Book
xvi, 507 leaves, bound.
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving), Special Collections
Book
xv, 447 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
When William Beebe needed to know what was going on in the depths of the ocean, he had himself lowered a half-mile down in a four-foot steel sphere to see-five times deeper than anyone had ever gone in the 1930s. When he wanted to trace the evolution of pheasants in 1910, he trekked on foot through the mountains and jungles of the Far East to locate every species. To decipher the complex ecology of the tropics, he studied the interactions of every creature and plant in a small area from the top down, setting the emerging field of tropical ecology into dynamic motion. William Beebe's curiosity about the natural world was insatiable, and he did nothing by halves. As the first biographer to see the letters and private journals Beebe kept from 1887 until his death in 1962, science writer Carol Grant Gould brings the life and times of this groundbreaking scientist and explorer compellingly to light. From the Galapagos Islands to the jungles of British Guiana, from the Bronx Zoo to the deep seas, Beebe's biography is a riveting adventure. A best-selling author in his own time. Beebe was a fearless explorer and thoughtful scientist who put his life on the line in pursuit of knowledge. The unique glimpses he provided into the complex web of interactions that keeps the earth alive and breathing have inspired generations of conservationists and ecologists. This exciting biography of a great naturalist brings William Beebe at last to the recognition he deserves.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781559638586 20160528
"The Remarkable Life of William Beebe" talks about the life and times of this groundbreaking scientist and explorer.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781597261074 20160528
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
136 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 21 cm.
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
v. : ill. (some col.) ; 31 cm.
  • v. 1. Aristotle to Alexander von Nordmann (330 B.C. to A.D. 1832)
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
212 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction. Beatrix versus the Botanists. The Wood Wide Web. Hidden Gardens of Atlantis. Bedbugs and Bubble Boys. Atoms of Revolution. Rewriting Genesis. New Gardeners of Eden. Further Reading. Acknowledgments. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780471399728 20160528
A fascinating exploration of symbiosis at the microscopic level and its radical extension of Darwinism Microbes have long been considered dangerous and disgusting--in short, "scum." But by forming mutually beneficial relationships with nearly every creature, be it alga with animals or zooplankton with zebrafish, microbes have in fact been innovative players in the evolutionary process. Now biologist and award--winning science writer Tom Wakeford shows us this extraordinary process at work. He takes us to such far--flung locales as underwater volcanoes, African termite mounds, the belly of a cow and even the gaps between our teeth, and there introduces us to a microscopic world at turns bizarre, seductive, and frightening, but ever responsible for advancing life in our macroscopic world. In doing so he also justifies the courage and vision of a series of scientists--from a young Beatrix Potter to Lynn Margulis--who were persecuted for believing evolution is as much a matter of interdependence and cooperation as it is great too--little--told tales of evolutionary science.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780471399728 20160528
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xv, 206 p. ; 24 cm.
For hundreds of years, the New England cod fishery was one of the most productive in the world, with higher average annual landings than any comparable ocean area. But in the late 1980s, fish catches dropped precipitously, as the cod, flounder and other species that had long dominated the region seemed to lose their ability to recover from the massive annual harvests. Even today, with fishing sharply restricted, populations have not recovered. Largely overlooked in this disaster is the intriguing human and scientific puzzle that lies at its heart: an anguished, seemingly inexplicable conflict between government scientists and fishermen over how fish populations are assessed, which has led to bitter disputes and has crippled efforts to agree on catch restrictions. In The Great Gulf, author David Dobbs offers a fascinating and compelling look at both sides of the conflict. With great immediacy, he describes the history of the fisheries science in this most studied of oceans, and takes the reader on a series of forays over the Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank on both fishing boats and research vessels. He introduces us to the challenges facing John Galbraith, Linda Despres, and Jay Burnett, passionate and dedicated scientists with the National Marine Fisheries Service who spend countless hours working to determine how many fish there really are, and to the dilemma of Dave Goethel, a whipsmart, conscientious fisherman with 20 years's experience who struggles to understand the complex world he works in while maintaining his livelihood in an age of increasing regulation. Dobbs paints the New England fishery problem in its full human and natural complexity, vividly portraying the vitality of an uncontrollable, ultimately unknowable sea and its strange, frightening, and beautiful creatures on the one hand, and on the other, the smart, irrepressible, unpredictable people who work there with great joy and humour, refusing to surrender to the many reasons for despair or cynicism. For anyone who read Cod or The Perfect Storm, this book offers the next chapter of the story-how today's fishers and fisheries scientists are grappling with the collapse of this fishery and trying to chart, amid uncertain waters, a course towards its restoration.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781559636636 20160528
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)

7. Guinness world records [2000 - ]

Journal/Periodical
v. : col. ill. ; 31 cm.
