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1. The Tube Guys [2008]

Green Library, Special Collections
Book
ix, 297 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • I: Moira: May and Billy
  • 'I've got dark eyes. I can frighten people'
  • The lightness of being
  • II: Hubris: war and the transistor
  • 'Of a highly explosive character'
  • 'I hope you have better luck in the future'
  • 'I think we better call Shockley'
  • 'There's enough glory in this for everybody'
  • ' ... To do my climbing by moonlight & unroped'
  • 'Well-equipped female with brains'
  • III: Nemesis: silicon valley and obsession
  • 'Really peculiar ideas about how to motivate people'
  • 'Three generations of imbeciles are enough'
  • 'What law of nature have you discovered?'
  • 'Someday we may actually be terrible alone'
  • 'The high cost of thinking the unthinkable'
  • 'I love you'.
Green Library, Special Collections
Book
xiii, 642 p., [14] p. of plates : ill. ; 26 cm.
Fred Terman was an outstanding American engineer, teacher, entrepreneur and manager. Terman was also deeply devoted to his students, to engineering, and to Stanford University. This biography focuses on the weave of personality and place across time - it examines Terman as a Stanford faculty child growing up at an ambitious little regional university; as a young electrical engineering professor in the heady 1920s and the doldrums of the Depression; as an engineering manager and educator in the midst of large-scale wartime research projects and the postwar rise of Big Science and Big Engineering; as a university administrator on the razors edge of great expectations and fragile budgets; and, finally, as a senior statesman of engineering education. The first doctoral student of Vannevar Bush at M.I.T., Terman was himself a prodigious teacher and adviser to many, including William Hewlett and David Packard. Terman was widely hailed as the magnet that drew talent together into what became known as Silicon Valley. Throughout his life, Fred Terman was constant in his belief that quality could be quantified, and he was adamant that a university's success must, in the end, be measured by the success of its students. Fred Terman's formula for success, both in life and for his university, was fairly simple: hard work and persistence, systematic dedication to clearly articulated goals, accountability, and not settling for mediocre work in yourself or in others.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804749145 20160528
Green Library, Engineering Library (Terman), SAL3 (off-campus storage), Science Library (Li and Ma), Special Collections
Book
608 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.
Special Collections
Book
xii, 421 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
The metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) transistor is the fundamental element of digital electronics. The tens of millions of transistors in the typical home - in personal computers, automobiles, appliances, and toys - are almost all MOS transistors. This book is devoted to the history of the MOS transistor, which overthrew the previously dominant bipolar transistor and made digital electronics ubiquitous. Combining technological with corporate history, the author examines the breakthroughs of individual innovators as well as the research and development power (and problems) of companies such as IBM, Intel, and Fairchild. Bassett discusses how the MOS transistor was invented but spurned at Bell Labs, and then how, in the early 1960s, spurred on by the possibilities of integrated circuits, RCA, Fairchild, and IBM all launched substantial MOS R&D programmes. The development of the MOS transistor involved an industry-wide effort, and Bassett emphasizes how communication among researchers from different firms played a critical role in advancing the new technology. Bassett sheds substantial new light on the development of the integrated circuit, Moore's Law, the success of Silicon Valley start-ups as compared to vertically integrated East Coast firms, the development of the microprocessor, and IBM's multi-billion-dollar losses in the early 1990s. The book is an account of the intricate R&D process behind a technological device that transformed modern society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780801868092 20160528
Green Library, Special Collections
Book
ix, 218 p., [15] leaves of plates : ill., ports. ; 29 cm.
Green Library, Engineering Library (Terman), Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
1 v., 226 p.
Subjects covered by the interviews include his teaching and research career at Stanford University, the National Defense Research Committee, the Harvard Radio Research Laboratory, post-war research at Stanford, and the electronics industry, especially the Hewlett-Packard Company and its founders William R. Hewlett and David Packard.
Engineering Library (Terman), Special Collections
Book
xv, 304 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections
Book
314 p. : ill., port. ; 24 cm.
Green Library, Engineering Library (Terman), SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections
Book
192 p. : ill, ports. ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections
Book
xiv, 194 p. illus. (part col.), ports. 24cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections

12. The Atlantic cable [1959]

Book
96 p. illus., ports., 2 maps (1 fold. col.) facsims. 28 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections
Journal/Periodical
v. : ill. ; 23 cm
Special Collections
Book
26 p. ; 21 cm.
Special Collections
Book
94 p. illus. 20 cm.
Special Collections
Book
84 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
  • Part I. Machine methods of computation and numerical analysis: 1. General comments
  • 2. Graduate school research; 2.1: Index to reports, 2.2: Progress reports, 2.3: Final reports.
  • 3. Academic program; 3.1: Institute courses and seminars, 3.2: Group activities
  • Part II. Project Whirlwind: 1: Review and problem index, 2: Whirlwind coding and applications: 2.1: Introduction, 2.2: Problems Being Solved
  • Appendices: 1: Publications, 2: Visitors, 3: Personnel of the projects.
Foreword: This is a combined report for the two projects at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology which are sponsored by the Office of Naval Research under Contract N5ori60. Project on Machine Methods of Computation and Numerical Analysis: This Project is an outgrowth of the activities of the Institute Committee on Machine Methods of Computation, established in November 1950. The purpose of the Project is (1) to integrate the efforts of all the departments and groups at M.I.T. who are working with modern computing machines and their applications, and (2) to train men in the use of these machines for computation and numerical analysis. ... Project Whirlwind: This Project makes use of the facilities of the Digital Computer Laboratory. The principal objective of the Project is the application of an electronic digital computer of large capacity and very high speed (Whirlwind I) to problems in mathematics, science, engineering, simulation, and control. The Whirlwind I Computer: Whirlwind I is of the high-speed electronic digital type, in which quantities are represented as discrete numbers, and complex problems are solved by the repeated use of fundamental arithmetic and logical (i.e., control or selection) operations. Computations are executed by fractional-microsecond pulses in electronic circuits, of which the principal ones are (1) the flip-flop, a circuit containing two vacuum tubes so connected that one tube or the other is conducting, but not both; (2) the gate or coincidence circuit; (3) the magnetic-core memory, in which binary digits are stored as one of two directions of magnetic flux within ferro-magnetic cores. Whirlwind I uses numbers of 16 binary digits (equivalent to about 5 decimal digits). This length was selected to limit the machine to a practical size, but it permits the computation of many simulation problems. Calculations requiring.greater number length are handled by the use of multiple-length numbers. Rapid-access magnetic-core memory has a capacity of 32,768 binary digits. Present speed of the computer is 40,000 single-address operations per second, equivalent to about 20,000 multiplications per second.
Special Collections
Book
120 pages in various pagings : illustrations ; 28 cm.
Special Collections
Book
2 volumes : illustrations ; 28 cm.
  • v. 1. Text--v. 2. Drawings.
Special Collections
Book
4 pages ; 29 cm
Special Collections
Book
xii, 247 p. illus., ports. 23 cm.
Special Collections