%{search_type} search results

24,566 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
xii, 122 pages.
Law Library (Crown)
x, 225 pages ; 24 cm
  • Regulatory parity in post-Brexit UK-EU financial regulation : EU norms, international financial standards, or a hybrid model? / Eilís Ferran
  • The UK financial market : free movement of persons / Catherine Barnard
  • EU financial governance after Brexit : the rise of technocracy and the absorption of the UK's withdrawal / Niamh Moloney
  • The UK's third-country status following Brexit : post-Brexit models, third-country equivalence, and Switzerland / Kern Alexander
  • The "default option", the WTO, and cross-border financial services trade after Brexit / Andrew Lang.
Law Library (Crown)
xxxvi, 193 pages ; 26 cm.
  • Introductory observations
  • Contractual estoppel : general principle
  • Applications
  • Entire agreement and non-reliance clauses
  • Limits
  • Limits : controls over exclusion clauses
  • Contractual estoppel in the family of estoppels.
This book is the first comprehensive account of contractual estoppel. Contractual estoppel is a new and exciting development in the common law, widely employed and of considerable practical utility. The concept has been noticed by academics, mostly to be criticised as anomaly, misnomer and an objectionable policy choice, and commentary on the concept has been limited to recitation and critique of a few principal cases. Yet this book examines numerous judicial decisions which apply or discuss contractual estoppel, and offers a full and systematic exploration of its origin, principled basis, practical applications and limits. In this new title, the author, Alexander Trukhtanov, responds to policy objections and seeks to answer the charge that contractual estoppel is a misnomer, anomaly or distortion of reliance-based categories of estoppel, by showing that contractual estoppel is its own category of legal estoppel. The book is a single point of reference for a systematic and organised exposition of the subject and an explanation of how it fits into existing law. It is practice-oriented but engages with important conceptual points. Contractual Estoppel will be of interest to practitioners, whether draftsmen, litigators or advocates, as well as academics and post-graduate students of contract law.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138208537 20180205
Law Library (Crown)
xxi, 174 pages ; 25 cm
  • Preface
  • Equality
  • European perspectives
  • The Equality Act 2010
  • Age and ageism
  • Disability
  • Pregnancy and maternity
  • Race, colour, ethnicity and migrant workers
  • Religion or belief
  • Sex equality
  • Sexual orientation and gender reassignment
  • Discrimination in the workplace.
Discrimination and the Law provides an exploration and evaluation of discrimination law, focusing primarily on discrimination in employment. Introducing readers to the concepts of equality and the historical origins of discrimination law, Malcolm Sargeant explores the wider political, social and economic contexts through which discrimination law has evolved. The second edition has been thoroughly updated and includes a new chapter considering discrimination against trade unionists, discrimination against `non-standard' workers as well as the public sector equality duty. The book begins with an examination of what is meant by such concepts as equality and discrimination followed by an analysis of the Equality Act 2010 and the impact of EU and international law. All the protected characteristics contained in the Equality Act 2010 are critically considered (age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex, sexual orientation). Issues not covered by the legislation such as those relating to multiple discrimination and caste discrimination are also analysed. Important cases from the UK courts as well as international courts are considered. The book also contains an appendix with the most relevant parts of the 2010 Act. Important cases are highlighted in the text and some reflections as the basis for further discussion are included at the end of each chapter. This is an essential introduction to the wide-ranging law relating to discrimination in the UK for law, HRM and business students.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138702356 20180306
Law Library (Crown)
xv, 267 pages ; 22 cm.
  • Introduction: The Eighteenth Century and the Middle Ages1 The Norman Yoke: Feudal Law2 The Norman Yoke: Canon Law3 Daniel Leonard and the Modern British Empire4 Is there a British Empire?5 Imperial Origins: Wales, Ireland, America6 Empire by ConsentConclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319664767 20180129
This book contributes to the increasing interest in John Adams and his political and legal thought by examining his work on the medieval British Empire. For Adams, the conflict with England was constitutional because there was no British Empire, only numerous territories including the American colonies not consolidated into a constitutional structure. Each had a unique relationship to the English. In two series of essays he rejected the Parliament's claim to legislate for the internal governance of the American colonies. His Dissertation on the Canon and Feudal Law (1765) identified these claims with the Yoke, Norman tyranny over the defeated Saxons after 1066. Parliament was seeking to treat the colonists in similar fashion. The Novanglus essays (1774-75), traced the origin of the colonies, demonstrating that Parliament played no role in their establishment and so had no role in their internal governance without the colonists' subsequent consent.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319664767 20180129
Law Library (Crown)
vi, 231 pages ; 25 cm
  • "The EU isn't much cop but" : remain supporters' use of coordinative onstructions
  • Hedging and modality v. strident claims and apparent absence of doubt
  • More to imperatives than meets the eye
  • Inclusive we, the former city broker as champion of the common man, and good old Bojo : how the pro-Brexit press created the illusion of a classless alliance
  • Democracy myths and facts : a double defeat for David Cameron
  • "Free" : a little word that did a big job for Brexit
  • Nominalization, presupposition and naturalization
  • The language of racism lite, and not so lite
  • Comparison with the Scottish independence referendum of 2014 : how project Fear worked in 2014 but not in 2016
  • Leave's appointment with history and Remain's another day at the office
  • Little Englanders or reaching out to the world beyond europe? : comparison with the 1975 referendum on remaining a member of the European Economic Community
  • From "Up yours Delors" (1990) to "Stick it up your Juncker" (2016) : was it the sun wot won it once again?
  • Dirty tricks : lies, personal attacks and the Queen supports UKIP
  • The day after: how could this happen?
  • The issue that would not go away : the general election of 2017
  • The epilogue so far.
Law Library (Crown)
xii, 274 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • The cathedral church : foundation, form and function
  • The episcopal throne : the appointment and functions of the bishop
  • The font, altar and pulpit : sacraments, worship and mission
  • The nave and crossing : the cathedral community, hospitality and outreach
  • The choir and presbytery : the dean, canons and musicians
  • The chapter house : the body corporate : Council, Chapter and College of Canons
  • The library and cloister : education : learning and teaching
  • The treasury : cathedral property, treasure and finance
  • The fabric of the cathedral church : care and conservation
  • The cathedral close : the precinct, houses and security
  • Conclusion: The cathedral as a normative space : conception and experience.
This original book is a comprehensive, richly documented and critical examination of laws applicable to Anglican cathedrals in England, some of the most iconic monuments in the national heritage and centres of spiritual and cultural capital. Law is the missing link in the emerging field of cathedral studies. The book fills this gap. It explores historical antecedents of modern cathedral law, traces aspects of them that still endure, and explains the law with particular reference to the recommendations of the Archbishops' Commission on Cathedrals 1994 which led to the most radical changes in the legal history of these churches since the Reformation, culminating in the Cathedrals Measure 1999 and associated later legislation. The book compares the domestic constitutions and statutes of all the cathedrals of the Church of England today - old foundations, new foundations and parish church cathedrals - as well as policies and guidelines applicable to or adopted by them. Whilst national law acts as a fundamental unifying force, there is considerable diversity as between these in terms of the breadth and depth of their coverage of topics. In the socio-legal tradition, the book also explores through interviews with clergy and others, at half of the cathedrals, how laws are experienced in practice. These reveal that whilst much of the law is perceived as working well, there are equally key areas of concern. To this end, the book proposes areas for further research and debate with a view to possible reform. Taking an architectural feature of cathedrals as the starting point for each chapter, from cathedral governance through mission, ministry, music and education to cathedral property, what emerges is that law and architecture have a symbiotic relationship so that a cathedral is itself a form of juristecture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138962699 20171030
Law Library (Crown)
ix, 214 pages ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
xxiii, 208 pages ; 26 cm
  • A history of patents
  • Private bill procedure
  • The beginnings
  • The protection of inventions by enactment
  • The non obstante clause and the right to work
  • The restriction and regulation of company patents
  • The specification and its concealment
  • The prolongation of patents
  • The grant of parliamentary rewards : an alternative
  • Restoration and renewal fees
  • Re-dating and priority fights
  • The end of private business.
