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Book
xv, 215 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
How did one of the great inventions of the 19th century - Thomas Edison's phonograph - eventually lead to one of the most culturally and economically significant technologies of the 20th and 21st centuries? Sound Recording tells that story, tracing the history of the business boom and the cultural revolution begun by Edison's invention. Ever since, recorded sound has been all around us - not just in reproducing and playing popular music, but also in more mundane areas, such as office dictation machines, radio and television programmes, and even telephone answering machines. Just as the styles of music have evolved over the years, the formats on which this music was played have changed as well. The quest for better sound was one of the driving forces of technological change, but so too were business strategies, patent battles, and a host of other factors. Sound Recording contains information that will appeal anyone interested in the history of recorded music and sound technology, such as the following facts: The composer John Phillip Sousa once denounced sound recordings as a threat to good musical taste, but made many recordings over the years; The first modern "cassette" tape cartridge and the stereophonic LP record were both introduced by RCA in 1958. The tape cartridge flopped almost immediately; the stereo LP was the music industry's biggest hit ever; Chrysler automobiles of the late 1950s offered "Highway Hi-Fi, " a dashboard phonograph that could play a record without skipping; The predecessor of the Compact Disc was a 12-inch home videodisc system from the late 1970s - the first of its kind - called DiscoVision. The volume includes a timeline and a bibliography.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780313330902 20160527
Archive of Recorded Sound, SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xvii, 341 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Acknowledgments-- Contributors-- Introduction-C. Mee & E. Daniel-- AUDIO RECORDING-- The Magnetic Recording of Sound-M. Clark-- The Telegraphone-M. Clark & H. Nielsen-- Steel Tape and Wire Recorders-M. Clark-- The Introduction of the Magnetophon-F. Engel-- Building on the Magnetophon-B. Gooch-- Product Diversification-M. Clark-- The History of Digital Audio-J. Watkinson-- VIDEO RECORDING-- The Challenge of Recording Video-F. Remley-- Early Fixed-Head Video Recorders-F. Jorgensen-- The Ampex Quadruplex Recorders-J. Mallinson-- Helical-Scan Recorders for Broadcasting-H. Sugaya-- Consumer Video Recorders-H. Sugaya-- Digital Video Recording-K. Sadashige-- DATA RECORDING-- Capturing Data Magnetically-J. Monson-- Data Storage on Drums-S. Rubens-- Data Storage on Tape-W. Phillips-- Data Storage on Hard Magnetic Disks-L. Stevens-- Data Storage on Floppy Disks-D. Noble-- Instrumentation Recording on Magnetic Tape-F. Jorgensen-- Index-- About the Editors.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780780347090 20160528
"The first magnetic recording device was demonstrated and patented by the Danish inventor Valdemar Poulsen in 1898. Poulsen made a magnetic recording of his voice on a length of piano wire. MAGNETIC RECORDING traces the development of the watershed products and the technical breakthroughs in magnetic recording that took place during the century from Paulsen's experiment to today's ubiquitous audio, video, and data recording technologies including tape recorders, video cassette recorders, and computer hard drives. An international author team brings a unique perspective, drawn from professional experience, to the history of magnetic recording applications. Their key insights shed light on how magnetic recording triumphed over all competing technologies and revolutionized the music, radio, television and computer industries. They also show how these developments offer opportunities for applications in the future. MAGNETIC RECORDING features 116 illustrations, including 92 photographs of historic magnetic recording machines and their inventors." Sponsored by: IEEE Magnetics Society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780780347090 20160528
Archive of Recorded Sound, SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
267 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
  • The nature of sound-- sound characteristics-- sound quality-- the hearing process-- acoustics-- reverberation-- choosing the right acoustic-- acoustic treatment-- acoustic isolation-- artificial reverberation-- using reverb-- microphones-- moving-coil microphones-- ribbon microphones-- condenser microphones-- vocalist's mocirophones-- personal, lavalier or clip-on microphones-- close-working microphones-- acoustical boundary wireless microphones-- super-directional microphones-- the shot-gun microphone-- windscreens-- using microphones-- sound control-- sound shaping-- the points of control-- volume indicators-- sound mixing desks-- automated sound mixing-- automatic control-- time delay - the Haas effect-- binaural hearing-- stereophony-- stereophonic microphone arrangements-- stereophonic microphone types-- quadraphony-- surround sound-- balancing speech-- drama-- recording the concert piano-- recording the rhythm piano-- various keyboard instruments-- strings-- woodwind instruments-- brass instruments-- chamber orchestra-- the symphony orchestra-- big (dance) band-- rock groups-- multi-track recording-- signal processing-- dynamic noise reduction - the Dolby A system-- the Dolby B noise reduction system-- the Dolby C noise reduction system-- Dolby SR and S noise reductions systems-- DBX, DNL AND BTSC noise reduction systems-- basic magnetic recording system-- magnetic induction-- magnetization characteristic-- electromagnetism-- recording tape-- types of tape-- recording tape coatings-- tape erasure-- the recording process-- DC bias-- AC bias-- cross-field bias-- bias adjustment-- the replay head-- tape head mechanical adjustments-- the replay process-- record/reproduce characteristics-- equalization-- recording standards-- tape transport-- reel-to-reel tape transport systems-- tape recorder motors-- tape spooling mechanisms-- tape editing-- cassette recorders-- cassette drive mechanisms-- high quality cassette recorders-- broadcast cartridge machines-- tape recorder faults and mechanical adjustments-- tape recorder amplifiers-- tape recorder electrical adjustment-- disc reproduction-- turntable drive systems-- crystal drive turntable-- reproducing styli-- stylus tracking-- the tracking arm-- magnetic pick-up heads-- non-magnetic pick-up heads-- stereophonic pick-up heads-- pick-up characteristics-- digital audio-- analog-to-digital conversion-- digital-to-analog conversion, oversampling and error correction-- recording digital audio-- digital audio static head (DASH) recorders-- the R-dat recorder-- R-dat offset Azimuth recording-- the S-dat recorder-- video 8 audio recording-- compact discs-- reproducing compact discs-- compact disc tracking-- recordable optical (WORM) discs-- tapeless recording and editing-- loudspeakers-- loudspeaker enclosures-- electrostatic and plastic film loudspeakers.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780240513041 20160528
This new edition incorporates recent developments in the recording field, such as WORM disks and thermomagnetic, which are still in the development stage. More information about current operational practices is included as well as expanded material on the treatment of CDs, R-DAT and S-DAT.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780240513041 20160528
Archive of Recorded Sound, SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xviii, 59 p. ; 21 cm.
Archive of Recorded Sound, SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
7 v. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • [1] The early years, 1875-1925.--[2] National service in war and peace, 1925-1975.--[3] Switching technology, 1925-1975.--[4] Physical sciences, 1925-1980.--[5] Communication sciences, 1925-1980.--[6] Electronics technology, 1925-1975.--[7] Transmission technology, 1925-1975.
Archive of Recorded Sound, SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving), SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
2 v. fronts., plates, ports., facsims, diagrs. 22 cm.
Archive of Recorded Sound, SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving), SAL3 (off-campus storage)

7. The Atlantic monthly [1857 - 1932] Online

Journal/Periodical
149 v. ill. 24-29 cm.
Collection
Stephen J. Gould Rare Books Collection
Archive of Recorded Sound, SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving), SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections