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Book
viii, 316 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 x 28 cm
Collection
General Collection for SUL Acquisitions
  • Introduction
  • Presenting the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Orchestra
  • Mel Lewis and the Jazz Orchestra
  • The Vanguard Jazz Orchestra: sixteen as one
  • Thad
  • Mel
  • The music of Bob Brookmeyer
  • The music of Jim McNeely
  • Riding the bus: life on the road
  • Solo space: the small group within a big band
  • A legacy of composition
  • The 50th anniversary collection
  • The Village Vanguard
  • Just like on the records: the official discography
  • And the band
  • By the numbers.
Music Library
Book
1 online resource.
Biofilms are multicellular communities consisting of microorganisms enmeshed in an extracellular matrix of biopolymers. The matrix provides the community structure and cohesiveness and allows it to adhere to a variety of interfaces. Formation of a biofilm is advantageous to the microbial community, as it provides protection from external assaults (desiccation, oxidizing agents, predation), protection from host immune defenses, facilitates close cell-to-cell interactions for DNA exchange, and creates nutrient gradients that give rise to metabolic diversity within the community. These factors allow biofilms to persist in a variety of settings, ranging from large-scale industrial equipment to medical implants in the human host. In fact, many infections are now appreciated to be biofilm-related and are difficult to treat by traditional means such as antibiotics. To combat unwanted biofilms, a current strategy is to take a biophysical approach and interfere with the biofilm structure by disrupting the extracellular matrix. This strategy could revoke the survival advantages provided to the microorganisms by existing in the biofilm community. It also avoids the life-or-death pressure placed on microorganisms by traditional antibiotic treatment that gives rise to drug resistant mutations. However, to achieve this goal of targeting the extracellular matrix, we require an improved understanding of the underlying mechanical properties of the biofilm structure. In this work, we describe the use of modified rheological methods to quantify mechanical interactions relevant at all stages of the biofilm lifecycle, including: initial microbial adhesion to interfaces, maturation of the biofilm structure, and microbial dispersal. A Live Cell Monolayer Rheometer (LCMR) was used to study adhesion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to bladder epithelial cells, the initial step in bladder infection. Quantitative mechanical measurements defined the contributions of bacterially produced type 1 pili, curli, and cellulose to bladder cell adhesion, and revealed an important role for cellulose in mediating these interactions. This novel use of live cell rheology can be expanded to study a variety of other relevant host-pathogen interactions. In a separate study, interfacial shear rheology was used to study the maturation of biofilms formed at the air-liquid interface by Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera. It was discovered that out of several known extracellular matrix components in the V. cholerae biofilm, a specific matrix protein called Bap1 contributed significantly to maintenance of biofilm elasticity, biofilm hydrophobicity, and development of a mature biofilm structure. Finally, mechanical measurements relevant to biofilm dispersal were performed using a custom-built device to apply large deformations to Bacillus subtilis biofilms formed at the air-liquid interface. These measurements revealed that biofilms exhibit non-uniform deformation due to inhomogeneous mechanical properties within the structure and can have both viscoelastic and viscoplastic characteristics. Together, these studies produced new tools in the field of biofilm mechanics and provided quantitative measurements of mechanical interactions relevant to all stages of the biofilm lifecycle.
Book
1 online resource.