Green Library, Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving), SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vii, 150 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xii, 294 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
  • Preface 1: Thinking in Print: The Uses of Research, Public and Private 2: Connecting with Your Reader: (Re)Creating Your Self and Your Audience 3: From Topics to Questions 4: From Questions to Problems 5: From Questions to Sources 6: Using Sources 7: Making Good Arguments: An Overview 8: Claims and Evidence 9: Warrants 10: Qualifications 11: Pre-Drafting and Drafting 12: Communicating Evidence Visually 13: Revising Your Organization and Argument 14: Revising Style: Telling Your Story Clearly 15: Introductions Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226065830 20160528
This manual offers practical advice on the fundamentals of research to college and university students in all fields of study. It aims to teach much more than the mechanics of fact gathering, explaining how to approach a research project as an analytical process. The authors chart every stage of research, from finding a topic and generating research questions about it to marshalling evidence, constructing arguments, and writing everything up in a final report. Their advice is designed for use by both beginners and seasoned practitioners, and for projects from class papers to dissertations. This book is organized into four parts. Part One is an introduction to the distinctive nature, values and protocols of research. Part Two demystifies the art of discovering a topic. It outlines a wide range of sources, among them personal interests and passions. Parts Three and Four cover the essentials of argument - how to make a claim and support it - and ways to outline, draft, revise, rewrite and polish the final report. Part Three is a short course in the logic, structure, uses and common pitfalls of argumentation. The writing chapters in Part Four show how to present verbal and visual information effectively and how to shape sentences and paragraphs that communicate with power and precision.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226065830 20160528
Green Library, Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving), SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
359 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
viii, 530 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Science was not always the dominant way of knowing, as we see in this exploration of how human beings over the millennia have sought to understand the phenomena of life. Central to the puzzle are several questions: How did living matter arise, and how does it reproduce itself? How does life develop from a single cell into a complex organism? And how did the vast variety of species we see around us, and those long-extinct, come to be? One of the intellectual wonders of our time has been biologists' gradual solution of these great mysteries, beginning with the investigations of Aristotle and the Greeks, continuing through the experiments and theories of Darwin and his contemporaries, and culminating in the researches of 20th-century geneticists, developmental biologists, paleontologists, and other specialists. John Moore has taught biology instructors how to teach biology - by emphasizing the questions people have asked about life through the ages and the ways natural philosophers and scientists have sought the answers. This book makes his experience available to the general reader in an illustrated account of the history and workings of life. Employing a breadth of rhetorical strategies - including case histories, hypotheses and deductions, and chronological narrative - "Science as a Way of Knowing" aims to provide not only a cultural history of biology but also an introduction to the procedures and values of science. This book's interpretive, non-technical approach to the sciences of life should delight and inform anyone curious about what we knew and when we knew it. It is for the non-specialist seeking a deeper understanding of how modern molecular biology, ecology and biotechnology came to be.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674794801 20160527
Education Library (Cubberley), Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving), Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
x, 92 leaves, bound.
