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Book
viii, 172 pages ; 22 cm.
  • Boycott as tactic : here and there
  • The academic boycott movement
  • Backlash : the boycott and the culture/race wars
  • Academic abolitionism : boycott as decolonization.
This title is part of American Studies Now and available as an e-book first. Visit ucpress.edu/go/americanstudiesnow to learn more. The Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions movement (BDS) has expanded rapidly though controversially in the US in the last five years. The academic boycott of Israeli academic institutions is a key component of that movement. What is this boycott? Why does it make sense? And why is this an American Studies issue? These key questions and others are answered in this essential short book. Boycott! situates the academic boycott in the broader history of boycotts in the US as well as Palestine and shows how it has evolved into a transnational social movement that has spurred profound intellectual and political shifts. It explores the movement's implications for antiracist, feminist, queer, and academic labor organizing and examines the boycott in the context of debates about Palestine, Zionism, race, rights-based politics, academic freedom, decolonization and neoliberal capitalism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520294899 20180129
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxx, 342 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : portraits ; 25 cm
  • Introduction
  • Roots of change : Lucile Blueford's long crusade
  • "This lone negro girl" : Ada Lois Spiuel, desegregation champion
  • Girls on the front line : grassroots challenges in the late 1940s
  • Laying the groundwork : Esther Brown and the struggle in South Park, Kansas
  • "Hearts and minds" : the road to Brown v. Board of Education
  • "Take care of my baby" : the isolation of the first "firsts"
  • "We raised our hands and said 'yes we will go'" : desegregating schools in the mid-1960s
  • Epilogue.
A new history of school desegregation in America, revealing how girls and women led the fight for interracial education The struggle to desegregate America's schools was a grassroots movement, and young women were its vanguard. In the late 1940s, parents began to file desegregation lawsuits with their daughters, forcing Thurgood Marshall and other civil rights lawyers to take up the issue and bring it to the Supreme Court. After the Brown v. Board of Education ruling, girls far outnumbered boys in volunteering to desegregate formerly all-white schools. In A Girl Stands at the Door, historian Rachel Devlin tells the remarkable stories of these desegregation pioneers. She also explains why black girls were seen, and saw themselves, as responsible for the difficult work of reaching across the color line in public schools. Highlighting the extraordinary bravery of young black women, this bold revisionist account illuminates today's ongoing struggles for equality.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781541697331 20180521
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 235 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: Taxpayer citizenship and the right to education
  • A shabby meanness : origins of unequal taxation
  • Let them plow : beyond the black-white paradigm
  • We are taxpaying citizens : separate and colorblind
  • A drain on taxpayers : graduate school segregation and the road to Brown
  • The white man's tax dollar: segregationists and backlash
  • Taxpayers and taxeaters : poverty and the constitution
  • The rich richer and the poor poorer : intersectional claims
  • Conclusion: Education, inequality, and the hidden power of taxes.
In the United States, it is quite common to lay claim to the benefits of society by appealing to ""taxpayer citizenship-the idea that, as taxpayers, we deserve access to certain social services like a public education. Tracing the genealogy of this concept, Camille Walsh shows how tax policy and taxpayer identity were built on the foundations of white supremacy. From the origins of unequal public school funding after the Civil War through school desegregation cases from Brown v. Board of Education to San Antonio v. Rodriguez in the 1970s, this study spans over a century of racial injustice, dramatic courtroom clashes, and white supremacist backlash to collective justice claims. Incorporating letters from everyday individuals as well as the private notes of Supreme Court justices as they deliberated, Walsh reveals how the idea of a ""taxpayer"" identity contributed to the contemporary crises of public education, racial disparity, and income inequality.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469638935 20180508
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 208 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Preface
  • Introduction
  • The mission of a university
  • The tradition of free speech
  • Free speech on campus
  • Ideological ostracism and viewpoint diversity on campus.
Why free speech is the lifeblood of colleges and universities Free speech is under attack at colleges and universities today, with critics on and off campus challenging the value of open inquiry and freewheeling intellectual debate. Too often speakers are shouted down, professors are threatened, and classes are disrupted. In Speak Freely, Keith Whittington argues that universities must protect and encourage free speech because vigorous free speech is the lifeblood of the university. Without free speech, a university cannot fulfill its most basic, fundamental, and essential purposes, including fostering freedom of thought, ideological diversity, and tolerance. Examining such hot-button issues as trigger warnings, safe spaces, hate speech, disruptive protests, speaker disinvitations, the use of social media by faculty, and academic politics, Speak Freely describes the dangers of empowering campus censors to limit speech and enforce orthodoxy. It explains why free speech and civil discourse are at the heart of the university's mission of creating and nurturing an open and diverse community dedicated to learning. It shows why universities must make space for voices from both the left and right. And it points out how better understanding why the university lives or dies by free speech can help guide everyone-including students, faculty, administrators, and alumni-when faced with difficult challenges such as unpopular, hateful, or dangerous speech. Timely and vitally important, Speak Freely demonstrates why universities can succeed only by fostering more free speech, more free thought-and a greater tolerance for both.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691181608 20180416
Law Library (Crown)
Book
228 pages ; 25 cm
  • Changing schools, changing citizens, changing priorities
  • Accountability, the public, and public schools
  • Defining public schools and understanding their shifting terrain
  • Critiquing the changing practices of public school
  • Our schools, our responsibility, our democracy
  • Fulfilling citizen responsibilities
  • Legitimacy of public schools
  • Citizenship education and habits of democracy
  • Educating citizens through and for democracy and our public schools.
Public school systems are central to a flourishing democracy, where children learn how to solve problems together, build shared identities, and come to value justice and liberty for all. However, as citizen support for public schools steadily declines, our democratic way of life is increasingly at risk. Often, we hear about the poor performances of students and teachers in the public school system, but as author Sarah M. Stitzlein asserts in her compelling new volume, the current educational crisis is not about accountability, but rather citizen responsibility. Now, more than ever, citizens increasingly do not feel as though public schools are our schools, forgetting that we have influence over their outcomes and are responsible for their success. In effect, accountability becomes more and more about finding failure and casting blame on our school administrators and teachers, rather than taking responsibility as citizens for shaping our expectations of the classroom, determining the criteria we use to measure its success, and supporting our public schools as they nurture our children for the future. American Public Education and the Responsibility of its Citizens sheds an important light on recent shifts in the link between education and citizenship, helping readers to understand not only how schools now work, but also how citizens can take an active and influential role in shaping them. Moving from philosophical critique of these changes to practical suggestions for action, Stitzlein provides readers with the tools, habits, practices, and knowledge necessary to support public education. Further, by sharing examples of citizens and successful communities that are effectively working with their school systems, Stitzlein offers a torch of hope to sustain citizens through this difficult work in order to keep our democracy strong.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190657383 20170731
Law Library (Crown)
Book
40 pages : color illustrations, color map ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxxv, 332 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: Orientation
  • Planet college, millennial edition
  • Number-one party school
  • A boy's life
  • Carnal knowledge
  • "Rape girls"
  • Rape theory 101
  • The accused
  • Guilty
  • The fixer
  • Adult supervision
  • Phoebe
  • Down with the frats
  • Battleground
  • Appendix: Recommendations.
Draws on research at college and university campuses to explore the topics of sex, consent, and sexual assault, discussing statistics about the prevalence of campus rape, and offering advice on how to make college a safer experience.
"What's really happening behind closed doors on America's college campuses? A new sexual revolution is sweeping the country, and college students are on the front lines. Women use fresh, smart methods to fight entrenched sexism and sexual assault even as they celebrate their own sexuality as never before. Many 'woke' male students are more sensitive to women's concerns than previous generations ever were, while other men perpetuate the most cruel misogyny. Amid such apparent contradictions, it's no surprise that intense confusion shrouds the topic of sex on campus. Vanessa Grigoriadis dispels that confusion as no other writer could by traveling to schools large and small, embedding in their social whirl, and talking candidly with dozens of students--among them, both accusers and accused-- as well as administrators, parents, and researchers. Her unprecedented investigation presents a host of new truths. She reveals which times and settings are most dangerous for women (for instance, beware the 'red zone'); she demystifies the welter of conflicting statistics about the prevalence of campus rape; she makes a strong case that not all 'sexual assault' is equivalent; and she offers convincing if controversial advice on how schools, students, and parents can make college a safer, richer experience. The sum of her fascinating, fly-on-the-wall reportage is a revelatory account of how long-standing rules of sex and power are being rewritten from scratch."-- Jacket.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
22 pages : color charts ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
16 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vii, 370 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • The foundations of the frenzy
  • Misleading through statistics
  • The realities of "rape culture"
  • Denying due process
  • Media malpractice
  • The witch-hunt mentality
  • College athletes : myths and realities
  • The witch hunt intensifies
  • From campus to criminal law
  • A new generation's contempt for civil rights
  • