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Newspaper
1 v. : ill. (some col.), ports ; 37 cm.
Special Collections
Book
1 v. : ill. (col.), facsims., maps ; 44 cm.
Special Collections
Book
232 p. : ill., maps, ports. ; 32 cm.
  • Introduction 8-- Editor's Note 14-- Part 1: Dundee to Antarctica (1900 to 11th January 1902) 15-- In which: Discovery is built, provisioned and feted before setting sail for the unknown south-- the expedition reaches the Antarctic continent five months later having visited Madeira, South Trinidad, South Africa, Macquarie Island and New Zealand en route for coaling, reprovisioning, repairs and scientific purposes, being met everywhere with generosity and hospitality. Part 2: In the Ross Sea (12th January to 10th March 1902) 43-- in which: Discovery steams south in search of a safe winter haven-- land is discovered on the far side of the 'Great Ice Barrier', the ship reaching further East than any previous expedition-- the first Antarctic flight is made by hydrogen balloon-- the expedition establishes Winter Quarters in McMurdo 'Bay' to the South West of Ross Island-- a number of preliminary sledging journeys are undertaken. Part 3: The Fading of the Light (10th March to 30th April 1902) 64-- In which: the Cape Crozier party fails to reach the message post and the return of Barne's party ends in tragedy-- the ship is frozen in and preparations are made for winter-- the engineering department is kept very busy, not least by the troublesome windmill intended to light the ship through the months of darkness-- the 'Great Emperor penguin hunt' provides good sport-- and spirits are raised with the first issue of the 'South Polar Times'. Part 4: The First Winter (1st May to 31st August 1902) 82-- In which: the windmill is finally blown to smithereens, to the relief of the engineering department-- all types of scientific endeavour continue, only suspended in the wild worst of weather-- Bernacchi and Skelton almost perish in a blizzard within a quarter of a mile of the ship-- many forms of entertainment are devised to while away the time on board-- all hands take exercise outside when they can and experience the magic of the aurora and the profound silence of calm moonlit days-- preparations begin for the forthcoming sledging season. Part 5: Sledging Near and Far (1st September to 29th November 1902) 106-- in which: the expedition's sledgers develop their skills, through numerous short reconnaissance and depot-laying outings, in preparation for the epic journeys to come later in the season-- Royds' party succeeds in reaching the Cape Crozier message post with information of Discovery's whereabouts for the relief ship-- Skelton, with Evans and Quartley, discovers the first Emperor penguin colony seen by humans and takes the first photographs of Emperor chicks-- Scott's party start on their journey to explore as far South as possible-- Armitage organises sports to celebrate the King's birthday. Part 6: Discovery of the Polar Plateau (27th November 1902 to 19th January 1903) 135-- in which: Armitage's 12-man party, including Skelton, set out for the Western Mountains-- having ascended the Blue Glacier, they find further progress blocked by high mountains and are obliged to negotiate a steep descent to the Ferrar Glacier-- a number of seal carcases are found at mystifyingly high altitudes-- a plateau is reached at 9,000 ft-- Armitage and the fitter members of the party venture as far across the plateau as time allows, but their hope of finding its far side is not fulfilled-- all then return to the ship with one man, Macfarlane, seriously unwell. Part 7: Relief, but no Escape (19th January to 23rd September 1903) 158-- in which: Discovery rejoices at the arrival of the relief ship Morning, bringing mail, coal and other provisions-- Scott, Shackleton and Wilson return from their furthest South journey, no dogs having survived-- all efforts to free Discovery from the ice fail and her ship's company face a second year in Antarctica-- Morning returns to New Zealand with ten of Discovery's men, including Shackleton who is invalided home, his place in the Ward Room being taken by Mulock of the Morning-- food supplies are augmented by catching seals, skuas and fish-- Skelton sets up acetylene lighting, the winter passing quietly with scientific work and sledging preparations continuing as before. Part 8: Final Sledging, then Home Again (23rd September 1903 to 8th September 1904) 186-- in which: Skelton accompanies Scott on a second Western journey but is obliged to return prematurely when two members of the party are taken ill-- human efforts to free Discovery, before and after the relief ships Morning & Terra Nova arrive, fail until a swell breaks the ice up-- all three ships set sail for New Zealand, stopping briefly at the Auckland Islands where the ship is cleaned up and repainted, and the ship's company enjoy good hunting-- Discovery spends two months in New Zealand, during which time Skelton becomes engaged to Sybil, before voyaging home via South America, the Falkland Islands and the Azores. Acknowledgements 223-- Discovery Ship's Company in the Antarctic 224-- List of Illustrations 226-- Index 230.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781873877685 20160527
Reginald Skelton Was Chief Engineer, And Offical Photographer To Captain Scott's Discovery Expedition; My memories of my grandfather are of an old, but still fit and upright, man who had a deep gravelly voice and chuckled a lot. I was only ten when he died in 1956 and he never, as far as I can remember, told me anything about his time in the Antarctic. Forty two years after his death we had, in a sense, changed places and I was getting the full story. By then into my fifties, seated in the library at the Scott Polar Research Institute (SPRI) in Cambridge, I began reading the Antarctic journals of Reginald Skelton, not yet out of his twenties, who had been chosen as Scott's chief engineer on the Discovery Expedition. Directly outside the window in front of my desk was the building site which was to become the bright, airy Shackleton Memorial Library. The archivist, Bob Headland, apologised for the terrible noise of the construction work, which he feared would frustrate any attempt to concentrate, but all I could hear was the sound of the Discovery's bows scrunching through the pack ice and the howl of the Antarctic wind as the ship fought to hold her own in the teeth of storm force Southerly squalls off Coulman Island. Since then I have been back to Cambridge to read the seven volumes of Reginald Skelton's Discovery Journals, and his sledging diaries, more times than I can keep track of but every time something new catches my attention. There is a freshness in this account, written by a young man describing events even as they take place, as he experiences them without knowing what is to follow, which is lost in any retrospective telling of the tale. Through the publication of this book I hope many other people, who would not otherwise have the opportunity to read the original journals, will be able to share the pleasure of vicarious participation in the Expedition. There is another purpose in bringing this book to the public. Skelton, whose name is by no means universally known, was, nevertheless, an important member of the Expedition and many books about Discovery include quotations from his journals. Since becoming familiar with the journals, I have found out that not all these passages are faithfully reproduced. I am aware of at least two supposedly scholarly books which contain misquotations from Skelton's journals. Whereas innocent mistakes can be made in interpreting hand-written documents, the distortion in some instances is of an order which suggests deliberate misrepresentation. The present book gives all serious students of the history of Antarctic exploration access to the full authentic text.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781873877685 20160527
Green Library, Special Collections
Book
288 p. : chiefly ill., map ; 31 cm
Special Collections
Map
1 portfolio : map, facsim. ; 47 x 52 cm.
  • Portfolio cover
  • Text
  • Provincia de Nicaragua
  • Río Matina
  • Provincia de Talamanca.
Special Collections
Map
1 portfolio : map, facsim. ; 42 x 54 cm.
  • Map of Mississippi
  • Text by María Antonia Colomar.
Special Collections
Map
1 portfolio : maps, facsim. ; 51 x 63 cm.
  • La Serena de Coquimbo (1743) / Nicolas Padilla (?)
  • Concepción de Chile (1752)
  • Convento de Carmelitas Descalzas de San Rafael en Santiago de Chile (1773)
Special Collections
Book
144 p. : ill., (some col.), maps ; 21 cm.
Edward Adrian Wilson is perhaps the most famous native son of Cheltenham. In the early years of the 20th century, he was one of the major influences and personalities of the heroic age of Antarctic exploration and has also been recognised as one of the top ranking ornithologists and naturalists in the UK during this period. He was also one of the last great scientific expedition artists. This is the illustrated story of polar explorer Edward Wilson, from his boyhood in Cheltenham to the diaries and letters associated with his last days as a member of Scott's ill-fated Antarctic expedition. All the royalties from this book will benefit the Wilson Collection Fund at the Cheltenham Art Gallery and Museums.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781873877456 20160605
Edward Adrian Wilson is prehaps the most famous native son of Cheltenham. In the early years of the 20th century, he was one of the major influences and personalities of the heroic age of Antartic exploration, and was also a recognized ornithologist and naturalist, as well as a scientific expedition artist. This biography of him draws on the work of his father, his published diaries and the three volumes on his life published by George Seaver in the 1930s and 40s.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781873877548 20160605
Special Collections
Map
2 CD-ROMs ; 4 3/4 in. + 1 insert.
  • Read disc
  • examine disc.
Digitized facsimile of 1595 ed. form the Lessing J. Rosenwald Collection at the Library of Congress. Text is searchable.
Media & Microtext Center, Special Collections
Map
1 atlas ([138] leaves of plates (some folded)) : ill., maps, facsims. ; 50 cm + 1 fasc. (44 p.)
Special Collections