In the history of British patent law, the role of Parliament is often side-lined. This is largely due to the raft of failed or timid attempts at patent law reform. Yet there was another way of seeking change. By the end of the nineteenth century, private legislation had become a mechanism or testing ground for more general law reforms. The evolution of the law had essentially been privatised and was handled in the committee rooms in Westminster. This is known in relation to many great industrial movements such as the creating of railways, canals and roads, or political movements such as the powers and duties of local authorities, but it has thus far been largely ignored in the development of patent law. This book addresses this shortfall and examines how private legislation played an important role in the birth of modern patent law.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138565555 20180219
Law Library (Crown)
xxiv, 498 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Foreword / Dominic Grieve QC MP
  • Introduction / Baroness Elizabeth Butler-Sloss
  • Preliminary thoughts / Javier García Oliva and Helen Hall
  • Church/state relations and their historical evolution : whale knees or penguin wings?
  • Religion in the current paradigm : the flight of the penguin?
  • Non-religious beliefs in the current paradigm
  • The rule of law and the religious character of the Constitution and the wider legal framework
  • Parliamentry supremacy and the religious character of the Constitution and the wider legal framework
  • Checks and balances, separation of powers and the religious character of the Constitution and the wider legal framework
  • Human rights and the religious character of the Constitution and the wider legal framework.
This book examines the existing constitutional and legal system in England, Wales and Scotland, through the prism of its treatment of religion. The study encompasses questions of Church/State relations, but pushes far beyond these. It asks whether the approach to religion which has spread out from establishment to permeate the whole legal framework is a cause of concern or celebration in relation to individual and collective freedoms. The primary focus of the work is the synergy between the religious dimension of the juridical system and the fundamental pillars of the Constitution (Parliamentary Sovereignty, the Rule of Law, Separation of Powers and Human Rights). Javier Garcia Oliva and Helen Hall challenge the view that separation between public and religious authorities is the most conducive means of nurturing a free and democratic society in modern Britain. The authors explore whether, counterintutitvely for some, the religious dynamic to the legal system actually operates to safeguard liberties, and has a role in generating an inclusive and adaptable backdrop for our collective life. They suggest that the present paradigm brings benefits for citizens of all shades of religious belief and opinion (including Atheist, Humanist and other anti-theist perspectives), as well as secondary advantages for those with profound beliefs on non-religious matters e.g. Pacifism and Veganism. In support of their contentions, Garcia Oliva and Hall examine how the religious dimension of the legal framework operates to further essential constitutional principles in diverse settings, ranging from Criminal to Family Law. In a ground-breaking move, the authors also set the legal discussion alongside its social and cultural context. They consider how the theological perspectives of the larger faith traditions might influence members' ideas around the key constitutional precepts, and they include extracts from interviews which give the personal perspective of more than 100 individuals on contemporary issues of law and religious freedom. These voices are drawn from a range of fields and positions on faith. Whilst the authors are at pains to stress that these sections do not support or advance their legal conclusions, they do provide readers with a human backdrop to the discussion, and demonstrate its crucial importance in 21st century Britain.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138838352 20171002
Law Library (Crown)
xv, 240 pages ; 24 cm
  • Proprietary medicines and the fiscal state
  • The medicine stamp duty and the authority of law
  • The tax and the profession of pharmacy
  • The tax and the integrity of medicines
  • The demise of the tax.
In 1783, a stamp duty was imposed on proprietary or 'quack' medicines. These largely useless but often dangerous remedies were immensely popular. The tax, which lasted until 1941, was imposed to raise revenue. It failed in its incidental regulatory purpose, had a negative effect in that the stamp was perceived as a guarantee of quality, and had a positive effect in encouraging disclosure of the formula. The book explains the considerable impact the tax had on chemists and druggists - how it led to an improvement in professional status, but undermined it by reinforcing their reputations as traders. The legislation imposing the tax was complex, ambiguous and never reformed. The tax authorities had to administer it, and executive practice came to dominate it. A minor, specialised, low-yield tax is shown to be of real significance in the pharmaceutical context, and of exceptional importance as a model revealing the wider impact of tax law and administration.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107025455 20180205
Law Library (Crown)
xix, 309 pages ; 24 cm
  • Access to justice and legal aid cuts : a mismatch of concepts in the contemporary Australian and British legal landscapes / Asher Flynn and Jacqueline Hodgson
  • Challenges facing the Australian legal aid system / Mary Anne Noone
  • Rhyme and reason in the uncertain development of legal aid in Australia / Jeff Giddings
  • The rise and decline of criminal legal aid in England and Wales / Tom Smith and Ed Cape
  • A view from the bench : a judicial perspective on legal representation, court excellence, and therapeutic jurisprudence / Pauline Spencer
  • Face-to-interface communication : accessing justice by video link from prison / Carolyn McKay
  • The rise of "DIY" law : implications for legal aid / Kathy Laster and Ryan Kornhauser
  • Community lawyers, law reform, and systemic change : is the end in sight? / Liana Buchanan
  • What if there is nowhere to get advice? / James Organ and Jennifer Sigafoos
  • The end of "tea and sympathy"? : the changing role of voluntary advice services in enabling access to justice? / Samuel Kirwan
  • Reasoning a human right to legal aid / Simon Rice
  • Cuts to civil legal aid and the identity crisis in lawyering : lessons from the experience of England and Wales / Natalie Byrom
  • Access to what? : LASPO and mediation / Rosemary Hunter, Anne Barlow, Janet Smithson, and Jan Ewing
  • Insights into inequality : Victorian women's access to legal aid / Pasanna Mutha-Merennege
  • Indigenous people and access to justice in civil and family law / Melanie Schwartz
  • Austerity and justice in the age of migration / Ana Aliverti.
This book considers how access to justice is affected by restrictions to legal aid budgets and increasingly prescriptive service guidelines. As common law jurisdictions, England and Wales and Australia, share similar ideals, policies and practices, but they differ in aspects of their legal and political culture, in the nature of the communities they serve and in their approaches to providing access to justice. These jurisdictions thus provide us with different perspectives on what constitutes justice and how we might seek to overcome the burgeoning crisis in unmet legal need. The book fills an important gap in existing scholarship as the first to bring together new empirical and theoretical knowledge examining different responses to legal aid crises both in the domestic and comparative contexts, across criminal, civil and family law. It achieves this by examining the broader social, political, legal, health and welfare impacts of legal aid cuts and prescriptive service guidelines. Across both jurisdictions, this work suggests that it is the most vulnerable groups who lose out in the way the law now operates in the twenty-first century. This book is essential reading for academics, students, practitioners and policymakers interested in criminal and civil justice, access to justice, the provision of legal assistance and legal aid.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781509900848 20170327
Law Library (Crown)
xvi, 519 pages ; 22 cm
  • Background
  • Substance
  • People
  • Arbitration and the law
  • Conclusions.
Despite plague, fire, political upheaval and religious strife, in the 17th century English people of all kinds used mediation and arbitration routinely to help resolve their differences. Kings and poor widows were parties. Kings and yeomen arbitrated. Francis Bacon, Edward Coke, Samuel Pepys, Robert Hooke and James I himself all took what they called arbitrament for granted as the best way of resolving all kinds of disputes they could not manage themselves. The redoubtable Lady Anne Clifford was exceptional; she successfully withstood the insistent demands of James I to arbitrate in her land dispute with her husband and family. Women appear as often as men in many of the primary sources and have a chapter to themselves. There are five parts: Part One describes the background; Part Two the subject matter: land, family and business; Part Three the people: parties and arbitrators; Part Four the law, and Part Five draws conclusions. The 17th century saw great changes in English life, but few and only towards its end in the ways in which parties managed their disputes by arbitrament, usually asking an even number of third parties, first to arrange a settlement as mediators and, if that failed, to adjudicate as arbitrators. Parties relied on bonds to ensure each other's performance of the submission and award. But, as the century drew to its close, lawyers advised their clients to take advantage of the courts' offer to accept a claim and, with the parties' consent, to refer it to arbitration, with arbitrators appointed by the court. That process came to be called a rule of court and the Government established it by the Arbitration Act 1698.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780957215313 20170213
Law Library (Crown)
xiv, 275 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction 1. `Fie, painted rhetoric!' Common Law, Satire and the Language of the Beast I. Oratory, Empire and Common Law II. Rhetoric, Method and the English Lawyer III. Our English Martiall: John Davies of the Middle Temple IV. Love's Labour's Lost, the Inns of Court and the Sweet Smoke of Rhetoric 2. Princes Set Upon Stages: Macbeth, Treason and the Theatre of Law I. Compassing or Imagining Regicide II. Of Such Horror, and Monstrous Nature: The Juridical Enactment of Betrayal III. Royal Succession as Theatre of the Whole World IV. Treason and the King's Two Bodies 3. The Winter's Tale: An Art Lawful as Eating I. Law, Literature and Genealogy II. Horticulture, Transformation and the Artifice of Law III. The Nature of Law IV. Inheritance, Gender and the Common Law Tradition V. The Arts of Portraiture and Politics 4. Cymbeline: Empire, Nationhood and the Jacobean Aeneid I. Some Footsteps in the Law II. A Law Inscribed upon the Heart III. Postnati. Calvin's Case and the Journey of Jacobean Law IV. The Divine Purpose, Nature and the Equivocal Image V. The Nationalist Ends of Myth 5. The Tempest: The Island of Law in Jacobean England I. Cannibals, Colonies and the Brave New World II. Utopia and the Legal Imagination III. Enchanted Islands of Common Law.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781509905485 20170321
Through an examination of five plays by Shakespeare, Paul Raffield analyses the contiguous development of common law and poetic drama during the first decade of Jacobean rule. The broad premise of The Art of Law in Shakespeare is that the `artificial reason' of law was a complex art form that shared the same rhetorical strategy as the plays of Shakespeare. Common law and Shakespearean drama of this period employed various aesthetic devices to capture the imagination and the emotional attachment of their respective audiences. Common law of the Jacobean era, as spoken in the law courts, learnt at the Inns of Court and recorded in the law reports, used imagery that would have been familiar to audiences of Shakespeare's plays. In its juridical form, English law was intrinsically dramatic, its adversarial mode of expression being founded on an agonistic model. Conversely, Shakespeare borrowed from the common law some of its most critical themes: justice, legitimacy, sovereignty, community, fairness, and (above all else) humanity. Each chapter investigates a particular aspect of the common law, seen through the lens of a specific play by Shakespeare. Topics include the unprecedented significance of rhetorical skills to the practice and learning of common law (Love's Labour's Lost); the early modern treason trial as exemplar of the theatre of law (Macbeth); the art of law as the legitimate distillation of the law of nature (The Winter's Tale); the efforts of common lawyers to create an image of nationhood from both classical and Judeo-Christian mythography (Cymbeline); and the theatrical device of the island as microcosm of the Jacobean state and the project of imperial expansion (The Tempest).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781509905485 20170321
Law Library (Crown)
vii, 82 pages ; 24 cm
  • Preface
  • What is droit de suite/artist's resale right?
  • The path to European harmonisation
  • The directive
  • Implementation of the directive in the UK : the artist's resale rights reg'ns
  • Practical issues
  • UK artist's resale right from 1st January 2012/death of the artist
  • International aspects
  • Conclusion.