In this work, we introduce and apply several new techniques for oil/gas reservoir optimization under uncertainty. As the first contribution, we develop a general methodology for optimal closed-loop field development (CLFD) under geological uncertainty. CLFD involves three major steps: optimizing the field development plan based on current geological knowledge, drilling new wells and collecting hard (well) data and production data, and updating multiple geological models based on all of the available data. In the optimization step, the number, type, locations and controls for new wells (and future controls for existing wells) are optimized using a hybrid Particle Swarm Optimization -- Mesh Adaptive Direct Search algorithm. The objective in the examples presented is to maximize expected (over multiple realizations) net present value (NPV) of the overall project. History matching is accomplished using an adjoint-gradient-based randomized maximum likelihood (RML) procedure. Different treatments are presented for history matching Gaussian and channelized models. Because the CLFD history matching component is fast relative to the optimization component, we generate a relatively large number of history matched models. Optimization is then performed using a representative subset of these realizations. We introduce a systematic optimization with sample validation (OSV) procedure, in which the number of realizations used for optimization is increased if a validation criterion is not satisfied. The CLFD methodology is applied to two- and three-dimensional example cases. Results show that the use of CLFD increases the NPV for the `true' (synthetic) model by 10% --70% relative to that achieved by optimizing over a large number of prior realizations. The CLFD framework includes several components, and different approaches for history matching, optimization, model selection and economic evaluation can be applied. In our second contribution, we address the problem of selecting a subset of representative geological realizations from a large set. Towards this goal, we introduce a general framework, based on clustering, for selecting a representative subset of realizations for use in simulations involving `new' sets of decision parameters. Prior to clustering, each realization is represented by a low-dimensional feature vector that contains a combination of permeability-based and flow-based quantities. Calculation of flow-based features requires the specification of a (base) flow problem and simulation over the full set of realizations. Permeability information is captured concisely through use of principal component analysis. By computing the difference between the flow response for the subset and the full set, we quantify the performance of various realization-selection methods. The impact of different weightings for flow and permeability information in the cluster-based selection procedure is assessed for a range of examples involving different types of decision parameters. These decision parameters are generated either randomly, in a manner that is consistent with the solutions proposed in global stochastic optimization procedures such as GA and PSO, or through perturbation around a base case, consistent with the solutions considered in pattern search optimization. We find that flow-based clustering is preferable for problems involving new well settings (e.g., time-varying well bottom-hole pressures) or small changes in well configuration, while both permeability-based and flow-based clustering provide similar results for (new) random multiwell configurations. We also investigate the use of efficient tracer-type simulations for obtaining flow-based features, and demonstrate that this treatment performs nearly as well as full-physics simulations for the cases considered. The various procedures are applied to select realizations for use in production optimization under uncertainty, which greatly accelerates the optimization computations. Optimization performance is shown to be consistent with the realization-selection results for cases involving new decision parameters. In the third contribution, we introduce a methodology for the joint optimization of economic project life and well controls. We present a nested formulation for this joint optimization problem where we maximize NPV, subject to the constraint that the rate of return of operations is greater than the minimum attractive rate of return (MARR) or hurdle rate. The methodology provides the optimal project life and the optimal well controls such that the maximum NPV is obtained at the end of the project life, and the rate of return of the project is essentially equal to MARR. Application of this procedure, enables avoiding situations where NPV increases slowly in time, but the benefit relative to the capital employed is extremely low. We demonstrate the successful application of this treatment for production optimization for two- and three-dimensional reservoir models.
Book
1 online resource.
The reentry blackout phenomenon affects most spacecraft entering a dense planetary atmosphere from space, due to a plasma layer that surrounds the spacecraft. This plasma layer is created by the ionization of ambient air due to shock and frictional heating created by the moving reentry vehicle, and, in some cases is further enhanced due to contamination by ablation products. The highly mobile electrons in the plasma cause a strong attenuation of incoming and outgoing electromagnetic waves, including those used for command and control, communication, and telemetry over a period referred to as the ``blackout period''. The blackout period may last up to several minutes, and at reentry speeds that may be of the order of 10 km/s, poses a serious safety hazard for the payload on board the spacecraft, especially for human spaceflight. In this work, we present a method for alleviation of reentry blackout using electric fields in a pulsed fashion. We study the reentry plasma's interaction with electronegative voltage pulses using computer simulations that incorporate models of the plasma's response to the applied electric field and interactions between the plasma sheath and the spacecraft surface. The simulations show how one can create pockets of depleted electron density in the reentry plasma sheath that may be used as ``communication windows'', thereby circumventing reentry blackout. Several parametric sweeps are also performed in order to design a blackout alleviation system. Finally, we present a discussion of experimental efforts to verify the simulation results and conclude with a conceptual design for a reentry communications blackout alleviation system based on the exclusive use of electric fields.
Book
1 online resource.
Cellular state is an old concept. However, scientists have only recently begun the systematic manipulation of cells to characterize and understand the functions of myriad states. As biotechnology advances enable innovative and large-scale measurements on cellular components, new biostatistical tools are required to make sense of the increased data size and complexity, which in turn augment our knowledge of cellular states. In this dissertation, I discuss my contributions to the study of cellular states from the theory and computation angles: 1) modeling and inference of regulatory gene networks with systems of nonlinear deterministic and stochastic differential equations; 2) partition-assisted clustering analysis of high-dimensional single-cell mass cytometry data; and 3) the alignment of subpopulations of cells across cytometry samples by similarity in the associated network structures. These contributions cement a platform that furthers the discussion of cellular states by framing it in both mechanistic and quantitative terms. This platform adds layers of biostatistical knowledge to Biosciences and enhances the discovery of cellular state properties.
Book
1 online resource.
Proteins must achieve their native conformations in order to function and avoid aberrant interactions within the cell. The folded state is formed rapidly for proteins with simple topologies. However, the folding of many large proteins with complex folds is assisted by the diverse array of molecular chaperones. The chaperonins are a unique class of essential protein chaperones found in all domains of life. These complexes are comprised of two 7-9 membered rings that undergo dramatic conforma- tional changes upon ATP binding and hydrolysis. Two classes of chaperonins exist, termed group I and group II. Group I chaperonins exist in bacteria and endosymbiotic organelles, while group II chaperonins are found in all eukaryotes and archaea. Both families promote the folding of substrates in an ATP dependent manner by encapsulating them within discrete central chambers. This thesis focuses on detailing the mechanism of a model group II chaperonin from the archaea Methanococcus maripaludis. Work was performed to define the native folding substrates of the complex as well as to detail the cooperative mechanism that controls all group II chaperonin cycling. A key allosteric interface was identified using a mathematical approach that predicts functionally important residues based on patterns of covariation found in multiple sequence alignments of a protein. Biochemical dissection of mutations at this interface reveal that the chaperonins have evolved to be less cooperative than attainable. Early evidence will be presented that suggests the N- and C-terminal tails of the chaperonin likely serve as coordinators of nucleotide cycling.
Book
1 online resource.
Three dimensional complex chip architectures are gaining more widespread usage as computing devices continue to shrink. These complex architectures are necessary in order to continue scaling down the size of each individual transistor and make them more efficient. In manufacturing such complex architectures, traditional material deposition methods such as physical or chemical vapor deposition are no longer as effective as they are somewhat directional. A method that is gaining widespread use is atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD allows multiple advantages such as exquisite thickness control of deposited films, three dimensional film conformality and control over composition. However, certain useful films grown via ALD have an initial growth nucleation stage which is not well understood. This limitation prevents us from growing the thinnest possible pinhole-free films. Gaining an understanding of the nucleation stage would allow us to continue scaling our devices down further and even perform selective area deposition. In order to shed some light on the nucleation stage, in this dissertation, we have utilized the unique capability of a custom built combined scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and ALD system to observe topographically the nucleation stage of ALD in-situ. We used existing wet etch techniques to create atomically flat hydrogen terminated silicon, and created a method for using remote plasma to create atomically flat suboxide terminated silicon, both for use as suitable flat substrates for STM observation of ALD nucleation. With these atomically flat substrates available to us, we observed, using a variety of characterization techniques, the nucleation stage of two ALD systems: ALD ZnO and ALD Ru. Though we selected two specific systems to study, this technique could be further used on any other desired chemistries for study. We further demonstrate the ability of this STM-ALD tool to perform both bottom up and top down lithography, by activating sites for ALD, or decomposing ALD precursors at specific locations, or by etching away deposited layers using the STM tip.
Book
1 online resource.
Understanding the kinetics of shock-compressed SiO2 is of great importance for mitigating optical damage for high-intensity lasers and for understanding meteoroid impacts. Experimental work has placed some thermodynamic bounds on the formation of high-pressure phases of this material, but the formation kinetics and underlying microscopic mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. In this study, by employing multi-scale molecular dynamics studies of shock-compressed fused silica and quartz, we find that silica transforms into a poor glass former that subsequently exhibits ultrafast crystallization within a few nanoseconds. We also find that, as a result of the formation of such an intermediate disordered phase, the transition between silica polymorphs obeys a homogeneous reconstructive nucleation and grain growth model. We construct a quantitative model of nucleation and grain growth, and compare its predictions with high-pressure silica crystal grain sizes observed in laser-induced damage and meteoroid impact events. Moreover, we have studied the quantum nuclear effects for high-pressure silica crystallization. While quantum nuclear effects play important roles in shock-induced chemical reactions and phase transitions, they are absent in classical atomistic shock simulations. To address this shortcoming, we couple the shock simulation with a colored-noise Langevin thermostat. We find that this semiclassical approach gives shock temperatures as much as 7% higher than classical simulations near the onset of crystallization in silica. We have also studied the impact of this approach on the kinetics of crystallization and the position of high-pressure silica melt line.
Book
1 online resource.
Spins are upset maneuvers in which an asymmetric stall over an airplane's wing causes it to enter a steep downward helical trajectory, often with reduced, annulled, or reversed control surface effectiveness. If these occur at low altitude, there might not be enough airspace to recover before colliding with the ground. Historically, this hazard has been addressed by careful aerodynamic design to suppress or minimize spin tendencies, and by flight crew training. Despite major reductions in accident rates, improvements have stagnated in recent decades, requiring new approaches to the problem. This dissertation proposes a software enabled approach, developing algorithms that can detect spins at an early stage and automatically recover with minimal altitude loss. To enable this study, a high angle of attack aerodynamic model of a typical general aviation aircraft is identified from wind tunnel and flight data. Using this model, the minimal altitude optimal control problem is investigated, and a spin recovery controller is designed. In addition, the relation between arrest delay and altitude loss is quantified, showing that altitude loss grows rapidly within the first turn. Motivated by these results, a methodology for designing spin detection schemes using different sensors is proposed. The methodology is applied to the same general aviation aircraft showing that detection at an early stage of the incipient phase is possible, resulting in as much as a fourfold reduction in altitude loss with respect to recovery from one-turn spins by a human pilot. Finally, the spin detection and recovery system is tested on small-scale UAVs, demonstrating the predicted fourfold altitude loss reduction. The results obtained indicate that such a system could help reduce spin-related accident rates by as much as 45%.
Book
1 online resource.
Wnt signaling has been implicated in the regulation of many adult stem cell populations. Using the expression of the universal Wnt target gene, Axin2, our lab has identified a privileged population of Wnt responding hepatocytes adjacent to the central vein in the uninjured adult liver. Our lineage tracing studies show that Axin2+ hepatocytes self-renew and proliferate, contributing to normal liver tissue homeostasis. These Axin2+ hepatocyte stem cells are located adjacent to Wnt secreting endothelial cells of the central vein and express Tbx3, an embryonic hepatocyte progenitor marker. Additionally, these pericentral hepatocyte stem cells are diploid in nature, but give rise to mature polyploid hepatocytes that span the rest of the liver lobule. Thus, we conclude that pericentral Axin2+ hepatocytes, under the regulation of endothelial derived Wnt signaling, behave as hepatocyte stem cells in adult mouse liver homeostasis. Our finding that Wnt signaling regulates the proliferation of hepatocyte stem cells in the uninjured liver gave rise to the hypothesis that perhaps similar mechanisms may also regulate hepatocyte proliferation following injury. Carbon tetrachloride toxicity is a well-accepted experimental injury model that induces acute centrilobular necrosis in the liver, resulting in a localized liver injury. Carbon tetrachloride injury destroys pericentral hepatocyte stem cells, but interestingly, I found that de novo Wnt signaling is initiated during the injury repair process. Hepatocytes adjacent to the injury border express Axin2 approximately 2-3 days after injury. Lineage tracing and label dilution studies show that these injury-induced Wnt responding hepatocytes proliferate, actively contributing to the repair of the local damaged tissue. Interestingly, the hepatocyte progenitor marker Tbx3 is upregulated in hepatocytes that line the injury border during the repair process. Additionally, Wnt 2, 4, 5a, and 9b expression is upregulated following injury and is observed specifically in the damaged liver tissue. Functional studies show that blockade of Wnt secretion from endothelial cells in the injured liver results in delayed hepatocyte entry into the cell cycle following injury. Furthermore, deletion of beta-catenin, the major signal transducer of the Wnt signaling pathway, in Axin2+ hepatocytes following injury leads to delayed tissue repair and increased mortality. Together, these studies demonstrate the importance of Wnt signaling in regulating hepatocyte proliferation in both homeostasis and in response to local liver injury.
Book
1 online resource.
