level defence of this view in the first contemporary monograph entirely devoted to the ontology of evidence. First, once we see the evidence as a good reason, metaethical considerations show that the evidence must be psychological and veridical. Second, true belief in particular allows epistemologists to have everything they want from the concept of evidence. Finally, the view helps us locate the source of the normative authority of evidence. The book challenges a broad range of current views on the ontology of reasons and their normative authority, making it a must-read for scholars and advanced students in metaethics and epistemology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107188600 20170717
Green Library
Book
viii, 302 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Green Library
Book
xiv, 471 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Green Library
Book
xxiii, 334 pages ; 22 cm
  • Introduction: A game of chess in times of plague
  • Socrates
  • Plato
  • Lucretius
  • Augustine
  • Montaigne
  • Hobbes
  • Hegel
  • Nietzsche
  • Lukacs
  • Heidegger
  • Wittgenstein
  • Adorno
  • Conclusion: The end and the future.
For Raymond Geuss, philosophers' attempts to bypass normal ways of thinking-to point out that the question being asked is itself misguided-represents philosophy at its best. By provoking people to think differently, philosophers make clear that we are not fated to live within the stifling systems of thought we inherit. We can change the subject.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674545724 20171121
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxiii, 334 pages ; 22 cm
  • Introduction
  • Socrates
  • Plato
  • Lucretius
  • Augustine
  • Montaigne
  • Hobbes
  • Hegel
  • Nietzsche
  • Lukács
  • Heidegger
  • Wittgenstein
  • Adorno
  • Conclusion.
For Raymond Geuss, philosophers' attempts to bypass normal ways of thinking-to point out that the question being asked is itself misguided-represents philosophy at its best. By provoking people to think differently, philosophers make clear that we are not fated to live within the stifling systems of thought we inherit. We can change the subject.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674545724 20171121
Green Library

6. Core logic [2017]

Book
xvii, 357 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
Neil Tennant presents an original logical system with unusual philosophical, proof-theoretic, metalogical, computational, and revision-theoretic virtues. Core Logic, which lies deep inside Classical Logic, best formalizes rigorous mathematical reasoning. It captures constructive relevant reasoning. And the classical extension of Core Logic handles non-constructive reasoning. These core systems fix all the mistakes that make standard systems harbor counterintuitive irrelevancies. Conclusions reached by means of core proof are relevant to the premises used. These are the first systems that ensure both relevance and adequacy for the formalization of all mathematical and scientific reasoning. They are also the first systems to ensure that one can make deductive progress with potential logical strengthening by chaining proofs together: one will prove, if not the conclusion sought, then (even better!) the inconsistency of one's accumulated premises. So Core Logic provides transitivity of deduction with potential epistemic gain. Because of its clarity about the true internal structure of proofs, Core Logic affords advantages also for the automation of deduction and our appreciation of the paradoxes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198777892 20171201
Green Library
Book
x, 236 pages ; 22 cm
Moritz Schulz explores counterfactual thought and language: what would have happened if things had gone a different way. Counterfactual questions may concern large scale derivations (what would have happened if Nixon had launched a nuclear attack) or small scale evaluations of minor derivations (what would have happened if I had decided to join a different profession). A common impression, which receives a thorough defence in the book, is that oftentimes we find it impossible to know what would have happened. However, this does not mean that we are completely at a loss: we are typically capable of evaluating counterfactual questions probabilistically: we can say what would have been likely or unlikely to happen. Schulz describes these probabilistic ways of evaluating counterfactual questions and turns the data into a novel account of the workings of counterfactual thought.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198785958 20170321
Green Library
Book
viii, 246 pages ; 22 cm
  • Part I. Potency
  • The age of impotence
  • Humanism, misogyny and late modern thought
  • The dark side of desire
  • Part II. Power
  • Automation and terror
  • Necro-capitalism
  • Money code and automation
  • Part III. Possibility
  • Conundrum
  • Superstition
  • Disentanglement
  • A short history of the general intellect
  • Dynamics of the general intellect
  • Invention
  • Afterword: The inconceivable.
We live in an age of impotence. Stuck between global war and global finance, between identity and capital, we seem to be incapable of producing the radical change that is so desperately needed. Is there still a way to disentangle ourselves from a global order that shapes our politics as well as our imagination? In his most systematic book to date, renowned Italian theorist Franco Berardi tackles this question through a solid yet visionary analysis of the three fundamental concepts of Possibility, Potency, and Power. Characterizing Possibility as the content, Potency as the energy, and Power as the form, Berardi suggests that the road to emancipation unravels from the awareness that the field of the possible is only limited, and not created, by the power structures that implement it. Other futures and other worlds are always already inscribed within the present, despite power's attempt at keeping them invisible. Overcoming any temptation of giving in to despair or nostalgia, Berardi proposes the notion of Futurability as a way to remind us that even within the darkness of our current crisis lies dormant the horizon of possibility.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781784787431 20170829
Green Library
Book
344 p. ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
422 pages ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