"This new and revised third edition takes stock of over 10 years' experience of artist's resale right (ARR), also called droit de suite, in the UK. As well as offering updated guidance, it also includes a commentary on recent European and international developments and the impact of Brexit on ARR in the UK. ARR gives artists and their heirs a royalty on re-sales of their art works. This intellectual property right, which forms part of copyright law, is originally of French origin and was first introduced into UK law in 2006 to implement the 2001 EU Directive on ARR. ARR remains a right with a strong European focus-it is not currently implemented in a number of significant art markets outside the EU. Nevertheless the establishment in 2006 of an ARR regime in the UK (the second largest global art market), along with EU harmonization of the right, have been influential in encouraging states such as the USA, China, and Switzerland to consider its adoption. This book, first published in 2006, continues to...[examine] the background to the directive, UK ARR and its implementation in the UK. The practical guidance offered is essential to all those with an interest in the operation of the right in the UK-artists, collecting societies/CMOs, art dealers, auction houses, art galleries, collectors, and their legal advisers. The work includes a copy of the ARR Directive and the consolidated UK Artist's Resale Right Regulations."-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)

16. Autumn [2016]

264 pages ; 22 cm.
"Fusing Keatsian mists and mellow fruitfulness with the vitality, the immediacy, and the color hit of Pop Art, Autumn is a witty excavation of the present by the past. The novel is a stripped-branches take on popular culture and a meditation, in a world growing ever more bordered and exclusive, on what richness and worth are, what harvest means."-- Book jacket flap.
Law Library (Crown)
liii, 292 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Balancing decision-making amongst courts and legislatures
  • Judicial review and political responses
  • Comparing political responses in India and the United Kingdom
  • Judicial review in the shadow of remedies
  • Collateral institutions to judicial review
  • Conclusion.
The Human Rights Act (HRA) of the UK, enacted in 1998, provoked particular interest amongst scholars. Unlike systems of parliamentary sovereignty and judicial supremacy, it promised a new, 'balanced' model for the protection of rights, which conferred courts with a limited power of review over legislation. Under this new model, rights-based decision-making was expected to be balanced amongst courts and legislatures, rather than lopsided in favour of either. Indian courts, on the other hand, have always been constitutionally entrusted with the power to strike down primary legislation enacted by the Union and state legislatures. This book examines the promise of the new model against its performance in practice by comparing judicial review under the HRA to an exemplar of the old model of judicial review, the Indian Constitution. It argues that although the HRA fosters a more balanced allocation of powers between legislatures and courts than the Indian Constitution, it does so for a novel reason. Balanced constitutionalism is not achieved through the legislative rejection of judicial decision-making about rights. Instead, the nature of the remedy under the HRA enables British courts to assert their genuine interpretations of rights in situations in which Indian courts find it difficult to do so.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199470587 20170508
Law Library (Crown)
xxxv, 388 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • The rise and fall of Lehman Brothers / Anton R. Valukas, Robert L. Byman, and Daniel R. Murray
  • The liquidation of Lehman Brothers Inc., the New York brokerage of the Lehman global enterprise / Kenneth J. Caputo, James W. Giddens, and Cristopher K. Kiplok
  • Lehman's derivative portfolio : a Chapter 11 perspective / Stephen J. Lubben
  • Lessons from Lehman : forcing a settlement of substantive consolidation / Thomas Moers Mayer and Daniel M. Eggermann
  • Lehman Brothers and equitable subordination in cross-border proceedings / Harrison L. Denman
  • How has English law coped with the Lehman collapse? / The Right Honourable Lord Justice Briggs
  • Extended liens / Hamish Anderson
  • The management and distribution of LBIE's client assets / David Ereira
  • Lessons of LBIE : reuse and rehypothecation / Joanna Benjamin
  • The English law treatment of Lehman's derivatives positions / Simon Firth
  • The scope and application of the anti-deprivation rule / Sarah Worthington
  • The use of a composition plan as a valuation and distribution framework / Dennis Faber, Frédéric Verhoeven, and Niels Vermunt
  • The valuation of LBT notes : an application of Dutch insolvency law / Dennis Faber, Niels Vermunt, Gareth Davies, and Mark Helmantel
  • Derivatives in cross-border insolvency proceedings / Francisco Garcimartín.