In this thesis, I explore how bacteria change shape. I used the model bacterial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti, which undergoes significant changes in cell shape during its nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with legume plants. Nitrogen is a limiting nutrient in the environment, and nitrogen-containing fertilizers are heavily used in agricultural systems. Organically available (fixed) nitrogen is energetically expensive to produce. Legume plants, in symbiosis with rhizobia soil bacteria, are able to fix nitrogen and do not require nitrogen-containing fertilizers. The model system of Medicago sativa (alfalfa) and the soil bacterium S. meliloti permit laboratory study of this process. As the human population continues to grow, it is essential to understand the conditions that are required for biological nitrogen fixation. M. sativa and S. meliloti initiate symbiosis by exchanging chemical calling cards. S. meliloti cells then invade plant roots. M. sativa forms nodules -- specialized root organs -- to house the bacteria. S. meliloti cells within the nodules differentiate to form nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. These bacteroid cells can be ten times larger and contain twenty times more genomic DNA than free-living cells, and they are often branched in contrast to the rod shaped bacteria found in the soil. The purpose of this dramatic morphological switch is not well understood but appears to be essential for nitrogen fixation. I used different culture media and environmental conditions and examined bacterial mutants to investigate what external factors are involved in S. meliloti free-living cell shape. I tested multiple conditions including microaerobic versus aerobic, salt concentrations in culture media, a range of temperatures, and different carbon sources. Of all these conditions, I discovered that only the presence of phosphate in growth media was strongly correlated to branching and an increase in cell size. This morphology is specifically related to the activity of a phosphate transporter-encoding gene, pstC. This result was confirmed through whole genome sequencing and epistatic expression of mutated and full-length pstC in different laboratory strains of S. meliloti. I hypothesize that an increase in extracellular phosphate concentration may be present within root nodules and may contribute to bacteroid differentiation. More work remains to be done to determine the role of phosphate in legume/rhizobia symbiosis and uncover the mechanism by which phosphate affects cell morphology.
Book
1 online resource.
Faults are one of the building-blocks for subsurface modeling studies. Incomplete observations of subsurface fault networks lead to uncertainty pertaining to location, geometry and existence of faults. In practice, gaps in incomplete fault network observations are filled based on tectonic knowledge and structural interpreter's intuition pertaining to fault relationships. Modeling fault network uncertainty with realistic models that represent tectonic knowledge is still a challenge. Although methods that address specific sources of fault network uncertainty and complexities of fault modeling exists, a unifying framework is still lacking. In this paper, a rigorous approach to quantify fault network uncertainty is proposed. Fault pattern and intensity information pertaining to fault networks are expressed by means of a marked point process, namely a marked Strauss point process. Fault network information represented using marked Strauss point process is constrained to fault surface observations (complete or partial) within a Bayesian framework. A structural prior model is defined to quantitatively express fault patterns, geometries and relationships within the Bayesian framework. Structural relationships between faults, in particular age-based fault abutting relations, are represented with an implicit, level-set based approach to represent abutting relations between fault surfaces. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler is used to sample posterior fault network realizations that reflect tectonic knowledge and match fault observations. We apply the methodology to a field study from Nankai Trough and Kumano Basin. In this illustrative study, the target for uncertainty quantification is a deep site with attenuated seismic data with only partially visible faults and many faults missing from the survey or interpretation. A structural prior model is built from shallow analog sites that are believed to have undergone similar tectonics compared to the site of study. Fault network uncertainty for the field is quantified with fault network realizations that are conditioned to structural rules, tectonic information and partially observed fault surfaces. The proposed methodology generates realistic fault network models conditioned to data and a conceptual model of the underlying tectonics. In the second part of the thesis, an approach to incorporate fault network uncertainty in fluid flow problems is proposed. The main challenge is creating multiple structural frameworks and creating deformable grids prior to fluid flow simulation. Proxy-based workflow are presented in order to choose fault network realizations that result in most dissimilar fluid-flow responses. Thus, the computational load of evaluating exhaustive set of fault network realizations is reduced to a select few. The proxy-based approach is illustrated using a field case.
Book
1 online resource.
