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Book
viii, 276 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
255 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
ix, 268 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgements-- Translator's Note-- Introduction: Ways to language-- PART I: WHICH CHILDREN ARE WE TALKING ABOUT?-- 1. Communication disorders and language disorders: rough definitions-- 2. Communication disorder and its signs-- 3. Engagement with language-- PART II: PRINCIPLES OF THEORY-- 4. Joint attention-- 5. From communication to language-- PART III: SOME CASES-- 6. Ahlem, or painful transparency-- 7. Lanny, or the silence of the mad child-- 8. Louis, or shared monologue-- 9. Simon and the magic dictation-- 10. Charles, or paradoxical communication-- PART IV: THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS-- 11. Language and symbolization-- 12. From sense to sound and back again-- 13. Cognitive implications-- 14. Why do some children not communicate?-- CONCLUSION.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195175028 20160528
Communication and language disorders are often considered from one particular point of view - either psychological or neurological. Danon-Boileau argues that this is a serious mistake. He emphasizes that a child's trouble can stem from a variety of causes: neurological problems similar to those of aphasia, cognitive impairments, and psychological disorders, and, thus, the interaction of these elements needs to be taken into account. In precise case studies, Danon-Boileau describes the situations he has confronted and traces the causes of changes in the child when they happen. Combining linguistic, cognitive, and psycho-analytic approaches, "Children without Language" provides a unique perspective on speech and communication disorders in children and will be an essential volume for speech therapists, developmental psychologists, linguistics scholars and anyone wishing to reflect seriously on why we speak and how communication occurs.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195175028 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
232 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xviii, 369 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
316 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xii, 275 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • 1. The Development of Deaf Children: Issues and Orientations-- 2. The Nature and Scope of Deafness-- 3. The Early Years: The Social-Emotional Context of Development-- 4. Social and Personality Development During the School Years-- 5. Foundations of Language Development in Deaf Children-- 6. Language Acquisition-- 7. Intelligence and Cognitive Development-- 8. Short-Term Memory: The Development of Memory Coding-- 9. Long-Term Memory: Codes, Organization, and Strategies-- 10. Creativity and Flexibility: The Myth(?) of Concreteness-- 11. Learning to Read and Write-- 12. The Development of Deaf Children: Toward an Integrated View.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195115758 20160528
The majority of young deaf children, especially those with non-signing parents, are reared in language-impoverished environments. This can cause their social and cognitive development to differ markedly from hearing children. The Psychological Development of Deaf Children details those potential differences, paying special attention to how the psychological development of deaf children is affected by their interpersonal communication with parents, peers, and teachers. This careful and balanced consideration of existing evidence and research provides a new psychological perspective on deaf children and deafness.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195115758 20160528
This volume provides the first comprehensive examination of deaf children's development. In examining its role from the pre-natal period to adulthood, deafness becomes a potential determiner of differences in social and cognitive functioning. Special attention is given to the role of interpersonal communication between deaf children and their parents, peers, and teachers. The majority of deaf children (those with hearing parents) have relatively little linguistic communication with their parents, but the apparent effects of this situation go far beyond language. Deaf children may develop social and cognitive strategies for dealing with the world that differ from those developed by hearing children. The existence of such differences need not imply that deaf children are any less capable than hearing peers, but a variety of studies have revealed that they lag behind hearing age-mates in several areas. A careful and balanced consideration of existing evidence concerning deafness and development provides a new psychological perspective on deaf children and deafness in light of recent findings concerning manual communication, parent-child interactions, and intellectual and academic assessments of hearing impaired children. The result is an integrated understanding of social, language, and cognitive development as they are affected by childhood deafness and by each other. In this context, several popular assumptions about deaf children - some in their favour, some against - are found to lack any basis in fact, and several new discoveries are evident.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195068993 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
232 p.
  • Chapter 1 - The physiology and function of the normal and damaged cochlea-- Chapter 2 - Absolute thresholds and frequency selectivity in normal and impaired hearing-- Chapter 3 - Loudness perception and intensity resolution in people with normal and impaired hearing-- Chapter 4 - Effects of cochlear damage on temporal resolution and temporal integration-- Chapter 5 - Pitch perception and frequency discrimination in normally hearing and hearing-impaired people-- Chapter 6 - Sound localization and binaural hearing in normal and hearing-impaired people-- Chapter 7 - Speech perception by people with cochlear damage-- Chapter 8 - Limitations and potentials of hearing aids.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198523307 20160528
Over the last decade, there has been a revolution in our understanding of the physiological role of the cochlea, and the mechanisms of cochlear hearing loss, the most common type of hearing loss in adults. This book is the first book covering this topic and aimed at the student and researcher working in the fields of psychophysics, audiology, and signal processing; the book covers the design of signal processing hearing aids. Readers in the field of auditory rehabilitation and its technology will also find this book very useful.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198523307 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
275 p.
  • 1. The Development of Deaf Children: Issues and Orientations-- 2. The Nature and Scope of Deafness-- 3. The Early Years: The Social-Emotional Context of Development-- 4. Social and Personality Development During the School Years-- 5. Foundations of Language Development in Deaf Children-- 6. Language Acquisition-- 7. Intelligence and Cognitive Development-- 8. Short-Term Memory: The Development of Memory Coding-- 9. Long-Term Memory: Codes, Organization, and Strategies-- 10. Creativity and Flexibility: The Myth(?) of Concreteness-- 11. Learning to Read and Write-- 12. The Development of Deaf Children: Toward an Integrated View.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195115758 20160528
The majority of young deaf children, especially those with non-signing parents, are reared in language-impoverished environments. This can cause their social and cognitive development to differ markedly from hearing children. The Psychological Development of Deaf Children details those potential differences, paying special attention to how the psychological development of deaf children is affected by their interpersonal communication with parents, peers, and teachers. This careful and balanced consideration of existing evidence and research provides a new psychological perspective on deaf children and deafness.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195115758 20160528
This volume provides the first comprehensive examination of deaf children's development. In examining its role from the pre-natal period to adulthood, deafness becomes a potential determiner of differences in social and cognitive functioning. Special attention is given to the role of interpersonal communication between deaf children and their parents, peers, and teachers. The majority of deaf children (those with hearing parents) have relatively little linguistic communication with their parents, but the apparent effects of this situation go far beyond language. Deaf children may develop social and cognitive strategies for dealing with the world that differ from those developed by hearing children. The existence of such differences need not imply that deaf children are any less capable than hearing peers, but a variety of studies have revealed that they lag behind hearing age-mates in several areas. A careful and balanced consideration of existing evidence concerning deafness and development provides a new psychological perspective on deaf children and deafness in light of recent findings concerning manual communication, parent-child interactions, and intellectual and academic assessments of hearing impaired children. The result is an integrated understanding of social, language, and cognitive development as they are affected by childhood deafness and by each other. In this context, several popular assumptions about deaf children - some in their favour, some against - are found to lack any basis in fact, and several new discoveries are evident.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195068993 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xvi, 243 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xiii, 410 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)

12. Dsh abstracts [1960 - 1985]

Journal/Periodical
25 v. 25 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving), SAL3 (off-campus storage)