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving), SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections
Book
xii, 176 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
This book presents key conclusions about the controversial killing of thousands of dolphins each year during tuna fishing in the eastern tropical Pacific. Dolphins drown in nets that are set to catch yellowfin tuna, which tend to swim beneath dolphin herds. After 20 years of intense debate among environmentalists, the tuna industry, and policymakers, this fatal by-product of tuna fishing remains a high-profile public issue. "Dolphins and the Tuna Industry" provides a neutral examination of the scientific and technical questions at the core of the problem. Recommendations for solutions are offered in two areas: developing new techniques that promise to reduce dolphin mortality with the existing purse-seine method of tuna fishing, and developing entirely new methods of finding tuna that are not swimming with dolphins. "Dolphins and the Tuna Industry" provides a comprehensive, highly readable overview of the dolphin-tuna controversy, useful to experts and newcomers to the issue. It explores the processes of tuna fishing and dolphin mortality, the status of the tuna industry, and the significant progress made in reducing dolphin mortality through modifications in fishing practice. The volume includes: an overview of U.S. laws and policies relating to tuna and dolphins; an illustrated look at how tuna fishing crews use their equipment, focusing on the purse seine, which is the method most economical to the industry but most deadly to the dolphins; an overview of what is known about tuna and dolphin populations and the remarkable bond between them; a step-by-step description of the fishing process and efforts to let dolphins escape from the nets; and an analysis of possible approaches to reducing dolphin kill, including more stringent regulatory approaches and incentives for the tuna industry. This book will be indispensable to environmental and animal protection groups, tuna fishing crews and processors, companies that market tuna products, policymakers, regulators, and concerned individuals.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780309047357 20160527
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
viii, 49 leaves, bound.
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving), Special Collections
Book
xv, 440 p.
  • Group report - what is the resource potential of the deep ocean?, N.F. Exon et al-- new concepts from the deep oceans - inspiration for earth sciences?, J. Francheteau and J. Thiede-- polymetallic sulfide riches from the deep - fact or fallacy?, S.D. Scott-- ocean mining and the future of world order, E. Mann Borgese-- potential use of the deep seafloor for waste disposal, C.D. Hollister-- group report - how can anthropogenic impact on the shelf seas be defined and controlled?, J.H. Hull et al-- the physical exploitation of shallow seas, P.J. Cook et al-- what is the environmental capacity of enclosed marginal seas? - approaches to the problem in the Baltic, North and Mediterranean seas, K.C. Emeis et al-- management of the coastal zone - impact of onshore activities on the coastal environment, J.D. Milliman-- how can fragile marine ecosystems best be conserved?, J.S. Bunt-- group report - how can we assess the likely impact of humans on the deep seafloor?, W.C. Burnett et al-- deep-sea physical oceanography and contaminant dispersal, C. Garrett-- flux of biogenous materials to the seafloor - open questions, W.H. Berger and G. Wefer-- global chemical fluxes and fluid flow through the seafloor, J. Boulegue and C. Pflumio-- deep-sea Benthic ecosystems - dynamic aspects, M. Sibuet-- group report - offshore petroleum hydrocarbon exploitation - reserves, impacts, and alternatives, P.J. Cook et al-- the short-and long-term effects of oil spills on marine ecosystems, C.S. Johnston-- the potential of ocean energy conversion systems and their impact on the environment, J.R. Vadus et al.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780471931911 20160527
This study identifies the resources of the seafloor and the impact of their exploitation on the marine environment. It explores the riches of marine materials, the ability of the seafloor to absorb large quantities of waste, and the archaeological importance of seafloor sediments.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780471931911 20160527
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xiii, 92 p. : maps (color) ; 29 cm.
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
3 v. : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.
  • I. Aufsatzteil
  • II. Katalogteil
  • III. Referenzteil.
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xiv, 321 leaves, bound.
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving), Special Collections
Book
xii, 356 p., [15] leaves of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
Although "Alvin", a small, deep-diving submarine, was launched in the face of doubts about its value, safety and cost-effectiveness, it has been involved in some of the most important marine missions of recent times. "Alvin" and its crew found and retrieved a lost H-bomb, became the first to reach the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, discovered exotic new forms of life in the warm springs of the Galapagos Rift, and sailed through the hyperthermal vents of the East Pacific Rise, where fluid deposits are hot enough to melt lead. This study of the creation of "Alvin" charts these and many other dives, including the most famous of them all, the location in 1985 of the wreck of the "Titanic".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195061918 20160528
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xi, 73 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)