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Archive/Manuscript
18 linear feet
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Set is incomplete; there is nothing before 1937, little for 1941 and 1943, and nothing for 1952, 1954 and 1955. There is a partial card file index.
Special Collections
Book
xxxiv, 164 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Green Library, Special Collections
Book
x, 220 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction / by Ilan Stavans
  • Angie Luna
  • A rock trying to be a stone
  • Espíritu Santo
  • Remembering possibilities
  • The snake
  • Time magician
  • The abuelita
  • The gardener
  • The last tortilla
  • Punching chickens
  • Day of the dead
  • My life in the city
  • Acknowledgments.
"She asked me if I liked them. And what could I say? They were wonderful." From the very beginning of Sergio Troncoso's celebrated story "Angie Luna, " we know we are in the hands of a gifted storyteller. Born of Mexican immigrants, raised in El Paso, and now living in New York City, Troncoso has a rare knack for celebrating life. Writing in a straightforward, light-handed style reminiscent of Grace Paley and Raymond Carver, he spins charming tales that reflect his experiences in two worlds. Troncoso's El Paso is a normal town where common people who happen to be Mexican eat, sleep, fall in love, and undergo epiphanies just like everyone else. His tales are coming-of-age stories from the Mexican-American border, stories of the working class, stories of those coping with the trials of growing old in a rapidly changing society. He also explores New York with vignettes of life in the big city, capturing its loneliness and danger. Beginning with Troncoso's widely acclaimed story "Angie Luna, " the tale of a feverish love affair in which a young man rediscovers his Mexican heritage and learns how much love can hurt, these stories delve into the many dimensions of the human condition. We watch boys playing a game that begins innocently but takes a dangerous turn. We see an old Anglo woman befriending her Mexican gardener because both are lonely. We witness a man terrorized in his New York apartment, taking solace in memories of lost love. Two new stories will be welcomed by Troncoso's readers. "My Life in the City" relates a transplanted Texan's yearning for companionship in New York, while "The Last Tortilla" returns to the Southwest to explore family strains after a mother's death--and the secret behind that death. Each reflects an insight about the human heart that has already established the author's work in literary circles. Troncoso sets aside the polemics about social discomfort sometimes found in contemporary Chicano writing and focuses instead on the moral and intellectual lives of his characters. The twelve stories gathered here form a richly textured tapestry that adds to our understanding of what it is to be human.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780816519613 20180604
www.aspresolver.com Latino Literature
Green Library, Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
66 linear feet
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
The Sánchez Papers contain the personal and professional papers of Ricardo Sánchez. Included are the following series: Manuscripts by Sánchez, Correspondence, Personal Papers and Memorabilia, Subject Files, Manuscripts by Other Authors, Publications by Other Authors, Photographs, and Audiovisual Materials. Materials focus on Sánchez's life and career, as well as on Chicano artistic and political history in general.
Special Collections
Book
v, 121 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library, Special Collections
Book
36 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections
Book
[2], viii, 31, [1] pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • Introduction / by Heriberto Teran
  • Forward / by Aurelio Montemayor
  • Welcome to America
  • A thin gust of air
  • Dust
  • Meaningless symbols
  • Metamorphosis
  • Did you
  • American bitch
  • Bore of a gun
  • Dead orator
  • Tale
  • The cold of spring
  • On a young man's grave
  • The undesireable
  • Died
  • The outcast
  • Do you want
  • The message
  • Time has come
  • In America
  • The beauty of you
  • Funerals
  • Vision of a dictator
  • Soldier of the night
  • Clocks
  • When I die
  • Los quemados
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving), SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections
Book
64 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
A thirteen-year-old Mexican American girl describes her home, family, school, and daily experiences in a California grape-growing community.
Special Collections
Book
247 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library, Special Collections
Book
207 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library, Special Collections

91. Ghost sickness [1997]

Book
95 p. ; 23 cm.
www.aspresolver.com Latino Literature
Special Collections
Book
92 pages ; 22 cm
Loners, families, fathers, wives--anyone who lives on the border between Mexico and the United States also lives on a border of violence and complexity. Here a master of Chicano noir explores that world in lean and haunting stories that you will never forget.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780826353344 20160612
SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections

93. Brownsville [2003]

Book
192 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library, Special Collections

94. Office Files, 1973-1980 [1973 - 1980]

Archive/Manuscript
.25 linear ft.
Special Collections

95. Libro de Registros, 1934-1942 [1934 - 1942]

Archive/Manuscript
1 v.(148 p.)
Includes a listing of the original members, together with addresses, phone numbers, professions, and civil status. Later entries, from 1937 to 1942, are records of amounts deposited by individuals.
Special Collections
Book
x, 147 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library, Special Collections
Book
lii, 355 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
Green Library, Special Collections

98. Atisbos [1975 - 1978]

Journal/Periodical
v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections
Book
195 p. : ill. ; 11 x 18 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections
Book
xxi, 522 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.
Once an independent nation, Texas has always been proud of its unique culture. The literature of the Lone Star State has long attracted local, regional, and national audiences and critics, yet the state's Mexican American voices have yet to receive the attention they deserve. "Hecho en Tejas" is a historic anthology that establishes the canon of Mexican American literature in Texas. With close to one hundred selections chosen, the book reaches back to the sixteenth-century exploration narrative of Texas' first Spanish-speaking writer, Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca. It features prose by Americo Paredes and Jovita Gonzalez, Rolando Hinojosa and Tomas Rivera, Estela Trambley Portillo, and Sandra Cisneros. Among the poets included in the anthology are Ricardo Sanchez, Carmen Tafolla, Angela de Hoyos, and Abelardo 'Lalo' Delgado. "Hecho en Tejas" also includes corridos from the turn of the century and verses sung by music legends such as Lydia Mendoza and Santiago Jimenez, Sr., Freddy Fender, and Selena. In addition to these established names, already known across the United States, "Hecho en Tejas" introduces such younger writers as Christine Granados, Erasmo Guerra, and Tonantzin Canestaro-Garcia, the famous Tejano authors of tomorrow. In assembling this canonic reader, Dagoberto Gilb has created more than an anthology. Read cover to cover, "Hecho en Tejas" becomes not only a literary showcase, but also a cultural and historical narrative both for those familiar with Texas Mexicans and for outsiders. "Hecho en Tejas" is a mosaic portrait of the community, the land and its history, its people's sorrows and joys, anger and humour and pride, what has been assimilated and what will not be.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780826341259 20160528
Green Library, Special Collections

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