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Book
120 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

2. The lord of the rings [1982 - 1983]

Book
3 v. ; 23 cm.
  • pt. 1 The fellowship of the ring
  • pt. 2 The two towers
  • pt. 3 The return of the king.
Green Library, SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving), SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 358 pages ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 432 pages ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 476 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
423 p. fold. map. 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 160 pages ; 23 cm
  • Introduction
  • The wages of heroism
  • The bitter end
  • Songs and stones
  • Haunting the dead
  • Applicability: "Hope without guarantees".
In 1956, J. R. R. Tolkien famously stated that the real theme of The Lord of the Rings was "Death and Immortality." The deaths that underscore so much of the subject matter of Tolkien's masterpiece have a great deal to teach us. From the heroic to the humble, Tolkien draws on medieval concepts of death and dying to explore the glory and sorrow of human mortality. Three great themes of death link medieval Northern European culture, The Lord of the Rings, and con- temporary culture: the way in which we die, the need to remember the dead, and above all the lingering apprehension of what happens after death. Like our medieval ancestors, we still talk about what it means to die as a hero, a traitor, or a coward; we still make decisions about ways to honor and remember the departed; and we continue to seek to appease and contain the dead. These themes suggest a la- tent resonance between medieval and modern cultures and raise an issue not generally discussed in contemporary Western society: our deeply rooted belief that how one dies in some way matters. While Tolkien, as a medieval scholar, naturally draws much of his inspiration from the literature, folklore, and legends of the Middle Ages, the popularity of his work affirms that modern audiences continue to find these tropes relevant and useful. From ideas of "good" and "bad" deaths to proper commemoration and disposal of the dead, and even to ghost stories, real people find comfort in the ideas about death and dying that Tolkien explores. " The Sweet and the Bitter": Death and Dying in J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings examines the ways in which Tolkien's masterwork makes visible the connections between medieval and modern conceptions of dying and analyzes how contemporary readers use The Lord of the Rings as a tool for dealing with death.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781606353059 20180306
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 156 pages ; 25 cm
  • Introduction
  • Community, or "power with"
  • Dialectic, or "power from"
  • Oppression, or "power over"
  • Dis-, re-, un-empowered: journeying and environment
  • Conclusion: morality and environment.
With the box office successes of movies based on The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit, familiarity with J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-Earth is growing. Unfortunately, scholarship dealing with Middle-Earth itself is comparatively rare in Tolkien studies, and students and scholars seeking greater insight have few resources. Similarly, although public concern for the environment is widespread and "going green" has never been trendier, ecocriticism is also an underserved area of literary studies. Arda Inhabited fills a gap in both areas by combining ecocritical and broader postmodern concerns with the growing appreciation for Tolkien's Middle-Earth. Susan Jeffers looks at the way different groups and individuals in The Lord of the Rings interact with their environments. Drawing substantially on ecocritical theory, she argues that there are three main ways these groups relate to their setting: "power with, " "power from, " and "power over." Ents, Hobbits, and Elves have "power with" their environments. Dwarves and Men draw "power from" their place, interacting with the world symbolically or dialectically. Sauron, Saruman, and Orcs all stand as examples of narcissistic solipsism that attempts to exercise "power over" the environment. Jeffers further considers how wanderers in Middle-Earth interact with the world in light of these three categories and examines how these relationships reflect Tolkien's own moral paradigm. Arda Inhabited responds to environmental critics such as Neil Evernden and Christopher Manes, as well as to other touchstones of postmodern thought such as Hegel, DeSaussure, Adorno, and Deleuze and Guattari. It blends their ideas with the analyses of Tolkien scholars such as Patrick Curry, Verlyn Flieger, and Tom Shippey and builds on the work of other scholars who have looked at environment and Tolkien such as Matthew Dickerson and Jonathan Evans. Arda Inhabited demonstrates how Tolkien studies enhances ecocriticism with a fresh examination of interconnection and environment, and ecocriticism enriches Tolkien studies with new ways of reading his work.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781606352014 20160617
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
211 p. 18 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)

11. El viaje de Frodo [2010]

Book
93 p.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 497 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 504 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
296 p. illus. 22 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
416 p. : fold. map ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
160 p. 22 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
447 p. : ill., map ; 17 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 482 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 455 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
346 p. ; 20 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

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