Book
180 p.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xiv, 157 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • 1. Introduction to the Sustainable Built Environment 2. Sustainable Procurement 3. Cost Modelling for Sustainability 4. Sustainable Building Process 5. Sustainable Buildings 6. Low and Zero Carbon Technologies in Buildings 7. Sustainability in Utilities: Water Efficient Sustainable Buildings 8. Environmental Law for the Built Environment and Environmental Impact Assessment 9. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780230314443 20160619
The text adopts an interdisciplinary approach to address the huge challenges in creating a sustainable built environment. In a broad survey of critical issues it assesses procurement, cost modelling and management, sustainable buildings, low and zero carbon technologies, sustainability in utilities, and the law.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780230314443 20160619
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
284 p. : col. ill. ; 27 cm
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xii, 162 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • PrefaceChapter 1: Is the earth sustainable?1.Changes from which the earth recovers, and changes from which the earth does not2. Mechanisms for recovery3. A massive intervention by humanity into the biosphere4. The flow of materials resulting from "making things"5. What happens if we continue with "business as usual?"Chapter 2: Knowing energy1. Energy is conserved2. What is energy used for?3. Energy degrades4. Improving efficiencyChapter 3: The limit of energy efficiency1. The elementary steps of human activities2. The energy of elementary steps3. The energy of human activitiesChapter 4: Energy conservation in daily life1. The automobile2. Homes and offices3. Power plantsChapter 5: Making things and recycling things1. The theory of recycling2. Recycling that is also energy conservation3. Is it bad to burn waste paper and plastic?Chapter 6: Introduction of renewable energy1. Could intensification of nuclear power be the answer?2. Sunlight3. Hydropower and wind power4. Geothermal and tidesChapter 7: How to make a sustainable earth1. The significance of the Kyoto Protocol2. Vision 2050: a new road to a sustainable earth3. A concrete image for Vision 2050 (1) A three-fold increase in energy use efficiency (2) Construction of a material recycling system (3) Development of renewable energyChapter 8: How will technology and society work together?1. Forming a total infrastructure for circulating materials in society2. Making the market work for sustainability3. Projects for Vision 20504. Rebuilding the relationship between technology and societyPostscript.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9784431094302 20160528
Hiroshi Komiyama's "Vision 2050" is a plan for paving a road to global sustainability. It lays out a path to a sustainable future for humanity that could realistically be achieved by 2050 through the application of science and technology. A prominent Japanese academic and leader in global sustainability, Komiyama draws upon realistic assumptions and solid scientific concepts to create a vision that makes the living standards enjoyed by developed countries today possible for all people by 2050."Vision 2050" is built upon three fundamental principles - increased energy efficiency, recycling, and development of renewable energy sources - and the book argues for the technological potential of all three. Specifically, Komiyama envisions a three-fold increase in overall energy efficiency and a doubling of renewable energy resources by 2050. "Vision 2050: Roadmap for a Sustainable Earth" is written to address the concerned citizen as well as to inspire an exchange of ideas among experts, policy makers, industrial leaders, and the general public.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9784431094302 20160528
dx.doi.org SpringerLink
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
184 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
