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Book
viii, 211 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: political roles for fish populations
  • The fishing empires of the Pacific: the Americans, the Japanese, and the Soviets
  • Islands and war
  • Manifest destiny and fishing
  • Tariffs
  • Industrialization
  • Treaties
  • Imperialism
  • Enclosure
  • Conclusions: updating the best available science.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
viii, 244 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
The history of aluminum takes in metallurgy, engineering, global business and politics and the advance of civilization itself. The earth's most abundant metal, aluminum remained largely inaccessible until after the Industrial Revolution. A precious commodity in 1850s, it later became a strategic resource: while steel won World War I, aluminum won World War II. A generation later, it would make space travel possible and the 1972 Pioneer spacecraft would carry a message from mankind to extraterrestrial life, engraved on an aluminum plate. Today aluminum-along with oil-is the natural resource driving geopolitics, and China has taken the lead in manufacture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780786499557 20170130
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xv, 143 pages, 20 pages of unnumbered plates : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Foreword by Francis French
  • Launch morning
  • Beginnings
  • Astronaut selection
  • Going back to Houston
  • After the fire
  • Liftoff
  • Rendezvous
  • The grandeur of earth
  • Return to earth
  • Splashdown
  • Home
  • After the flight
  • Afterword by Susie Eisele Black
  • Historical overview by Amy Shira Teitel.
In October 1968 Donn Eisele flew with fellow astronauts Walt Cunningham and Wally Schirra into Earth orbit in Apollo 7. The first manned mission in the Apollo program and the first manned flight after a fire during a launch pad test killed three astronauts in early 1967, Apollo 7 helped restart NASA's manned-spaceflight program. Known to many as a goofy, lighthearted prankster, Eisele worked his way from the U.S. Naval Academy to test pilot school and then into the select ranks of America's prestigious astronaut corps. He was originally on the crew of Apollo 1 before being replaced due to injury. After that crew died in a horrific fire, Eisele was on the crew selected to return Americans to space. Despite the success of Apollo 7, Eisele never flew in space again, as divorce and a testy crew commander led to the three astronauts being labeled as troublemakers. Unbeknownst to everyone, after his retirement as a technical assistant for manned spaceflight at NASA's Langley Research Center in 1972, Eisele wrote in detail about his years in the air force and his time in the Apollo program. Long after his death, Francis French discovered Eisele's unpublished memoir, and Susie Eisele Black (Donn's widow) allowed French access to her late husband's NASA files and personal effects. Readers can now experience an Apollo story they assumed would never be written as well as the story behind its discovery.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780803262836 20170117
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xv, 226 pages ; 24 cm
  • Preface Introduction: For Us, By Us: A Manifesto of Black SGL and Trans Health Jonathan Mathias Lassiter Chapter 1 The Forgotten Intersection: Black LGBTQ/GNC Youth in Juvenile Detention in the United States Amorie Robinson Chapter 2 Black Bisexual Women's Health in the United States: A Systematic Literature Review Jonathan Mathias Lassiter Chapter 3 Uses of the Interstitial as Power: Black, Bisexual Men Building Maroon Health H. Sharif "Herukhuti" Williams Chapter 4 Resistance as Resilience: How the Black Bisexual Community Keeps One Another Healthy Della V. Mosley, Roberto L. Abreu, and Candice Crowell Chapter 5 Narratives of Health among Black Trans Men: An Exploratory Intersectional Analysis Tonia C Poteat and Lourdes Dolores Follins Chapter 6 Balancing Act: Identity Management and Mental Health in Black LBT Women Siobhan Brooks Chapter 7 Rainbows or Ribbons? Queer Black Women Searching For a Place in the Cancer Sisterhood LaShaune P. Johnson and Jane A. McElroy Chapter 8 Status-Quo: Intersectionality Theory, Afro-Centric Paradigms, and Meeting the Healthcare Needs of Gay and Bisexual African American Men Dante' D. Bryant Chapter 9 Identity, Sexual Identity Disclosure, and HIV Risk in Black Sexual Minority Men: A Conceptual Overview Rahwa Haile, Mark B. Padilla, and Edith A. Parker Chapter 10 Shades of Black: A Psychotherapy Group for Black Men Who Have Sex with Men Tfawa T. Haynes and Sannisha K. Dale Chapter 11 Effective Strategies Used by African American Same Gender Loving Men in Promoting Health and Wellbeing Lawrence O. Bryant Chapter 12 Perceptions of Health: Self-Rated Health among Black LGB People Kasim Ortiz, Angelique Harris, Kenneth Maurice Pass, and Devon Tyrone Wade.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498535762 20170130
Black LGBT Health in the United States: The Intersection of Race, Gender, and Sexual Orientation focuses on the mental, physical, and spiritual aspects of health, and considers both risk and resiliency factors for the Black LGBT population. Contributors to this collection intimately understand the associations between health and intersectional anti-Black racism, heterosexism, homonegativity, biphobia, transphobia, and social class. This collection fills a gap in current scholarship by providing information about an array of health issues like cancer, juvenile incarceration, and depression that affect all subpopulations of Black LGBT people, especially Black bisexual-identified women, Black bisexual-identified men, and Black transgender men. This book is recommended for readers interested in psychology, health, gender studies, race studies, social work, and sociology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498535762 20170130
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
x, 291 pages ; 25 cm
  • Nothing that boy did
  • Boots on the porch
  • Growing up black in Chicago
  • Emmett in Chicago and "Little Mississippi"
  • Pistol-whipping at Christmas
  • The incident
  • On the third day
  • Mama made the earth tremble
  • Warring regiments of Mississippi
  • Black Monday
  • People we don't need around here any more
  • Fixed opinions
  • Mississippi underground
  • "There he is"
  • Every last Anglo-Saxon one of you
  • The verdict of the world
  • Protest politics
  • Killing Emmett Till
  • Epilogue: the children of Emmett Till.
In 2014, protesters ringed the White House, chanting, "How many black kids will you kill? Michael Brown, Emmett Till!" Why did demonstrators invoke the name of a black boy murdered six decades before?In 1955, white men in the Mississippi Delta lynched a fourteen-year-old from Chicago named Emmett Till. His murder was part of a wave of white terrorism in the wake of the 1954 Supreme Court decision that declared public school segregation unconstitutional. The national coalition organized to protest the Till lynching became the foundation of the modern civil rights movement. Only weeks later, Rosa Parks thought about young Emmett as she refused to move to the back of a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Five years later, the Emmett Till generation, forever marked by the vicious killing of a boy their own age, launched sit-in campaigns that turned the struggle into a mass movement. "I can hear the blood of Emmett Till as it calls from the ground, " shouted a black preacher in Albany, Georgia. But what actually happened to Emmett Till-not the icon of injustice but the flesh-and-blood boy? Part detective story, part political history, Timothy Tyson's The Blood of Emmett Till draws on a wealth of new evidence, including the only interview ever given by Carolyn Bryant, the white woman in whose name Till was killed. Tyson's gripping narrative upends what we thought we knew about the most notorious racial crime in American history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781476714868 20170306
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xii, 205 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
In 1961, the U.S. government established the first formalized provisions for intercountry adoption just as it was expanding America's involvement with Vietnam. Adoption became an increasingly important portal of entry into American society for Vietnamese and Amerasian children, raising questions about the United States' obligations to refugees and the nature of the family during an era of heightened anxiety about U.S. global interventions. Whether adopting or favoring the migration of multiracial individuals, Americans believed their norms and material comforts would salve the wounds of a divisive war. However, Vietnamese migrants challenged these efforts of reconciliation. As Allison Varzally details in this book, a desire to redeem defeat in Vietnam, faith in the nuclear family, and commitment to capitalism guided American efforts on behalf of Vietnamese youths. By tracing the stories of Vietnamese migrants, however, Varzally reveals that while many had accepted separations as a painful strategy for survival in the midst of war, most sought, and some eventually found, reunion with their kin. This book makes clear the role of adult adoptees in Vietnamese and American debates about the forms, privileges, and duties of families, and places Vietnamese children at the center of American and Vietnamese efforts to assign responsibility and find peace in the aftermath of conflict.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469630915 20170306
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xxiv, 252 pages : illustration ; 24 cm.
  • Foreword Patricia Arredondo Part I: Socio-Cultural Foundations 1. The Diverse Historical Roots of Today's Latino/as: Learning from our Past to Move into the Future 2. Skin Color Differences within Latino/as: Historical & Contemporary Implications of Colorism 3. The History of Latino/a in the United States: Journeys of Hope, Struggle, & Resilience Part II: Understanding Within Group Latino/a Differences 4. Socio-historical Construction of Latina/o Gender Ideologies: Integrating Indigenous and Contemporary Perspectives into Treatment 5. Adapting to a New Country: Models & Theories of Acculturation Applied to the Diverse Latino/a Population 6. Skin Color Matters: Towards a New Framework that Considers Racial and Ethnic Identity Development Among Latino/as Part III: Culturally Responsive and Racially Conscious Clinical Practice with Latino/as 7. Towards a Complex Understanding of Mental Health Service Utilization among Latino/as: Considering Context, Power, and Within Group Differences 8. Roots of Connectedness: Application of Latino/a Cultural Values in Mental Health Care 9. Culturally Responsive and Racially Conscious Mental Health Approaches with Latino/as Part IV: The Impact of Latino/a Psychology on Racially & Ethnically Diverse Students and Professionals 10. The Impact of Latino/a Psychology on Racially & Ethnically Diverse Students and Professionals.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138851535 20161108
Advancing work to effectively study, understand, and serve the fastest growing U.S. ethnic minority population, this volume explicitly emphasizes the racial and ethnic diversity within this heterogeneous cultural group. The focus is on the complex historical roots of contemporary Latino/as, their diversity in skin-color and physiognomy, racial identity, ethnic identity, gender differences, immigration patterns, and acculturation. The work highlights how the complexities inherent in the diverse Latino/a experience, as specified throughout the topics covered in this volume, become critical elements of culturally responsive and racially conscious mental health treatment approaches. By addressing the complexities, within-group differences, and racially heterogeneity characteristic of U.S. Latino/as, this volume makes a significant contribution to the literature related to mental health treatments and interventions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138851535 20161108
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xi, 219 pages : illustrations, map ; 23 cm
  • Setting the scene: a guide to this volume
  • Reporting, frequency, and correlates of disasters
  • Providing compensation to survivors of disasters
  • Hurricanes
  • Floods and their consequences
  • Tornadoes
  • Drought and other risks to agriculture
  • Wildfires
  • Geological and man-made disasters
  • Disasters and compensation systems.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xlii, 337 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), maps (chiefly color) ; 26 cm
  • Part I. The graphic history
  • Trinity
  • Crossroads
  • Nutmeg
  • Ranger
  • Doom town
  • Fallout
  • Boltzman
  • Smokey
  • Secrecy and history
  • Part II. Primary documents
  • Trinity
  • Crossroads
  • Nutmeg
  • Ranger
  • Doom towns
  • Fallout
  • Boltzman
  • Smokey
  • Secrecy and history
  • Part III. Historical context
  • The world at Trinity
  • What is a Cold War?
  • Dividing the globe
  • Tipping points and atomic escalation
  • Eisenhower's new look
  • Atomic west
  • Picturing wastelands
  • Part IV. The questions
  • Contingency
  • Oral history
  • DOE opennet
  • Primary documents
  • Images as evidence
  • Making graphic history.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xi, 220 pages ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Close Combat Privatization 2. The Armed Contractor Phenomenon: A Contemporary Debate with a Long History 3. Mercenaries, Soldiers, and Armed Contractors: An Explication 4. Armed Military Privatization and the Commodification of Force 5. The Belligerent Equality of Armed Contractors? 6. The Challenge of Military Privatization to the Military Profession 7. The "Second Contractor War" and the Future of Armed Contractors.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472464439 20170130
This book explores the ethical implications of using armed contractors, taking a consequentialist approach to this multidisciplinary debate. While privatization is not a new concept for the US military, the public debate on military privatization is limited to legal, financial, and pragmatic concerns. A critical assessment of the ethical dimensions of military privatization in general is missing. More specifically, in light of the increased reliance upon armed contractors, it must be asked whether it is morally permissible for governments to employ them at all. To this end, this book explores four areas that highlight the ethical implications of using armed contractors: how armed contractors are distinct from soldiers and mercenaries; the commodification of force; the belligerent equality of combatants; and the impact of armed contractors on the professional military. While some take an absolutist position, wanting to bar the use of private military altogether, this book reveals how these absolutist arguments are problematic and highlights that there are circumstances where turning to private force may be the only option. Recognising that outsourcing force will continue, this book thus proposes some changes to account for the problems of commodification, belligerent equality, and the challenge to the military profession. This book will be of interest to students of private security, military studies, ethics, security studies, and IR in general.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472464439 20170130
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xxiv, 227 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: Human culture and space heritage
  • Cultural context of Apollo culture
  • Early propulsion development sites and the risks of space flight
  • Rocket testing sites
  • Facilities to protect human life and safety
  • Astronaut training sites
  • Legal frameworks for historic preservation
  • Preservation of space heritage using models from the sea and antarctica
  • Threats to space heritage sites
  • Preservation works: success stories in space history
  • Looking ahead.
