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1. La Casa Ausente [2013]

Video
2 videodiscs, each 55 min : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. Sound: digital; optical; stereo; Dolby. Video: NSTC. Digital: video file; DVD video; all regions.
  • disc 1. Spanish version
  • disc 2. Spanish version with English subtitles.
Pioneering architect Fernando Abruña Charneco, FAIA, confronts climate change with his sustainable constructions. An apprentice of R. Buckminster Fuller, Charneco puts nature first before erecting a building -- a practice which would later be labeled as sustainable green architecture.
Media & Microtext Center
Video
1 videodisc (ca. 180 [i.e. 160] min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
  • The green apple
  • Green for all
  • The green machine
  • Gray to green
  • China : from red to green
  • Deeper shades of green.
Examines the economies of being environmentally conscious in green building design. The first program, The green apple, uses New York City, particularly One Bryant Park and the Solaire, to demonstrates how the ubiquitous skyscraper can be a model of environmental responsibility. The second episode, Green for all, features architect and activist Sergio Palleroni as he works to provide design solutions to regions suffering from social and humanitarian crises. Shows projects in East Austin, Tex. and with the Yaqui Indians in Mexico where architecture students are helping residents build low-cost, environmentally-friendly homes using local materials. The third program, The green machine, follows Mayor Richard M. Daley as he strives to make Chicago "the greenest city in America" with numerous LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design)-certified buildings, a solar-powered public transportation system, and many green roofs, including one on Chicago's City Hall. The fourth episode, Gray to green, takes the notion of the three R's (reduce, reuse, recycle) to grand proportions by turning Boston's "Big Dig" steel and concrete waste into spectacular residential design. The fifth program, China : from red to green? depicts a rapidly urbanizing country at its tipping point and finds a sustainable solution in Steven Holl's Beijing project, which will have the largest geothermal heating/cooling and greywater recycling system in the world upon completion. The sixth program, Deeper shades of green, presents three visionaries who are changing the face of architecture and environmentalism and features some of their projects. Focuses on Ken Yeang and his "bio-climatic" National Library of Singapore, Werner Sobek and R128, his energy-efficient, steel and glass box house, and William McDonough and his model sustainable village of Huangbaiyu, China.
Media & Microtext Center
Video
1 videodisc (60 min.) : sd., col. with b&w sequences ; 4 3/4 in. + insert (4 p.)
Biophilic design is an innovative way of designing the places where we live, work, and learn. People need nature in a deep and fundamental fashion, but we have often designed our cities and suburbs in ways that both degrade the environment and alienate us from nature. The recent trend in green architecture has decreased the environmental impact of the built environment, but it has accomplished little in the way of reconnecting us to the natural world, the missing piece in the puzzle of sustainable development. The film features buildings that connect people and nature-- hospitals where patients heal faster, schools where children's test scores are higher, offices where workers are more productive, and communities where people know more of their neighbors and families thrive.
Media & Microtext Center
Video
1 videodisc (180 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
  • Episode 1. The Druk White Lotus School - Ladakh
  • Episode 2. Greening the federal government
  • Episode 3. Bogotá: building a sustainable city
  • Episode 4. Affordable green housing
  • Epsisode 5. Adaptive reuse in the Netherlands
  • Episode 6. Architecture 2030.
A six-part film featuring the designers and drivers of change in the world of sustainable architecture. Each episode explores the potential of the built environment to help reverse our global climate crisis.
Media & Microtext Center
Video
1 videodisc (ca. 51 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
  • The problem
  • McDonough & Braungart
  • Cradle to cradle
  • No more waste
  • Herman Miller
  • Ford Motor Company
  • China's circular economy.
Man is the only creature that produces landfills. Natural resources are being depleted on a rapid scale while production and consumption are rising in nations like China and India. Waste production worldwide is enormous and if we do not do anything, we will soon have turned our entire planet into one big messy landfill. But there is hope. "Cradle to cradle" manufacturing and building is a revolutionary concept advocated by German chemist Michael Braungart and the American designer-architect William McDonough. This theory argues that manufacturers' products, when discarded, should either be completely recyclable in the Technosphere or become biodegradable food for the Biosphere. While fundamentally changing the way we produce and build, these ideas are increasingly being embraced by major corporations and governments worldwide.
Media & Microtext Center

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