11. Site plan, Tel Aviv [1994]

Map
1 map : col. ; on sheet 98 x 69 cm.
Special Collections
Book
1 atlas (88 p.) : ill., col. maps ; 34 cm.
Green Library, Special Collections
Book
[188] p., [10] leaves of plates : ill. ; 28 cm. + 1 booklet (1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 25 cm.)
  • The ascent of Mount Erebus / T.W. Edgeworth David.
  • Midwinter night / Nemo.
  • Trials of a messman / A messman.
  • A pony watch / Putty
  • Southward bound / Lapsus Linguae.
  • An interview with an emperor / A.F.M.
  • Erebus / Nemo.
  • An ancient manuscript / Shellback.
  • Life under difficulties / James Murray.
  • Bathybia / Douglas Mawson.
Special Collections

14. Forma urbis Romae [1893]

Book
1 atlas (1 case ([viii], 12 p., 46 folded leaves of plates)) : 47 col. plans (46 folded) ; 69 cm.
Special Collections
Map
2 maps on one sheet : col. ; 35 x 20 cm. and 18 x 20 cm., sheet 46 x 53 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections
Book
184 p., [24] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
Now in paperback, a biography of Captain Oates, who is best remembered as the man who walked willingly to his death on the ill-fated expedition to the South Pole led by Captain Scott, in order that his comrades might have a better chance to survive.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780713426939 20160605
Special Collections
Map
1 atlas (xi, 184, 4 p.) : chiefly col. maps ; 47 cm.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner), Special Collections
Book
v. : ill., plans ; 22 x 30 cm.
  • [1] Pene ha-ʻir
  • [2] Tokhnit pituaḥ ʻironit
  • [3] Mimtsaʼim ṿe-hamlatsot : duaḥ male
Special Collections
Book
32 p. ill. 22 x 28 cm.
Special Collections
Book
345 p. ; 22 cm.
Special Collections