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Book
xi, 376 pages : illustration ; 26 cm.
  • Material And methods: Background information ; Sources of documentation;- Taxonomic clarification of hosts and parasites ; Use of the database ; Interpreting crocodilian-parasite database
  • Crocodilian-parasite database: Family Alligatoridae: Alligator mississippiensis ; Alligator sinensis ; Caiman crocodilus apaporiensis ; Caiman crocodilus chiapsius ; Caiman crocodilus crocodilus ; Caiman crocodilus fuscus ; Caiman latirostris ; Caiman yacare ; Melanosuchus niger ; Paleosuchus palpebrosus ; Paleosuchus trigonatus ; Family Crocodylidae: Crocodylus acutus ; Crocodylus intermedius ; Crocodylus johnstoni ; Crocodylus mindorensis ; Crocodylus moreletii ; Crocodylus niloticus ; Crocodylus novaeguineae ; Crocodylus palustris ; Crocodylus porosus ; Crocodylus rhombifer ; Crocodylus siamensis ; Mecistops cataphractus ; Osteolaemus tetraspis ; Osteolaemus tetraspis osborni ; Osteolaemus tetraspis tetraspis ; Tomistoma schlegelii ; Family Gavialidae: Gavialis gangeticus ; Unknown Crocodilian Species
  • Parasite-Crocodilian Database: Proteobacteria ; Sacromastigophora ; Heterokontophyta ; Apicomplexa ; Myxozoa ; Platyhelminthes ; Rotifera ; Acanthocephala ; Annelida ; Nematoda ; Arthropoda
  • Host specificity
  • Conclusion.
Records of parasitism in crocodilians date back to the early 1800s, distributed among various types of published and unpublished materials. Analyzing parasite-host specificity, geographic distribution, and taxonomy can provide otherwise cryptic details about crocodilian ecology and evolution, as well as their local food web dynamics. This information is critical for improved conservation tactics for both crocodilians and their habitat. As climate change, anthropogenic conflict, and environmental pollution endanger crocodilian ecosystems, there is a need for organized information on crocodile, alligator, caiman, and gharial infectious diseases. This volume meets this need by delivering the first checklist of crocodilians and their parasites for researchers and scholars in biology, herpetology, and ecology in order to further the knowledge and study of crocodilian-parasite dynamics and improve our understanding of human impacts on ecosystems.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520098893 20160612
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Journal/Periodical
volumes : illustrations ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage), Science Library (Li and Ma)

3. The ants of Fiji [2012]

Book
xiii, 384 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.
The ant fauna of the Fijian archipelago is a diverse assemblage of endemic radiations, pan-Pacific species, and exotics introduced from around the world. "The Ants of Fiji" describes the entire Fijian ant fauna, and includes the results of a recently completed archipelago-wide biodiversity inventory. A total of 187 ant species representing 43 genera are recognized here with an illustrated key to genera, synopses of each species, keys to species of all genera, and a species list. The work is heavily illustrated with specimen images, distribution maps, and habitat elevation charts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520098886 20160615
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 164 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