373 p. : col. ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Part I The world of materials 1 Material wealth and health 2 Scale, uncertainty and estimation 3 Our uses of steel and aluminium 4 Metal journeys 5 Energy and emissions 6 Where does the money go? Part II With one eye open 7 Energy efficiency 8 Opportunities for capturing heat 9 Novel process routes 10 Carbon sequestration 11 Future energy use and emissions Part III With both eyes open 12 Using less metal by design 13 Reducing yield losses 14 Diverting manufacturing scrap 15 Re-using metal components 16 Longer life products 17 Reducing final demand 18 Options for change 19 Future energy use and emissions Part IV Other materials 20 Cement 287 21 Plastic 301 22 Paper 313 Part V Creating a sustainable material future 23 Business activity evaluation 24 The influence of policy 25 The actions of individuals References Index Acknowledgements.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781906860059 20160608
The world target is to reduce industry's carbon emissions by 50% by 2050. However, projections are that world demand for materials will DOUBLE by 2050, so to meet our emissions target, we have to achieve a 4-fold reduction in emissions per unit of material used. The book presents a vision for change, backed by comprehensive real life experience. The book is based on scientific detail. But it's practical, not pie in the sky: everything in the book is backed by evidence and commercial experience. The solutions presented here are ahead of the game now. By providing an evidence-based vision of change, the book can play a significant role in influencing our future. The book is written for a popular audience as well as specialists, and is beautifully produced with full colour throughout. Professional readers it will appeal to include: designers; engineers; operations, technical, and business managers; marketeers; traders; government and NGO officials associated with business, climate, energy, environment, waste, trade and financing. The book is relevant to a wide range of industries: energy industry; the steel and aluminium industries; mining; construction; consulting; manufacturing; architecture. For readers who don't believe that carbon emissions matter, the same arguments apply to energy saving: this book is not about climate change -- it's about using materials wisely, and getting more for less.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781906860059 20160608
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xxi, 171 p. : ill. ; 25 cm
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
253 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
299 p. : ill. (some col.), col. map ; 30 cm. + 1 addendum (13 p.).
Increased public awareness regarding environmental issues is driving change in the construction sector. Building sustainable homes requires us to minimise environmental impacts in addition to carbon dioxide emissions such as water use, waste generated and materials for building.The Government's Code for Sustainable Homes is a national environmental assessment method for rating and clarifying the performance of new homes in key areas such as carbon dioxide emissions and water use. The Code will become the single national standard for the design and construction of sustainable homes, and will drive continuous improvement in home building practice. A Code rating and certificate will be mandatory for all new build homes from 1 May 2008.This "Code for Sustainable Homes: Technical Guide" sets out the requirements for the Code, and the process for achieving a Code assessment. It aims to make gaining a Code assessment as simple, transparent and rigorous as possible, inspiring confidence in Code assessors, home builders, product manufacturers and consumers.Written by the Building Research Establishment (BRE), the "Code for Sustainable Homes: Technical Guide" offers invaluable advice on how to achieve a good Code rating in the nine measurable categories: Energy and emissions; water; materials; surface water run-off; waste; pollution; health and wellbeing; and management and ecology. "The Technical Guide" provides insights into what the assessor will be looking for, including lists of issues associated with the building process for which performance issues can be measured. "The Technical Guide" provides a comprehensive list of definitions relevant to each section of the Code and is an essential reference for anyone involved in the design and construction of new build homes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781859463130 20160527