"This new book analyses the legal and practical issues experienced during the Lehman Brothers litigation, the largest and most complex bankruptcy proceedings in history. By examining the issues the work provides a useful reference source for future large scale and cross-border bankruptcy proceedings of multinational groups. The author team includes experts from the various jurisdictions in which Lehman Brothers was operative, many of whom were involved in the litigation. The authors set out practical solutions to the issues faced, concerning, for example, the use of existing payment and settlement systems for consent solicitation, and filing instructions and insolvency distributions. Economic challenges, such as the valuation of distressed financial instruments, are also considered. Additionally, the book provides a critique of the current law, analysis of the interpretation and scope of core legal principles and makes recommendations for regulatory reform and judicial cooperation.In this book first-hand accounts by key parties in the insolvency proceedings with expertise on the main issues are complemented by the views of selected independent experts to provide the first complete work on this ground-breaking litigation."-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
lxxii, 571 pages ; 26 cm
  • General introduction: Some problems relating to the role of international law
  • International legal sources I : the United Nations conventions
  • International legal sources II : the United Nations Security Council resolutions
  • International legal sources III : FATF recommendations
  • International legal sources IV : the European Union and the Council of Europe
  • International legal sources V : the UN Security Council delisting procedure
  • Money laundering offences under POCA 2002
  • The terrorism acts and conspiracy
  • UK sanctions regimes
  • Regulatory responsibilities
  • The professions and financial crime
  • Claims arising under UK private law
  • Money had and received
  • Knowing receipt
  • Dishonest assistance
  • Deceit
  • Conspiracy
  • Investigations and remedies under POCA 2002
  • Anti-terrorism legislation
  • Judicial cooperation including obtaining evidence
  • Cooperation between the United States and the United Kingdom in the prevention and prosecution of financial crime
  • Extraterritorial application of US law
  • Virtual currencies, artificial intelligence, and emerging legal questions.
This thoroughly revised and updated new edition provides a practical guide for banks and their lawyers in respect of their regulatory responsibilities, their private law duties, their liabilities to third parties, and their obligations to assist persons seeking the recovery of assets (including regulatory bodies within and without the jurisdiction) as they relate to "tainted money". It also sets the law in its national and international policy context and pays particular attention to the international sources of the relevant law. It draws on the expertise of civil and criminal practitioners, public international lawyers, and overseas (in particular US) lawyers. The second edition addresses recent practice under the main international conventions, including the Sixth Session of the Conference of the Parties to the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (October 2012) and the Fifth Session of the Conference of States Parties to the UN Convention against Corruption (November 2013). UN Security Council Resolutions, in particular resolution 1904 of 17 December 2009 which established the delisting ombudsperson (in response to criticism by national courts), have been considered. The book considers the work of international bodies such as the Financial Action Task Force and new primary legislation at domestic and European level, including the Fourth Money Laundering Directive. Additionally, decisions of the European Court of Human Rights, the Court of Justice of the European Union and national courts are analysed and explained. It also provides a further assessment of the extent to which there has emerged an international law of tainted money to complement the emergence of an international financial system. In a concluding chapter, it gives an overview of the emerging response of courts and regulators (national, EU, and international) to the challenges presented by new technologies such as Bitcoin and other virtual currencies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198716587 20170502
Law Library (Crown)

20. Barristers [2017]

1 videodisc (150 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in. Sound: digital; optical. Digital: video file; DVD video.
A groundbreaking documentary series following some of the UK's leading legal minds. For the first time ever, cameras have access to the working of the British courts. Over fifteen months, they have unprecedented access to the barristers, their cases, and the courts system.
Law Library (Crown)