This book considers the archaeology of the facilities and sites on Earth that helped facilitate the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xiv, 479 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • List of Illustrations ix Acknowledgments xi Part I: Duplicity and the Evolution of American Capitalism Chapter One: The Enduring Dilemmas of Antifraud Regulation 3 Chapter Two: The Shape-Shifting, Never-Changing World of Fraud 14 Part II: A Nineteenth-Century World of Caveat Emptor(1810s to 1880s) Chapter Three: The Porousness of the Law 43 Chapter Four: Channels of Exposure 75 Part III: Professionalization, Moralism, and the Elite Assault on Deception (1860s to 1930s) Chapter Five: The Beginnings of a Modern Administrative State 107 Chapter Six: Innovation, Moral Economy, and the Postmaster General's Peace 143 Chapter Seven: The Businessmen's War to End All Fraud 174 Chapter Eight: Quandaries of Procedural Justice 208 Part IV: The Call for Investor and Consumer Protection (1930s to 1970s) Chapter Nine: Moving toward Caveat Venditor 245 Chapter Ten: Consumerism and the Reorientation of Antifraud Policy 285 Chapter Eleven: The Promise and Limits of the Antifraud State 316 Part V: The Market Strikes Back (1970s to 2010s) Chapter Twelve: Neoliberalism and the Rediscovery of Business Fraud 353 List of Abbreviations 385 Notes 387 Index 471.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691164557 20170206
The United States has always proved an inviting home for boosters, sharp dealers, and outright swindlers. Worship of entrepreneurial freedom has complicated the task of distinguishing aggressive salesmanship from unacceptable deceit, especially on the frontiers of innovation. At the same time, competitive pressures have often nudged respectable firms to embrace deception. As a result, fraud has been a key feature of American business since its beginnings. In this sweeping narrative, Edward Balleisen traces the history of fraud in America--and the evolving efforts to combat it--from the age of P. T. Barnum through the eras of Charles Ponzi and Bernie Madoff. Starting with an early nineteenth-century American legal world of "buyer beware, " this unprecedented account describes the slow, piecemeal construction of modern regulatory institutions to protect consumers and investors, from the Gilded Age through the New Deal and the Great Society. It concludes with the more recent era of deregulation, which has brought with it a spate of costly frauds, including the savings and loan crisis, corporate accounting scandals, and the recent mortgage-marketing debacle. By tracing how Americans have struggled to foster a vibrant economy without enabling a corrosive level of fraud, this book reminds us that American capitalism rests on an uneasy foundation of social trust.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691164557 20170206
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
293 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction : political ecologies of bioterror
  • "Smallpox is dead" : the public health campaign to (almost) eradicate a species
  • Microbes for war and peace : on the military origins of containment
  • The wild microbiological west : fighting ticks and weighing risks
  • Agents of care : bioterrorism preparedness at the CDC
  • Simulation science : securing the future
  • Bioterror borderlands : of nature and nation
  • Conclusion: "freaked out yet?".