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
299 p. : ill. ; 30 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xvii, 265 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
  • Notes on Editors x Notes on Contributors xi Foreword xiv Acknowledgements xvi Chapter 1 Building Resilience in Urban Settlements Through Green Roof Retrofit 1 1.0 Introduction 1 1.1 Background and Context: Green Infrastructure 2 1.1.1 Green Roofs 4 1.2 Extensive and Intensive Systems 5 1.3 Valuing Green Infrastructure and Wider Economic Benefits 5 1.4 Measures of Greenness in Cities and the Growing Market for Green Roofs 7 1.5 A Growing Global Market for Green Roofs 7 1.6 Overview of the Structure of the Book 8 1.7 Conclusion 12 References 12 Chapter 2 Technical and Engineering Issues in Green Roof Retrofit 14 2.0 Introduction 14 2.1 Technical and Engineering Considerations 15 2.2 Roof Structure and Covering Typologies 15 2.2.1 Pitched Roof Structures 15 2.2.2 Pitched Roof Coverings 16 2.2.3 Flat Roof Structures 18 2.2.4 Flat Roof Coverings 19 2.2.5 Other Roof Designs 20 2.2.6 Green Roof Modular Systems 20 2.3 Available Space 21 2.4 Structural Capacity 21 2.5 Waterproof Membranes and Insulation 23 2.6 Drainage 24 2.7 Heritage 24 2.8 Green Roof Access 24 2.8.1 Access for Maintenance 25 2.8.2 Temporary or Permanent Access Strategies 25 2.8.3 Maintenance Frequency 26 2.9 Other Issues 26 2.10 How to Determine Which Green Roof Type is Best Suited to Different Structures 26 2.11 Illustrative Case Studies 27 2.11.1 Australia Surry Hills Library and Beare Park, Sydney 27 2.11.2 Brazil 30 2.11.3 1214 Queen St West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 33 2.11.4 107 Cheapside, London, UK 34 2.12 Conclusions 35 References 36 Chapter 3 Green Roof Retrofit and the Urban Heat Island 37 3.0 Introduction 37 3.1 Defining the Urban Heat Island 37 3.1.1 UHI Impacts on Environment, Society and Economy 39 3.2 Microclimatic Effects of Rooftop Greening 40 3.3 Green Roof Cooling Mechanisms 43 3.4 Green Roof Retrofit for UHI Mitigation Defining the Boundaries 45 3.4.1 Roof Availability and Suitability 45 3.4.2 Design Considerations Intensive Versus Extensive 46 3.5 Green Roof Retrofit for UHI Mitigation Developing the Model 47 3.5.1 Overview of Methods 47 3.5.2 Modelling Roof Availability and Suitability 48 3.5.3 Modelling Thermal Performance 49 3.6 Model Implementation Evaluating Sydney s Surface and Canopy ]Layer Heat Islands 50 3.7 Green Roof Retrofit for UHI Mitigation Model Implementation 55 3.8 Conclusions Where to from Here? 57 3.8.1 Limitations of the Research and Opportunities for Further Work 58 References 59 Chapter 4 Thermal Performance of Green Roof Retrofit 62 4.0 Introduction 62 4.1 Green Roof Retrofit and Thermal Performance 63 4.2 Research Methodology 67 4.3 Case study: Rio de Janeiro and Sydney 68 4.3.1 Rio de Janeiro Case Study 69 4.3.2 Sydney Case Study 74 4.3.3 Evaluation of Rio de Janeiro and Sydney Cases 78 4.4 Conclusions 80 References 82 Chapter 5 Stormwater Attenuation and Green Roof Retrofit 85 5.0 Introduction 85 5.1 The Problem of Pluvial Flooding 86 5.2 Specifications for Stormwater Roofs and Issues for Retrofit 88 5.2.1 Technical and Physical Issues in Retrofit 88 5.2.2 Estimating Runoff Reduction 89 5.3 Modelling for City ]Scale Stormwater Attenuation 90 5.3.1 Melbourne, Australia 92 5.3.2 Newcastle ]upon ]Tyne, UK CBD Database 95 5.3.3 Melbourne and Newcastle Runoff Estimation 97 5.4 Assessment of Retrofit at a Building Scale 99 5.4.1 Portland Ecoroof Programme 101 5.5 Conclusions Where to Next? 102 References 103 Chapter 6 Biodiversity and Green Roof Retrofit 106 6.0 Introduction 106 6.1 What is Biodiversity? 