11. Inconsistencies [2017]

Book
x, 129 pages ; 18 cm.
Meditations, aphorisms, maxims, notes, and comments construct a philosophy of thought congruent with the inconsistency of our reality.Those who continue to think never return to their point of departure. -- InconsistenciesThese 130 short texts -- aphoristic, interlacing, and sometimes perplexing -- target a perennial philosophical problem: Our consciousness and our experience of reality are inconsistent, fragmentary, and unstable; God is dead, and our identity as subjects discordant. How can we establish a new mode of thought that does not cling to new gods or the false security of rationality? Marcus Steinweg, as he did in his earlier book The Terror of Evidence, constructs a philosophical position from fragments, maxims, meditations, and notes, formulating a philosophy of thought that expresses and enacts the inconsistency of our reality. Steinweg considers, among other topics, life as a game ("To think is to play because no thought is firmly grounded"); sexuality ("wasteful, contradictory, and contingent"); desire ("Desire has a thousand names; It's earned none of them"); reality ("overdetermined and excessively complex"); and world ("a nonconcept"). He disposes of philosophy in one sentence ("Philosophy is a continual process of its own redefinition.") but spends multiple pages on "A Tear in Immanence, " invoking Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, and others. He describes "Wandering with Foucault" ("Thought entails wandering as well as straying into madness") and brings together Derrida and Debord. He poses a question: "Why should a cat be more mysterious than a dog?" and later answers one: "Beauty is truth because truth is beauty." By the end, we have accompanied Steinweg on converging trains of thought. "Thinking means continuing to think, " he writes, adding "But thinking can only pose questions by answering others." The question of inconsistency? Asked and answered, and asked.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262534352 20171127
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 PDF (xiii, 163 pages).
  • * Preface* Introduction* Propositional Logic* Logical Properties and Relationships* Propositional Proofs* Propositional Resolution* Relational Logic* Relational Analysis* Relational Proofs* Herbrand Logic* Herbrand Proofs* Induction* Resolution* Bibliography* Authors' Biographies.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781627056366 20170213
This book is a gentle but rigorous introduction to Formal Logic. It is intended primarily for use at the college level. However, it can also be used for advanced secondary school students, and it can be used at the start of graduate school for those who have not yet seen the material. The approach to teaching logic used here emerged from more than 20 years of teaching logic to students at Stanford University and from teaching logic to tens of thousands of others via online courses on the World Wide Web. The approach differs from that taken by other books in logic in two essential ways, one having to do with content, the other with form. Like many other books on logic, this one covers logical syntax and semantics and proof theory plus induction. However, unlike other books, this book begins with Herbrand semantics rather than the more traditional Tarskian semantics. This approach makes the material considerably easier for students to understand and leaves them with a deeper understanding of what logic is all about. In addition to this text, there are online exercises (with automated grading), online logic tools and applications, online videos of lectures, and an online forum for discussion.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781627056366 20170213
Book
106 pages ; 20 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
421 pages ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiii, 201 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Logic is a field studied mainly by researchers and students of philosophy, mathematics and computing. Inductive logic seeks to determine the extent to which the premisses of an argument entail its conclusion, aiming to provide a theory of how one should reason in the face of uncertainty. It has applications to decision making and artificial intelligence, as well as how scientists should reason when not in possession of the full facts. In this book, Jon Williamson embarks on a quest to find a general, reasonable, applicable inductive logic (GRAIL), all the while examining why pioneers such as Ludwig Wittgenstein and Rudolf Carnap did not entirely succeed in this task. Along the way he presents a general framework for the field, and reaches a new inductive logic, which builds upon recent developments in Bayesian epistemology (a theory about how strongly one should believe the various propositions that one can express). The book explores this logic in detail, discusses some key criticisms, and considers how it might be justified. Is this truly the GRAIL? Although the book presents new research, this material is well suited to being delivered as a series of lectures to students of philosophy, mathematics, or computing and doubles as an introduction to the field of inductive logic.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199666478 20170313
Green Library

16. Logic : the basics [2017]

Book
xxiii, 288 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
430 pages ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
134 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
750 pages ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 314 pages ; 24 cm
Sometimes our intentions and beliefs exhibit a structure that proves us to be irrational. The Normativity of Rationality is concerned with the question of whether we ought to avoid such irrationality. Benjamin Kiesewetter defends the normativity of rationality by presenting a new solution to the problems that arise from the common assumption that we ought to be rational. The argument touches upon many other topics in the theory of normativity, such as the form and the content of rational requirements, the preconditions of criticism, and the function of reasons in deliberation and advice. Drawing on an extensive and careful assessment of the problems discussed in the literature, Kiesewetter provides a detailed defence of a reason-response conception of rationality, a novel, evidence-relative account of reasons, and an explanation of structural irrationality in terms of these accounts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198754282 20171106
Green Library