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Book
3 v. : maps ; 18 cm.
  • v. 1. Fellowship of the ring
  • v. 2. Two towers
  • v. 3. Return of the king.
Law Library (Crown)

2. Proceedings of the sessions of Oyer and Terminer and General Goal Delivery [electronic resource] : held in Kingston-upon-Thames for the county of Surrey, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday the 22d, 23d, 24th and 25th of August, in the thirteenth year of his present Majesty's reign and in the year of our lord 1739 : before the Right Honourable Sir William Lee, knt., Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's-Bench, the Right Honourable Sir John Comyns, knt., Lord Chief Baron His Majesty's Court of Exchequer, and the rest of His Majesty's justices assigned to deliver the said Gaol of the prisoners therein being : containing the trial (at large) of all the prisoners, especially those who received sentence death, viz. 1. Noah Gooby for robbing Mr. Deacon in Kennington Lane, of a silver watch, a gold ring, a pair of silver shoe and knee buckles and six shillings in money. 2. Norris Hodson, for robbing the Lady Catherine Forbes, or a silver patch-box, on putney-common. 3. John Hannah, (evidence against Captain Longdon) for robbing Jame Haward on the highway between Kingston and Dixton, of a Guinea, and a linnen bag. 4. Michael Luca, otherswise Standley, fot taking out of the house of John Parnell two gold rings, and money to the value of 5l. 5,6,7. Peter Willington, Johanna Rashford Sambo, and Eleanor Spencer for robbing Stephen Freeman, (an ---famous pegg-maker in the mint of a watch, a pair of shoe and knee buckles and 8. John Hollings for stealing a horse, a bag, part of a leaden pump, and iron work, out of the field and garden of Josiah Wordsworth, Esq., at Croydon, in Surry : likewise, a particular account of Hugh Randall, father-in-law to, and concerned in the above robbery with, Hollings, who kill'd himself in the stock-house at Kingston before trial and the reasons that induced him to make this attempt on his life : also the trial of William Prestage, for manslaughter and above twenty other very remarkable trials [1749]

Book
18, [2] p.
galenet.galegroup.com Making of Modern Law. Trials, 1600-1926 For assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 207 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: "The Ends Justify the Means" or "One Must Consider the Final Result"? 1.Studying and Using History: Charlie Wilson's War 2.Caress or Annihilate When Taking Power: The Godfather and Breaking Bad 3.Nip Political Problems in the Bud: Charlie Wilson's War, Primary Colors, and A Bronx Tale 4.People Accustomed to Freedom Will Seek It Again: Braveheart and Red Dawn 5.The Difficulty of Introducing Something New and the Importance of Being Armed: The Untouchables and Charlie Wilson's War 6.Bribery and Dirty Work: Lincoln, Richard III, and Wag the Dog 7.The Problems of Being in Charge without Prior Experience: Dave and Orphan Black 8.The Use of Cruelty: Hoffa, Wag the Dog, and The Untouchables 9.Reliance on the People: All the King's Men and O Brother, Where Art Thou? 10.Rally 'Round the Flag: Wag the Dog, Braveheart, and The Patriot 11.Power Can Be Exercised in Any Institution: The Da Vinci Code and The Manchurian Candidate 12.Keep Your Own Army and Prepare It for War: Braveheart, Heat, Alexander, and Independence Day 13.Vices versus Virtues and Learning Not to Be Good: Scarface, The Godfather, The Departed, and Richard III 14.Miserliness is Better than Liberality: Ghostbusters and The Patriot 15.It is Better to Be Feared than Loved: Band of Brothers, A Few Good Men, and A Bronx Tale 16.Deception: The Godfather, Primary Colors, The Walking Dead, and Bob Roberts 17.The Lion and the Fox: The Godfather, Breaking Bad, Charlie Wilson's War, The Usual Suspects, and Argo 18.Pick a Side and Stick to Your Decisions in Politics: The Contender, Harry Potter, and House of Cards 19.The Need for Both Military and Popular Support: Lincoln, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, and Red Dawn 20.Honor Those with Talent and Hold Festivals: Gladiator, The Hunger Games, and House of Cards 21.Have Only a Few Trusted Advisors and Give them Wealth so they Remain Loyal: House of Cards, Breaking Bad, The Departed, and Lord of the Rings 22.Virtue versus Fortune: Election and Mad Men Conclusions: Seeking Greater Glory.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780739195949 20160618
Niccolo Machiavelli's The Prince remains an influential book more than five centuries after he wrote his timeless classic. However, the political philosophy expressed by Machiavelli in his tome is often misunderstood. Although he thought humans to be rational, self-interested creatures, and even though he proposed an approach to politics in which the ends justify the means, Machiavelli was not, as some have argued, simply "a teacher of evil." The Prince's many ancient and medieval examples, while relevant to sixteenth century readers, are lost on most of today's students of Machiavelli. Examples from modern films and television programs, which are more familiar and understandable to contemporary readers, provide a better way to accurately teach Machiavelli's lessons. Indeed, modern media, such as Breaking Bad, The Godfather, The Walking Dead, Charlie Wilson's War, House of Cards, Argo, and The Departed, are replete with illustrations that teach Machiavelli's critical principles, including the need to caress or annihilate, learning "how not to be good, " why it is better to be feared than loved, and how to act as both the lion and the fox. Modern media are used in this book to exemplify the tactics Machiavelli advocated and to comprehensively demonstrate that Machiavelli intended for government actors and those exercising power in other contexts to fight for a greater good and strive to achieve glory.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780739195949 20160618
Law Library (Crown)

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