108 6.2 Green Roofs for Vertebrate Conservation 109 6.3 Green Roofs for Invertebrate Conservation 110 6.4 Conclusions 112 6.4.1 Designing Biodiverse Green Roofs 113 References 115 Chapter 7 Planting Choices for Retrofitted Green Roofs 118 7.0 Introduction 118 7.1 Ecosystem Services Delivery By Green Roofs: The Importance of Plant Choice 120 7.2 Plant Species Choice and Building Cooling/Insulation 120 7.2.1 Plants and Cooling Basic Principles 120 7.2.2 Plant Species Choice and Summer ]Time Surface Cooling 123 7.2.3 Plant Species Choice and Winter ]Time Insulation 129 7.3 Plant Species Choice and Stormwater Management 130 7.4 Greater Plant Variety can Enhance Urban Biodiversity 133 7.5 Plant Choices and Particle Pollution Mitigation 134 7.6 New Plant Choices and Adaptation of Current Green Roof Systems 134 7.7 Conclusions and Future Work 135 References 136 Chapter 8 Green Roof Retrofitting and Conservation of Endangered Flora 140 8.0 Introduction 140 8.1 Biodiversity Conservation a Strategic Overview 141 8.2 A Review of Green Roofs in Habitat Conservation 143 8.3 Knowledge Gaps and Further Research 146 8.3.1 A Research Programme for Conserving Endangered Species on Green Roofs 147 8.3.2 The Endangered Community of the Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub 147 8.4 A Model Research Design for Species Conservation 149 8.4.1 Extensive or Intensive Roofs? 149 8.4.2 Research Objectives 150 8.4.3 Guiding Principles for ESBS Regeneration 152 8.4.4 Preparatory Steps 152 8.4.5 Monitoring 153 8.4.6 Expected Outcomes 153 8.5 Conclusions 154 References 154 Chapter 9 Urban Food Production on Retrofitted Rooftops 158 9.0 Introduction 158 9.1 Green Roof Retrofit and Urban Food Production 159 9.2 Stakeholders and Urban Food Production 161 9.3 Contamination and Air ]Quality Issues 162 9.3.1 Types of Pollutant 163 9.3.2 Most Urban Soils are Contaminated 164 9.3.3 Do Contaminants Accumulate in Urban Crops? 165 9.3.4 Mitigating Urban Crop Contamination 167 9.3.5 Urban Gardens and Air Quality 169 9.4 The Research Design and Methodology 170 9.4.1 Case Studies 171 9.4.2 Gumal Student Housing 171 9.4.3 Science Roof 173 9.4.4 Vertical Gardens 175 9.4.5 Results and Interpretation 176 9.4.6 Findings 180 9.5 The Carbon Footprint of Food Grown on Demonstration Beds 180 9.6 Potential Reductions in Carbon Footprint 181 9.7 Conclusions 183 References 183 Chapter 10 Social Aspects of Institutional Rooftop Gardens 189 10.0 Introduction and Objectives 189 10.1 Social Aspects, Productivity and Sustainability Potential of Rooftop Gardens 190 10.2 Methodology 193 10.2.1 Comparative Analysis of Eight University Rooftop Garden Case Studies 195 10.2.2 Semi ]Structured Interviews with UTS Roof Gardening Club 195 10.2.3 107 Projects Rooftop Garden: A Sensory Ethnography 196 10.3 Main Findings 197 10.3.1 Comparative Analysis of Eight Rooftop Gardens in Universities 197 10.3.2 Qualitative Analysis of UTS Roof Gardening Club Semi ]Structured Interviews 198 10.3.3 107 Projects Rooftop Garden, Sydney 205 10.3.4 St Canice Kitchen Garden, Kings Cross, Sydney 208 10.4 Recommendations, Discussions and Conclusions 209 Acknowledgement 212 References 212 Chapter 11 Cool Roof Retrofits as an Alternative to Green Roofs 216 11.0 Introduction 216 11.1 What is a Cool Roof? 216 11.2 Background How does a Cool Roof Work? 217 11.3 Cool Roof Studies and Measurements 217 11.4 The Experiments 218 11.4.1 Results 219 11.4.2 Other Residential Building Typologies 228 11.4.3 Impact of CRP on PV Energy Generation 231 11.5 Conclusions 232 11.5.1 Negative Impacts of Cool Roofs 232 11.5.2 Green Roofs Versus Cool Roofs 232 11.5.3 Cool Roofs and Retrofits 233 11.5.4 Barriers and Stakeholders 233 Acknowledgements 233 References 234 Chapter 12 Looking to the Future 235 12.0 Introduction 235 12.1 City ]level Actions: Basel and Paris 235 12.2 City ]level Actions: Requirements or Inducements? 237 12.3 Tools and Information Sources 240 12.4 Green Roofs: The Big Picture of GI and Future Developments 241 12.5 Recognising the Multiple Benefits of Green Roof Retrofit 243 12.6 Overall Conclusions 244 References 245 Appendices 247 Appendix 1: A Checklist for Appraising the Suitability of an Existing Roof for Green Roof Retrofit 247 Appendix 2: Checklist for Designers of Biodiverse Green Roofs 250 Appendix 3: Tools, Information Sources and Mapping/GIS for Green Roofs Some Examples 253 Index 257.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119055570 20161010