5. Entomologica americana [2009 - ]

Journal/Periodical
v. : ill., ports.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 94 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
The modified mouthparts group is perhaps the largest of the four major Hawaiian Drosophila clades, yet has received relatively little taxonomic attention during the past 40 years. This study reviews unplaced species and the ceratostoma, freycinetiae, semifuscata, and setiger subgroups, with descriptions of 22 new species. We hope this work encourages greater study of the biology of this important group.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520098732 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 124 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
An annotated catalog of type material of the genus Aphytis Howard (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) in the collection of the Entomology Research Museum, University of California, Riverside, California, USA (UCRC) provides information on 75 valid species. Curation of the UCRC Aphytis slide collection involved remounting 7,390 specimens from Hoyer's medium into Canada balsam (a single specimen per each slide). This included 7,292 specimens that were remounted, labeled, and databased and 98 specimens that were remounted and labeled but not databased (the types of the South African species received on loan from the South African National Collection of Insects, Plant Protection Research Institute, Pretoria, South Africa). Among these are 309 primary type specimens (i.e., holotypes, syntypes, lectotypes, and neotypes) belonging to 51 nominal species, 2,473 secondary type specimens (i.e., paratypes, allotypes, and paralectotypes) of various nominal species, and 4,608 nontype specimens of many species of Aphytis from more than 50 different countries. Numerous nomenclatural and other mistakes (such as improper or coded labeling) in the treatment of the type specimens of the Aphytis species are corrected; several primary types are returned to the appropriate depositories, and many remounted secondary types are donated to other major taxonomic collections of Aphelinidae. Lectotypes are designated for A. africanus Quednau, A. coheni DeBach, A. cylindratus Compere, A. equatorialis Rosen and DeBach, A. fisheri DeBach, A. holoxanthus DeBach, A. immaculatus Compere, A. lepidosaphes Compere, A. lingnanensis Compere, A. melinus DeBach and A. taylori Quednau.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 412 p. : ill., map ; 26 cm.
The purpose of this volume is to encourage and facilitate focused research and provide a forum for scholarly exchange about the status of Mayfly and Stonefly science. Professor John Brittain, whose research is focused on freshwater entomology, especially egg development and life cycle strategies of Ephemeroptera and Plecoptera, presents a chapter reflecting on the quality of mayflies as good indicators of global warming and the quality of streams and lakes.Professor Emeritus Andrew Sheldon, whose interests have encompassed community and population ecology of aquatic animals over a span of more than 40 years, especially insects and fishes, explores topics of Scale and Hierarchy and the Ecology of Plecoptera, discussing how studies emphasizing scale and perspective reveal importance of stoneflies to ecosystems. Other topics cover a broad base of disciplines including morphology, physiology, phylogeny, taxonomy, ecology and conservation. The chapters have been compiled into three sections for this volume: Ecology, Zoogeography and Systematics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520098688 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 332 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.
The subfamily Rileyinae (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae) is redefined to contain 6 genera and 69 species for which keys are provided. Two morphological data sets, analyzed via maximum parsimony with PAUP, yield hypotheses on the placement of Rileyinae within Eurytomidae and internal relationships of Rileyinae. Tables detailing host utilization for Eurytomidae (genera), Rileyinae (species), and confirmed/suspected plant associations for Rileyinae are included.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520098503 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xx, 411 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.
Details the evolutionary history of the desert woodrat complex (lepida group, genus Neotoma) of western North America. The analysis include standard multivariate morphometrics of museum specimens coupled with mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences and microsatellite loci. The work also traces the spatial and temporal diversification of this group of desert dwelling rodents, revising species boundaries and delineating subspecies considered valid.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520098664 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 981 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.
Oliver P. Pearson's studies on mammalian biology remain standard reading for ecologists, physiologists, taxonomists, and biogeographers. Reflecting this, the papers gathered here continue to expand our understanding of the ecology and evolution of subterranean mammals, and of ecology, taxonomy, and biogeography of Neotropical mammals, a group that was central to the latter half of Pearson's career.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520098596 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vii, 151 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
The Neotropical ant genus Linepithema is revised at the species level for the first time. Following extensive synonymy, nineteen species are recognized, including six new species. Taxonomic keys, diagnoses, illustrations, and discussions of the biology, distribution, natural history, and taxonomy are provided.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520098589 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
311 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.
California has one of the world's most diverse chrysidid wasp faunas. These are large, brightly metallic-colored parasitoids of sphecoid wasps and bees. This study reviews the species and genera of Chrysididae in California, maps their overall distributions, and gives keys to California genera and species. In addition, three species described by Linsenmaier in 1994 are synonymized.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520098572 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Journal/Periodical
v. : ill. ; 26 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Journal/Periodical
v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Journal/Periodical
v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 383 p. : ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 26 cm.
This volume uses many data sources to illuminate patterns of mammal evolution, including cutting edge analyses. Leading mammalogists are contributors. It combines a series of rigorous, original research papers with more informal recollections of James L. Patton, who served as Curator of Mammals in the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, and as Professor of Integrative Biology at the University of California, Berkeley, from 1969 until 2001. As a curator and a member of the Berkeley faculty, Patton made an indelible mark on vertebrate evolutionary biology. In addition to significantly advancing studies of mammalian evolutionary genetics, systematics, and phylogeography, he was instrumental in shaping the careers of vertebrate biologists throughout the Americas. This book brings to life both the distinguished career and the distinctive personality of this highly respected evolutionary biologist.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520098534 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 158 p., [40] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 266 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 119 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
The Museum of Vertebrate Zoology (MVZ), located on the campus of the University of California, Berkeley, is a leading center of herpetological research in the United States. This monograph offers a brief account of the principal figures associated with the collection and of the most important events in the history of herpetology in the MVZ during its first 93 years, and lists all type specimens of recent amphibians and nonavian reptiles in the collection. Although the MVZ has existed since 1908, until 1945 there was no formal curator for the collection of amphibians and nonavian reptiles. Since that time Robert C. Stebbins, David B. Wake, Harry W. Greene, JavierEA. Rodriguez-Robles (inEan interim capacity), and Craig Moritz have served in that position. The herpetological collection of the MVZ was begun on March 13, 1909, with a collection of approximately 430 specimens from southern California and as of December 31, 2001, contained 232,254 specimens. Taxonomically, the collection is strongest in salamanders, accounting for 99,176 specimens, followed by 'lizards' (squamate reptiles other than snakes and amphisbaenians, 63,439), frogs (40,563), snakes (24,937), turtles (2,643), caecilians (979), amphisbaenians (451), crocodilians (63), and tuataras (3). Whereas the collection's emphasis historically has been on the western United States and on California in particular, representatives of taxa from many other parts of the world are present. The 1,765 type specimens in the MVZ comprise 120 holotypes, three neotypes, three syntypes, and 1,639 paratopotypes and paratypes; 83 of the holotypes were originally described as full species. Of the 196 amphibian and nonavian reptilian taxa represented by type material, most were collected in Mexico (63) and California (USA, 54). The Appendix of the monograph presents a list of curators, graduate and undergraduate students, postdoctoral fellows, research associates, research assistants, curatorial associates, curatorial assistants, and visiting faculty who have conducted research on the biology of amphibians and reptiles while in residence in the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology as of December 31, 2001.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520238183 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)