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Book
xiv, 305 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
In Poetry, Pictures, and Popular Publishing eminent Rossetti scholar Lorraine Janzen Kooistra demonstrates the cultural centrality of a neglected artifact: the Victorian illustrated gift book. Turning a critical lens on "drawing-room books" as both material objects and historical events, Kooistra reveals how the gift book's visual/verbal form mediated "high" and popular art as well as book and periodical publication. A composite text produced by many makers, the poetic gift book was designed for domestic space and a female audience; its mode of publication marks a significant moment in the history of authorship, reading, and publishing. With rigorous attention to the gift book's aesthetic and ideological features, Kooistra analyzes the contributions of poets, artists, engravers, publishers, and readers and shows how its material form moved poetry into popular culture. Drawing on archival and periodical research, she offers new readings of Eliza Cook, Adelaide Procter, and Jean Ingelow and shows the transatlantic reach of their verses. Boldly re-situating Tennyson's works within the gift-book economy he dominated, Kooistra demonstrates how the conditions of corporate authorship shaped the production and reception of the laureate's verses at the peak of his popularity. Poetry, Pictures, and Popular Publishing changes the map of poetry's place - in all its senses - in Victorian everyday life and consumer culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780821419649 20160605
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xii, 221 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
In this innovative study of the relationship between popular print and popular attitudes toward the body, health, and disease in antebellum America, Thomas A. Horrocks focuses our attention on a publication long neglected by scholars - the almanac. Approaching his subject as both a historian of the book and a historian of medicine, Horrocks contends that the almanac, the most popular secular publication in America from the late eighteenth century to the first quarter of the nineteenth, both shaped and was shaped by early Americans' beliefs and practices pertaining to health and medicine.Analyzing the astrological, therapeutic, and regimen advice offered in American almanacs over two centuries, and comparing it with similar advice offered in other genres of popular print of the period, Horrocks effectively demonstrates that the almanac was a leading source of health information in America prior to the Civil War. He contends that the almanac was an integral component of a complicated, fragmented, semi-vernacular health literature of the period, and that the genre played a leading role in disseminating astrological health advice as well as shaping contemporary and future perceptions of astrology.In terms of therapeutic and regimen advice, Horrocks asserts that the almanac performed a complementary role, confirming and reinforcing traditional beliefs and practices. By analyzing the almanac as a cultural artifact that represents a time, a place, and a certain set of assumptions and beliefs, he demonstrates that the genre can provide a lens through which scholars may examine early American attitudes and practices concerning their health in particular and American popular culture in general.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781558496576 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
214 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
157 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
304 p. : ill. (some col., 1 folded) ; 15 cm.
Green Library
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Journal/Periodical
v. ; 16 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Journal/Periodical
v.
Special Collections