A deep understanding of the implications of green roof retrofit is required amongst students and practitioners to make the decisions and take the actions needed to mitigate climate changes. Green Roof Retrofit: building urban resilience illustrates the processes undertaken to develop this new knowledge and thereby embed a deeper level of understanding in readers.Illustrative case studies and exemplars are drawn from countries outside of the core researched areas to demonstrate the application of the knowledge more broadly. Examples are used from the Americas (North and South and Canada), Oceania, Asia and other European countries.The book describes the multiple criteria which inform decision making and how this provides a way forward for making better decisions about green roof retrofit in different countries and climates.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119055570 20161010
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xvii, 229 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Preface 1. Passions of Power and the "Tryst with Destiny" 2. Modernity, Cornucopianism and the Megamachine 3. The Evolution of India's Economic Development Discourse: Independence to 1985 4. The Embrace of Nuclear Power and The Development-Energy Treadmill In India 5. The Advance of Economic Liberalization in India: 1985 to Present 6. Political Economy of Nuclear Power in India 7. Beyond Cornucopianism and the Megamachine Organization 8. Epilogue.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415629164 20160615
Nuclear power is often characterized as a "green technology." Technologies are rarely, if ever, socially isolated artefacts. Instead, they materially represent an embodiment of values and priorities. Nuclear power is no different. It is a product of a particular political economy and the question is whether that political economy can helpfully engage with the challenge of addressing the environmental crisis on a finite, inequitable and shared planet. For developing countries like India, who are presently making infrastructure investments which will have long legacies, it is imperative that these investments wrestle with such questions and prove themselves capable of sufficiency, greater equality and inclusiveness. This book offers a critique of civilian nuclear power as a green energy strategy for India and develops and proposes an alternative "synergy for sustainability." It situates nuclear power as a socio-technical infrastructure embodying a particular development discourse and practice of energy and economic development. The book reveals the political economy of this arrangement and examines the latter's ability to respond to the environmental crisis. Manu V. Mathai argues that the existing overwhelmingly growth-focused, highly technology-centric approach for organizing economic activity is unsustainable and needs to be reformed. Within this imperative for change, nuclear power in India is found to be and is characterized as an "authoritarian technology." Based on this political economy critique the book proposes an alternative, a synergy of ideas from the fields of development economics, energy planning and science, technology and society studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415629164 20160615
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
312 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
29 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xxxiv, 441 p. : ill. ; 31 cm. + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.)
