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Book
xxiv, 533 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.
"With an introduction and annotations by David A. Sutherland, this volume features key documents from the Papers of the Halifax Relief Commission (HRC), which was established in the wake of the 1917 Halifax Explosion. The HRC was a quasi-governmental authority endowed with sweeping authority to implement a long-term program of reconstruction and rehabilitation to improve the qualify of life for the people of Halifax and neighbouring Dartmouth. This volume focuses on the operations of the HRC's Rehabilitation Department through the formative period of 1918-1919, when pioneer social workers from major cities in both Canada and the United States were recruited to set up an administrative structure that could provide disaster victims with assistance. Decision-making about who was most deserving and what form relief should take became matters of controversy. A key feature of the case-file transcriptions that make up the bulk of this volume is the extent to which they give voice to the common people of Halifax as they struggled to rebuild. By bringing to light the documents left by the HRC, this volume will deepen the understanding of Haligonians whose lives were transformed by the unprecedented explosion."-- Provided by publisher.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
lxxi, 293 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
"Based on a study of the 6,700 editorials published in Le Devoir during the Henri Bourassa years (1910-32), this volume seeks to outline the ideological positions defended by Bourassa as French-Canadian nationalism was emerging for the first time in full force. During these two decades, Le Devoir was instrumental in defining the place of French speakers in Canada and in spelling out their aspirations as a separate people within the federation. The book is an anthology of sixty of the most significant editorials, translated into English, each situated in its historical context by the editor, historian Pierre Anctil. Examined together, the editorials offer a global picture of the evolution of French Canada at a crucial time in its history. They also paint a clear image of the tensions that emerged between Francophone and Anglophone Canada shortly after the signing of Confederation and at the turn of the twentieth century."-- Provided by publisher.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
lvi, 645 pages : illustrations, maps, color portrait ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xx, 517 pages ; 24 cm.
O.D. Skelton: The Work of the World, 1923-1941 is a lively and compelling trip through the letters, diary entries, and official memoranda of O.D. Skelton, one of the most important and influential civil servants in twentieth-century Canada. Skelton was a towering foreign policy advisor to Canada's prime ministers and a lonely advocate for the country's independence from Great Britain. His accounts detail his work as he co-operated and clashed with William Lyon Mackenzie King and R.B. Bennett over Canada's participation in the international arena. Norman Hillmer's selection and assessment of Skelton's writings offer a behind-the-scenes look at the inner workings of the federal government as Skelton systematically built up the Department of External Affairs and the Canadian diplomatic service as instruments of the national interest, confronted the Manchurian, Ethiopian, and Czech crises of the 1930s, aligned himself with senior francophone politicians such as Ernest Lapointe and Raoul Dandurand, and watched in despair as Europe and Asia descended into war. Providing avenues into a time when Canada was struggling to define itself, this collection shows the ways in which O.D. Skelton pushed the country onto the global stage.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780773542723 20160612
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
2 v. : maps ; 24 cm.
  • V. 1. The voyages : Voyages (1668)
  • I. To the Mohawk, 1652-53
  • II. To the Onondaga, 1657-58
  • III. To Lake Michigan, 1654-56
  • IV. To Lake Superior and James Bay, 1659-60
  • Appendix: Radisson in an Aboriginal World / Heidi Bohaker
  • V. 2. Port Nelson relations, miscellaneous writings, and related documents.
Pierre-Esprit Radisson (1636-1710) was many men. He was a teenager captured, tortured, and adopted by the Mohawk, and a youth relishing the freedom of the wilderness. He was the French-born servant of an ambitious English trading company and a hapless petitioner at the court of Louis XIV. He was a central figure in the tug-of-war between France and England over Hudson Bay and a pretender to aristocratic status who had to defend his actions before James II. Finally, he was a retired "sea captain" trying to provide for his children, and despite the pension he had fought for, the "decay'd Gentleman" described in his burial record. Radisson's writings, characterized by hubris and contradiction, provoke many questions. Was he a semi-literate woodsman? Are his accounts of Native life ethnographically reliable? Can he be trusted to tell the truth about himself? How important were his explorations? All these questions are raised in this first critical edition of Radisson's writings in both English and French, which includes previously unknown documents. Volume 1 follows Radisson's account of the decade he spent, in part with his brother-in-law Medard Des Groseilliers, exploring far into the interior of North America. In Volume 2, Radisson recounts his part in the battle over possession of Hudson Bay waged in the 1680s by England and France, his difficulties at the French and English courts, and his struggle with the Hudson's Bay Company for his just reward. Striking a superb balance between accessible writing and comprehensive scholarship, this new edition of Radisson's writing is indispensable, definitive, and reasserts the important roles that Radisson played in seventeenth-century North American rivalries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780773544376 20160610
