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Book
517 pages : 17 illustrations (chiefly color) ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
429 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
cxvii, 454 pages : facsimiles ; 23 cm.
"This volume contains a collection of new editions of all the known fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Middle English technical recipes for painters, strainers, scribes, illuminators, and dyers, written c. 1300-1500. Most are previously unpublished and many are previously unknown. The collection contains 125 sets of recipes (around 1500 individual recipes), taken from 95 manuscripts, and forms the largest published corpus of such recipes in any language. These anonymous craft recipes describe the preparation of materials, outline their uses, advise on decorative effects, and confide tricks of the trade. In addition to recipes for conventional painting and illuminating are a number for 'staining' (figurative painting on cloth) which provide the only practical information on this once widely-practised, but now lost, English medium. The editor also identifies for the first time the earliest surviving recipes for block printing on textiles. The recipes are professional in origin, but were subsequently taken over by amateurs and encyclopaedists. Household recipes for colouring wax, fishing lines, hair, and food complete the collection. Most of the texts were originally composed in English; few are translated from pre-existing material. They are a valuable record of Middle English technical vocabulary, much of it previously unrecorded."-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
xiv, 264 pages ; 23 cm.
This volume contains eleven Scottish examples of particular kinds of humorous writing - comic, parodic, and satiric - of the late fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Previously unavailable in modern scholarly editions, these works are freshly established from diverse sources, including the manuscript that is the earliest extant of John Knox's "Historie of the Reformatioun of Religioun". A manuscript owned by the Campbell of Glenorchy family is the source of the volume's most substantial work, Duncane Laideus Testament; the poem's bicultural outlook provides an important reference point for historians, as well as scholars of early Scottish and Gaelic literature. Other texts include David Lyndsay's The Complaint of Bagsche and the anonymous "My gudame wes a gay wif". To assist study of the development of early Scottish writing, and to chart historical, especially religious, change, the poems are arranged in their probable order of composition. Each is introduced separately, with consideration of witnesses; evidence for date of composition and authorship; title, metre, and genre; and full apparatus. Explanatory notes examine matters of interest or potential difficulty, including the sense of contemporary expressions, wordplay, legal and Latin terms, and debts to earlier writers.The volume also includes a full Bibliography, Glossary, and Index of Names and Places. Dr Janet Hadley Williams is Honorary Visiting Fellow, School of Literature, Languages, and Linguistics, College of Arts and Social Sciences, The Australian National University.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781897976388 20161219
Green Library
Book
liv, 252 pages, [1] leaf of plates : facsimiles ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction. 1. Mirror to Devout People
  • 2. Manuscripts and early provenance
  • 3. The relationship of Gg and ND
  • 4. Language of the texts
  • 5. Sources
  • a. Meditaciones vitae Christi
  • b. The Vulgate Bible and biblical commentaries
  • c. Approved women
  • d. Othyr doctorys
  • 6. Editorial method
  • A Mirror to Devout People.
This edition of A Mirror to Devout People presents for the first time a Middle English Life of Christ, with additional religious advice, written in the early fifteenth century by a Carthusian monk at the Sheen Charterhouse for a sister at the nearby Bridgettine Syon Abbey. Both the Sheen Charterhouse and Syon were recent royal foundations, established by Henry V. The Mirror is an important example of the devotional works produced to satisfy demand among laity as well as professed religious, wanting to read lives of Christ in the years following the repressive legislation of Archbishop Arundel (1409), which placed severe restrictions on biblical translation into English, intended to limit the spread of heresy. The Mirror, written in the tradition of the highly successful translation by another Carthusian, Nicholas Love, of Pseudo-Bonaventure's life of Christ, testifies to the demand for such material in pious households.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198744979 20170227
Green Library
Book
430 pages ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 413 pages : illustration (black and white) ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
ix, 530 pages ; 23 cm.
The Maitland Quarto Manuscript was compiled in c.1586 in the circle of the Maitland Family of Lethington, East Lothian. It is a highly significant and rich collection of Older Scots poetry. It contains the most complete collection of the poems of Sir Richard Maitland, judge, privy counsellor, and Keeper of the Great Seal of Scotland under Mary Queen of Scots, together with poems attributed to Maitland's heir, John Maitland of Thirlestane, Chancellor to James VI, and to leading writers and intellectuals, including the king himself, Alexander Montgomerie, and Alexander Arbuthnot. It attests to new developments in Scottish literature in the late sixteenth century by including many unique examples of Calvinist lyric, the earliest known British Country House poem, and Sapphic verse, as well as poems influenced by Italian and French sources. It also provides evidence for the role of women in the composition, collection and copying of Older Scots verse. This critical edition offers fresh access to the fascinating contents of this important manuscript. It provides an authoritative text, with full modern annotation and glossary. Its introduction and notes address the textual transmission of the poems, and offer detailed contextualization of them in both historical and literary terms. Joanna Martin is Lecturer in Middle English at the University of Nottingham.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781897976401 20160618
Green Library
Book
lxiv, 173 pages : illustration, facsimile, map ; 23 cm.