  • Foreword by Nigel Cross and Bjorn Stigson * Statement by the MMSD Assurance Group * Statement by the MMSD Sponsors Group * Executive Summary * Introduction * Part 1: A framework for change - The Minerals Sector and Sustainable Development. Part II: Current Trends and Actors - Producing and Selling Minerals * a Profile of the Minerals Sector * The Need for and Availability of Minerals * Case Studies on Minerals. Part III: Challenges - Viability of the Minerals Industry * The Control, Use and Management of Land * Minerals and Economic Development * Local Communities and Mines * Mining, Minerals and the Environment * An Integrated Approach to Using Minerals * Access to Information * Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining * Roles, Responsibilities and Instruments of Change. Part IV: Responses and Recommendations - Regional Perspectives * Agenda for Change * Appendices: Appendix.1. The MMSD Project * Appendix 2. MMSD Consultation Activities * Acronyms and Abbreviations Bibliography * Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781853839078 20160528
Mining is fundamental to our lives - we wear and travel in; build, cook and communicate with its products daily. However, it is also one of the most environmentally damaging industries. This study examines how such a huge and multi-facetted industry can be made sustainable, minimizing its harmful impacts and maximizing its social and economic contribution. It analyses the different needs and risks of those affected, as well as issues of supply and demand of minerals throughout the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781853839078 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
107 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
viii, 81 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xvi, 238 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Appropriate "green" technologies are sometimes regarded as a second-rate solution but this volume challenges this concept by presenting real-life examples of successful alternatives to demonstrate appropriate technological stories from Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America. All of the 54 stories included in this booklet have been produced as a result of personal experience from somewhere in the world. Subjects covered in this series include success stories from agriculture, agro-processing, enterprize, energy, building and shelter, water and sanitation. The books offer a range of solutions for development professionals, NGOs, entrepreneurs and individuals who want to improve people's livelihoods and the environment. They give practical advice and demonstrate a wide range of "how to" technologies including income generating schemes in cities like Delhi and Dharka, transport initiatives in Kathmandu and Copenhagen and energy-saving projects in Addis Ababe and Beijing. This book looks at innovations in agriculture, food processing, water and sanitation and small business development. The material for this book has been taken from the first "Hands On" series of short video film prepared by the Television Trust for the Environment.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781853395154 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
viii, 315 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Preface. Sustainable Use of Electricity-- J.S. Norgard. Global Energy Efficiency and Technologies to Further Its Progress-- A. Rosenfeld, et al. An Introduction to Integrated Resource Planning-- A.T. de Almeida, et al. Polish Efficient Lighting Project - The DSM Pilot Experiment-- A. Gula, et al. Efficient Use and Generation of Electricity in Hungary-- G. Sigmond. Electricity Saving Policies in Denmark-- A. Gydesen. Lighting Efficiency in Russia and CIS-- J.B. Aizenberg. Energy-Efficient Information and Communication Technologies in Europe-- J. Roturier, A. Anglade. Energy-Efficient Motor and Drives-- A.T. de Almeida, P. Fonseca. Low Electricity Houses - A Real Case: The Passive House in Darmstadt-Kranichstein-- W. Feist, W. Ebel. Efficient Use of Energy at Universities-- J. Roturier, P. Faucher. Least-Cost Planning on Electricity-- S. Thomas. Appliance Energy Labelling and Standards in Europe-- P. Waide. Efficient Technology and Appropriate Life-Styles-- J.S. Norgard. Subject Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780792352174 20160528
The rather young field of research into electricity savings is attracting increasing attention since low electricity consumption is a vital component of environmentally sustainable development. The potential benefits from using less electricity, without sacrificing quality of life, are immense, as the book shows with case studies from Eastern and Western Europe and the USA. Saving electricity means that the expense of constructing scores of power plants can be saved, and that their economic and environmental impact will vanish. This book can be read with profit by any graduate. It is suitable as a reference work for Master's and Doctoral students, as well as for others working on environmental issues in general and electricity savings in particular.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780792352174 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xx, 223 p. : maps ; 25 cm.
  • Sweet potato production systems in the Dominican Republic: a comparison of two agroecological zones-- classification and spatial distribution of rice-based agroecosystems in West Africa-- spatial projection of socioeconomic data using geographic information systems: results from a Kenya study in the strategic implementation of a livestock disease control intervention-- farmers' organization, research and diffusion of technology-- technological change in wheat production in Pakistan: markets behaviour and income dynamics-- the relative value of cereal straw fodder in the semiarid tropics of India: implications for cereal breeding programmes at ICRISAT-- scope for improvement of small ruminant production in the Sahel-- part contents.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780851988061 20160528
Agricultural technologies reflect the characteristics not only of environments but also of the people who devise and use them. The social science perspectives of variability in space and time can be used to generate comparative data which aid understanding of these issues. The studies reported in this book cross spatial and temporal boundaries and should interest social scientists concerned with agricultural development.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780851988061 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)

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