Pierre-Esprit Radisson (1636?-1710) was many men. He was a teenager captured, tortured, and adopted by the Mohawk and he was a youth relishing the freedom of the wilderness. He was the French-born servant of an ambitious English trading company and a hapless petitioner at the court of Louis XIV. He was a central figure in the tug-of-war between France and England over Hudson Bay and a pretender to aristocratic status who had to defend his actions before James II. Finally, he was a retired "sea captain" trying to provide for his children, and despite the pension he had fought for, he was the "decay'd Gentleman" described in his burial record. Radisson's writings, characterized in parts by hubris and in others by contradiction, provoke many questions. Was he a semi-literate woodsman? Are his accounts of Native life ethnographically reliable? Can he be trusted to tell the truth about himself? How important were his explorations? All these questions are raised in this first critical edition of Radisson's writings in both English and French, which includes three previously unknown documents. While Pierre-Esprit Radisson remains a North American icon, the interpretation of his career presents a vexing historical problem: who in fact was this "mercurial genius?" Germaine Warkentin's richly annotated new edition of Radisson's writings brings us closer to an answer. Germaine Warkentin is professor emeritus of English, University of Toronto and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780773539754 20160615
Pierre-Esprit Radisson (1636?-1710) was many men. He was a teenager captured, tortured, and adopted by the Mohawk, and a youth relishing the freedom of the wilderness. He was the French-born servant of an ambitious English trading company and a hapless petitioner at the court of Louis XIV. He was a central figure in the tug-of-war between France and England over Hudson Bay and a pretender to aristocratic status who had to defend his actions before James II. Finally, he was a retired "sea captain" trying to provide for his children, and despite the pension he had fought for, the "decay'd Gentleman" described in his burial record. Radisson's writings, characterized by hubris and contradiction, provoke many questions. Was he a semi-literate woodsman? Are his accounts of Native life ethnographically reliable? Can he be trusted to tell the truth about himself? How important were his explorations? In this first volume of Radisson's complete writings, Germaine Warkentin introduces the life, travels, motivations, and work of this compelling and complicated figure while providing a comprehensive and authoritative edition of his masterpiece - The Voyages. In the four accounts of his travels to the far interior of the Great Lakes and James Bay, Radisson vibrantly depicts his life among the Mohawk, his encounters and relationships with Native peoples, Jesuits, English, French, and Dutch colonists and traders, as well as the hazards of the capricious politics of the New World and the thrilling surprise of discoveries. Striking a superb balance between accessible writing and comprehensive scholarship, this new edition of Radisson's Voyages is indispensable, definitive, and reasserts the important roles that Radisson played in seventeenth-century North American rivalries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780773540828 20160615
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
cxx, 390 p. : map, ports. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxii, 490 p., [9] p. of plates : ill., maps, facsims. ; 24 cm.
The French explorer, surveyor, cartographer, and diplomat Samuel de Champlain (c. 1575-1635) is often called the Father of New France for founding the settlement that became Quebec City, governing New France, and mapping much of the St. Lawrence and eastern Great Lakes region. Champlain was also a prolific writer who documented his experiences in the Americas, including his travels, impressions of the New World, and encounters and alliances with native peoples. Samuel de Champlain before 1604 is the definitive edition of the early documents by or about Champlain, correcting numerous errors contained in previous publications. Providing the documents in both English translation and the original French or Spanish, this meticulous, fastidiously researched work includes a comprehensive introduction that provides biographical information, details about Champlain's early career as aide to the quartermaster of Henri IV's army in Brittany and his connections at court, the military and political context underlying French imperialism, and the royal policies that allowed trade and colonization in the Americas. This stunning scholarly achievement will set the historical record straight and be an invaluable resource for decades to come.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780773537576 20160605
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 555 p., 12 p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
lxviii, 493 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxxiii, 453 p., [2] folded leaves of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
cxlvi, 305, viii p., [1] folded leaf of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xlviii, 487 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 24 cm.
1799 to 1825 letters between Elizabeth Frances Hale of Quebec City and her brother William, Lord Amherst, Governor General of India. The letters are stylish, witty, dramatic, and intimate. We learn much of the nature of Quebec society during the Napoleonic Wars and the rise of nationalistic fervour. The Society has published 100 titles since 1907 covering the major exploration and surveyors' journals. 25 titles are in print and available.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780968931714 20160527
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
15 p. ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
cxvii, 494 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 357 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
A political biography of Robert Rice Reynolds, US senator from North Carolina from 1933-1945. It seeks to rescue the eccentric Reynolds from his cartoon character reputation, explaining his political appeal and highlighting his genuine contributions without overlooking his flaws.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780807850640 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
cviii, 477, xx p., [5] leaves of plates (some folded) : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
lxxiv, 563, xx p., [6] leaves of plates (some folded) : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
lxxxi, 421, xxii p., [4] leaves of plates : ill., maps (2 folded), ports. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
lxxxix, 438, xxii p. : ill., maps, port. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xix, 317 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
Focusing on the town of Schwabisch Hall, the author explores the recovery of the region's urban communities after the Thirty Years' War. He argues that changing relations between town and country contributed to the weakening of craft production, and therefore, to the region's urban stagnation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780807850633 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)