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Book
1 online resource (61 pages) Digital: text file; PDF.
Collection
Non-governmental Organizations (NGOs) Collection
This report analyzes emails from the accounts of deceased RAND Corporation researcher and apparent CIA (Central Intelligence Agency) contractor Mr. Scott Gerwehr. Based on analysis of the Gerwehr emails and reference to related open source documents, the authors note five key findings related to the APA: 1. The APA secretly coordinated with officials from the CIA, White House, and the Department of Defense to create an APA ethics policy on national security interrogations that comported with thenclassified legal guidance authorizing the CIA torture program. A US government research scientist, who had recently served as President Bush's behavioral science advisor, is reported to have secretly drafted "language related to research" inserted by APA officials into the 2005 APA ethics policy on interrogations. The APA had numerous contacts with CIA contract psychologists Drs. James Mitchell and Bruce Jessen starting in at least 2003, including contacts related to interrogation techniques; at least one senior APA official was informed of their clandestine role at the CIA related to interrogations; yet APA has consistently denied such contacts. APA did not disclose Dr. James Mitchell's past APA membership when it released its 2007 statement in response to journalists' revelations regarding Mitchell's role in abusive interrogations. Despite substantial contact between the APA, the White House and CIA officials, including the over 600 emails noted in this report, there is no evidence that any APA official expressed concern over mounting reports of psychologist involvement in detainee abuse during four years of direct email communications with senior members of the US intelligence community. The APA's complicity in the CIA torture program, by allowing psychologists to administer and calibrate permitted harm, undermines the fundamental ethical standards of the profession. If not carefully understood and rejected by the profession, this may portend a fundamental shift in the profession's relationship with the people it serves.