The United States government has spent billions of dollars to prepare the nation for bioterrorism despite the extremely rare occurrence of biological attacks in modern American history. Germ Wars argues that bioterrorism has emerged as a prominent fear in the modern age, arising with the production of new forms of microbial nature and the changing practices of warfare. In the last century, revolutions in biological science have made visible a vast microscopic world, and in this same era we have watched the rise of a global war on terror. Germ Wars demonstrates that these movements did not occur separately but are instead deeply entwined-new scientific knowledge of microbes makes possible new mechanisms of war. Whether to eliminate disease or create weapons, the work to harness and control germs and the history of these endeavors provide an important opportunity for investigating how biological natures shape modern life. Germ Wars aims to convince students and scholars as well as policymakers and activists that the ways in which bioterrorism has been produced have consequences for how people live in this world of unspecifiable risks.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520292772 20170321
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xvi, 186 pages ; 24 cm
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xxii, 369 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Idiots in America
  • Edward Seguin and the irony of physiological education
  • The burden of the feebleminded
  • Living and working in the institution, 1890-1920
  • The menace of the feebleminded
  • Sterilization, parole, and routinization
  • Remaking of mental retardation : of wars, angels, parents, and politicians
  • Intellectual disability and the dilemma of doubt
  • Epilogue on suffering fools gladly.
Pity, disgust, fear, cure, and prevention-all are words that Americans have used to make sense of what today we call intellectual disability. Inventing the Feeble Mind explores the history of this disability from its several identifications over the past 200 years: idiocy, imbecility, feeblemindedness, mental defect, mental deficiency, mental retardation, and most recently intellectual disability. Using institutional records, private correspondence, personal memories, and rare photographs, James Trent argues that the economic vulnerability of intellectually disabled people (and often their families), more than the claims made for their intellectual and social limitations, has shaped meaning, services, and policies in United States history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199396184 20170213
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xxi, 226 pages : illustrations, maps ; 22 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
x, 270 pages ; 24 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
213 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Misunderstanding Terrorism provides a striking reassessment of the scope and nature of the global neo-jihadi threat to the West. The post-9/11 decade experienced the emergence of new forms of political violence and new terrorist actors. More recently, Marc Sageman's understanding of how and why people have adopted fundamentalist ideologies and terrorist methods has evolved. Author of the classic Understanding Terror Networks, Sageman has become only more critical of the U.S. government's approach to the problem. He argues that U.S. society has been transformed for the worse by an extreme overreaction to a limited threat-limited, he insists, despite spectacular recent incidents, which he takes fully into account. Indeed, his discussion of just how limited the threat is marks a major contribution to the discussion and debate over the best way to a measured and much more effective response.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812248890 20170117
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xiii, 382 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
"In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a major transformation was occurring in many spheres of society: people with every sort of disability were increasingly being marginalized, excluded, and incarcerated. Disabled but still productive factory workers were being fired, and developmentally disabled individuals who had previously contributed domestic or agricultural labor in homes or on farms were being sent to institutions and poorhouses. [The author] pinpoints the origins and ramifications of this sea-change in American society, exploring the ways that public policy removed the disabled from the category of "deserving" recipients of public assistance, transforming them into a group requiring rehabilitation in order to achieve "self-care" and "self-support." By tracing the experiences of advocates, program innovators, and disabled people caught up in this epochal transition, Rose ... integrates disability history and labor history to show how disabled people and their families were relegated to poverty and second-class economic and social citizenship, with vast consequences for debates about disability, poverty, and welfare in the century to come"-- Provided by publisher.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xi, 336 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • A profession born in war
  • Trials on the frontier and in Mexico
  • The first upheaval
  • The Civil War's legacy
  • Between old and new
  • The second upheaval
  • Old soldiers in a new army
  • The Great War.
The U.S. Army has always regarded preparing for war as its peacetime role, but how it fulfilled that duty has changed dramatically over time. J. P. Clark traces the evolution of the Army between the War of 1812 and World War I, showing how differing personal experiences of war and peace among successive generations of professional soldiers left their mark upon the Army and its ways.Nineteenth-century officers believed that generalship and battlefield command were more a matter of innate ability than anything institutions could teach. They saw no benefit in conceptual preparation beyond mastering technical skills like engineering and gunnery. Thus, preparations for war were largely confined to maintaining equipment and fortifications and instilling discipline in the enlisted ranks through parade ground drill. By World War I, however, Progressive Era concepts of professionalism had infiltrated the Army. Younger officers took for granted that war s complexity required them to be trained to think and act alike a notion that would have offended earlier generations. Preparing for War concludes by demonstrating how these new notions set the conditions for many of the successes and some of the failures of General Pershing s American Expeditionary Forces.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674545731 20161228
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)