  • INTRODUCTION -- 1. Manuscript -- 2. Language and Dialect -- 3. Historical Context -- 4. The Franciscans in Ireland -- 5. Literary Context -- 6. Previous Editions -- 7. Treatment of the Text -- THE TEXTS OF BL MS HARLEY 913 -- COMMENTARIES ON EDITED TEXTS -- APPENDIX: TEXTS FROM BL MS LANSDOWNE 418 -- GLOSSARIES.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198739166 20160619
British Library MS Harley 913 is known as the 'Kildare Manuscript' from the authorship of one of the poems by the Franciscan, Friar Michael of Kildare. The collection was written in the 1330s, in Ireland, perhaps in Waterford. It is chiefly known for two poems in particular, often anthologised, but now presented in their literary and cultural context: 'The Land of Cockaygne, ' a fantasy of a culinary and sexual earthly paradise, and 'Lollai, lollai, litel child', a lullaby warning the baby of what is to come in later life. The manuscript contains 17 English poems, 12 of which were probably composed in Ireland, three Anglo-Norman poems, and many Latin items in prose and verse, including Goliardic satire, preaching materials, and matters concerning the Franciscans and their history. The English poems include a description of the humiliations of old age, a satire on the inhabitants of an unnamed Irish town, a celebration of the massacre of native Irish, a complaint about the corruption of those in power, reflections on Christ's passion and guides to basic Christian doctrine. A French poem gives a detailed account of the building of defences around New Ross. Apart from their literary and historical interest, the English material is important linguistically, as the chief and earliest evidence for the English language in Ireland. The English and Anglo-Norman poems are edited complete, with detailed headnotes, annotations and glossary, while full accounts are given of the Latin texts. An appendix describes the contents of British Library MS Lansdowne 418, a seventeenth-century copy of 11 of the texts in Harley 913, including 5 now lost from there.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198739166 20160619
Green Library
Book
261 pages ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
512 pages ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiv, 212 pages : genealogical table ; 23 cm.
The Buke of the Howlat was composed in the late 1440s for Elizabeth Douglas, wife of Archibald Douglas, earl of Moray. It is one of the great monuments of fifteenth-century Scots verse, perhaps the finest example of Older Scots alliterative poetry, telling a comic fable of an owl's borrowed feathers, his pride and ultimate fall, and a bird parliament which decides his fate. At its centre is a heraldic excurses which leads to a celebration of the virtues of the Douglas family and their service to Robert Bruce in the Scottish Wars of Independence. Its themes therefore focus on Scottish freedom, aristocratic achievement, and good self- and political governance; its influences are drawn from chanson d'aventure, beast fable and complaint, and embrace the French, Scots, Gaelic and English Chaucerian and northern literary traditions, making it of great significance to anyone interested in the late medieval literature of the British Isles. This critical edition provides a new text, with full modern annotation and glossary. Its introduction and notes address the textual transmission of the poem in detail, its traditional alliterative form, the poetic tula, its language, heraldic elements, and historical references and contexts. Ralph Hanna is Emeritus Professor of Palaeography, University of Oxford.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781897976395 20160616
Green Library
Book
xviii, 231 pages : ill., maps (some color) ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
lxxxix, 361 pages : illustration ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Life and career of Alexander Barclay
  • Sallust, his Opera, and their reception in the Middle Ages and Renaissance
  • Selected list of Sallust editions to 1521
  • Barclay's sources and his use of commentaries
  • Translation method and style
  • The texts of the translation
  • Plan of the present edition
  • The famous Cronycle of the warre which the Romayns had agaynst Iugurth, usurper of the Kyngdome of Numidy
  • Preface to Thomas Paynell's Edition of 1557
  • Soldus's summary of the Bellum Iugurthunum, as reproduced by Ascensius
  • Selected passages for the commentaries of Soldus and Ascensius.
Green Library
Book
654 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
350 pages ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
221 pages : illustrations (black and white, colour) ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
294 pages ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
311 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
384 pages : illustrations, portrait ; 25 cm.
  • Narratives of nature in English and Swedish : butterfly books and the case of Argynnis paphia / Annelie Ädel & John Swales
  • Telling it like it is or strategic writing? : a portrait of the economist writer / Trine Dahl
  • Move analysis of abstracts from a diachronic perspective : a case study / Paul Gillaerts
  • Investigating the generic structure of mediation processes / Maurizio Gotti
  • Orrmulum : genre membership and text organisation / Nils-Lennart Johannesson
  • Vocabulary in advanced L2 English speech / Britt Erman & Margareta Lewis
  • Peer assessment of spoken lingua franca English in tertiary education in Sweden : criterion-referenced versus norm-referenced assessment / Beyza Björkman
  • Master level writing in engineering and productive vocabulary : what does measuring academic vocabulary levels tell us? / Magnus Gustafsson & Hans Malmström
  • Philip Shaw's writing expertise in academic discourse / Akiko Okamura
  • Additional reasons for the correlation of voice, tense and sentence function / Diane Pecorari
  • Tourism and the commodification of language / Joan C. Beal
  • "Ridiculously country" : the representation of Appalachian English in the Deliverance screenplay / Peter Sundkvist
  • "I don't sound like a Geordie!" : phonological and morphosyntactic aspects of Carlisle English / Sandra Jansen
  • World Englishes, globalisation, and language worlds / Kingsley Bolton
  • The north wind and the sun : a classic text as data for world Englishes / Gunnel Melchers
  • Of birds and the human species : communication in migration contexts : English in the Cameroonian migrant community in the Ruhr area / Christiane Meierkord & Bridget Fonkeu
  • The emergence of a standardizing Cameroon Francophone English pronunciation in Cameroon / Augustin Simo Bobda
  • Tolkien and Lewis on language in their scholarly work / Maria Kuteeva
  • Goddamn : from curse to byname / Magnus Ljung
  • The pragmatic markers look and listen in a cross-linguistic perspective / Karin Aijmer & Anna Elgemark
  • Opposites attract / Christina Alm-Arvius
  • Non-correlative commas between subjects and verbs in nineteenth-century newspaper English / Erik Smitterberg.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)