This dissertation examines the role of art and visual culture in the Ethiopian revolution of 1974, and the ensuing years of Marxist Leninist military dictatorship that followed. It argues that revolutionary change hinged upon a process of visual revelation, and that this process, although begun in earnest by artists and students who sought to challenge authority, was ultimately hijacked by those who would use images not to liberate, but to control. As such, this dissertation examines the positions of art and its makers both at the heart of radical domestic political change, and on the final frontier of the Cold War in Africa. Whilst exploring the ways in which the military sought to harness and utilize artists, this research stresses the survival of creativity even under duress. Four chapters examine, respectively, the centrality of art, photography and film in the downfall of Emperor Haile Selassie, the rapid growth and unexpected trajectory of graphic art, the push for realism and the import of Soviet art concepts, and the politics of cultural heritage both as propaganda and resistance. Addis Ababa is positioned as the main cultural hub, yet the sojourns of young artists to Moscow, Leningrad, Pyongyang and Havana offer insights into the complex global networks of cultural exchange in which Ethiopia's artists were enmeshed. Between 1974 and 1991 Ethiopia was a dictatorship, but Ethiopia's artists were not simply passive propagandists. Their works provide a rich, visual chronicle of an era rife with wavering ideological positions, rampant disillusionment and manifold acts of creative disobedience.
Book
1 online resource.
Since the turn of the 21st century, the international aid community has embraced an unprecedented focus on education in situations of conflict and emergency. This dissertation argues that this growing global focus indicates a dramatic shift in how the world responds to humanitarian crises and how it envisions the role of education. It points to an earlier world in which humanitarian and development domains were more strictly divided and where education, though integral part of development, was not seen as a necessary social service to be delivered in times of humanitarian emergency. In three articles, the dissertation examines the factors that have facilitated today's unprecedented global mobilization around education in crisis settings, studies the striking expansion of a global network that has been integral to this mobilization, and investigates how global specialists experience their work in this emergent professional field.
Book
1 online resource.
In this dissertation, we describe, implement, and test wavefunctions that describe short-range, so called dynamic correlation effects through the use of explicitly correlated geminal pair functions. We present both a single-configuration explicitly correlated analogue of a Hartree-Fock wavefunction, and a multi- configurational variant, a Geminal-augmented Complete Active Space Self Consistent Field method. These methods are designed to efficiently include dynamic correlation effects during variational optimization of the wavefunction, rather than resorting to a post hoc perturbation description. We test both methods on a number of model systems and show that the geminal-augmented wavefunction is capable of describing short-range correlation effects. In addition, we present a fully exact implementation of the algorithms necessary to evaluate the many-electron integrals that arise in explicitly correlated wavefunctions.
Book
1 online resource (7 pages). Digital: text file.
Collection
Free EEMs
Book
1 online resource.
The nature of the news media's political influence depends crucially on the type and volume of political information that citizens encounter when they read, listen and watch the news. This dissertation examines the causes and consequences of this political coverage. The first paper introduces a new empirical approach to test two long-standing accounts of media bias in the mainstream press. Studying election predictions offered by several specialized media outlets that receive a prominent place in news coverage of congressional elections, I find evidence of an institutional bias in which media ratings are overly favorable towards the electoral prospects of incumbent politicians relative to their challengers. At the same time, this approach offers no evidence of a partisan bias in which these outlets favor candidates from one political party at the expense of the other. The second paper examines the consequences of the political information environment for the public's reliance on party labels to evaluate politicians. Using a doubly-randomized conjoint experiment and an observational study of voting in congressional elections, I show that greater amounts of information reduce the role of partisanship in candidate choice. These findings challenge competing claims that partisan cues inhibit responsiveness to such a degree that voters fail to use other information or that high-information environments increase voter reliance on partisanship. The third paper explores the consequences of a recent change in the local media environment. Newspapers produce political coverage read by a large number of readers, yet they do so with 30% fewer reporters and editors than a decade ago. This rapid decline is thought to pose a threat to the provision of political news. This paper employs two new sources of data to directly measure changes in newspaper staffing and examine their effect on newspapers' attention to local, state and national politics. I show that declines in staffing lead to less political coverage, an effect that is particularly pronounced for local political news. Given that newspapers serve as the primary source of original reporting on local politics, this suggests staffing declines have broad consequences for the local media environment.
Book
1 online resource (8 pages). Digital: text file.
Collection
French Jewish cemetery registers
Book
1 online resource (13 pages). Digital: text file.
Collection
French Jewish cemetery registers
Book
1 online resource (2 text files, 10, 10 pages). Digital: text file.
Collection
Free EEMs
  • [partie 1]. Cimetière de Verdun à Creil (60-Oise en Picardie), division J-1
  • partie 2. Cimetière de Verdun à Creil dans le département de l'Oise (60) en Picardie, dans une division au nord du cimetière ? le long du mur à côté de la sortie nord et de la division X.