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Book
352 pages ; 23 cm.
  • The addresses: National organisations
  • Shires
  • Royal burghs
  • Other burghs
  • Parishes
  • Presbyteries
  • Hamilton letters
  • 'A short account', Walter Stewart of Pardovan.
"In 1706-1707, a proposed union of the Scottish and English kingdoms excited vigorous debate. Dozens of Scottish burghs, shires and parishes sent petitions to the Scottish parliament, known as addresses, to protest against the treaty of union. The addresses reveal local opinions and feelings, as expressed through a sophisticated petitioning campaign. They show how Presbyterians and Jacobites joined in an oppositional coalition, which disagreed on most matters of church and state, but agreed to oppose the union. Thousands of male tenant farmers, artisans and servants subscribed with their own hands, or via notaries and church elders. Campaigners argued that these opinions mattered and that parliament should listen to the 'mind of the nation'. Though ultimately unsuccessful, the campaign had a strong impact on the shape of the union. This volume provides a transcript of each local voice from the original handwritten documents, explaining the circumstances in relation to the voting patterns of members of the Scottish Parliament. An introduction sets the addresses in their historical context" -- Provided by publisher's website.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxx, 150 pages ; 23 cm.
"Arthur Woodburn's autobiography provides an exceptionally rich insight into the development of labour politics in Scotland in the first half of the twentieth century, into the experience of coalition government during the Second World War and of reconstruction and the government of Scotland in its aftermath. Woodburn was prominent within the labour movement and the Labour Party, but unlike many of his contemporaries his autobiography was never published at the time. It records his Edinburgh childhood, his route to socialism, his imprisonment as a conscientious objector during the First World War, educational and journalistic activities as well as his official roles in the Labour Party and government during the 1930s and 40s. This volume provides a clear annotated modern edition of Woodburn's text, together with a full scholarly introduction explaining the historical significance of the autobiography and Woodburn himself" -- Provided by publisher's website.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

3. Exploring loyalty [2017]

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vi, 240 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
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vi, 360 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 448 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 369 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
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x, 317 pages ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 204 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxix, 438 pages ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
200 pages, [8] pages of plates : illustrations (8 color) ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
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lxxxv, 409 pages ; 23 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
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viii, 228 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
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vi, 376 pages : illustrations, portraits ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
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xxxvi, 497 pages ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
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xii, 294 pages ; 24 cm.
English summary: The authors of this anthology look at the background, program and influence of the radio station Radio Free Europe during the Cold War. Foreign radio stations played a major role during the Cold War. Radio Free Europe (RFE), which was founded in Munich in 1951, was for many people on the other side of the "iron curtain" one of the most important alternative sources of information available. Although it was crucial to the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and the subsequent democratization of Eastern Europe, its history has to date seen little research. The contributions in this volume illuminate the political background of RFE and analyze the journalistic practices as well as the contents and reception of its programs. German description: In den Auseinandersetzungen zwischen West und Ost im Kalten Krieg erlangten Rundfunksender eine neue Bedeutung: Anders als die traditionellen Printmedien konnten Radiowellen den Eisernen Vorhang durchdringen. Im Mai 1951 nahm das amerikanische Radio Free Europe (RFE) in Munchen seinen Sendebetrieb auf. Es beschaftigte Emigranten, die mit ihren Sendungen fur ihre Heimatlander eine alternative Berichterstattung uber die politische und gesellschaftliche Lage im Land sowie uber die westliche Kultur bereitstellten. Wahrend die sozialistischen Staaten versuchten den Empfang von RFE zu verhindern, war der Sender fur viele Menschen in der Tschechoslowakei, Polen, Ungarn, Rumanien und Bulgarien uber Jahrzehnte eine der wenigen alternativen Informationsquellen. Obwohl RFE damit grosse Bedeutung fur die (Wieder-)Etablierung der Demokratie im ostlichen Europa zukommt, ist die Geschichte des Senders bislang kaum erforscht.Die Beitrage des vorliegenden Bandes nahern sich dem Thema aus unterschiedlichen Perspektiven. Sie beleuchten die politischen Hintergrunde und analysieren die sich wandelnde journalistische Praxis, Programminhalte sowie die Rezeption der Sendungen. Der Band stellt damit den aktuellen Forschungsstand zum Thema dar. Er umfasst Beitrage etablierter Wissenschaftler und jungerer Forscher aus Europa und den USA, Erinnerungen von Zeitzeugen runden den Band ab.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783525373101 20160619
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
304 pages, [20] pages of plates : ill. (some color) ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
980 pages, 7 pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
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x, 676 pages ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
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viii, 689 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
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xl, 628 p. : ill., map, facsim. ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)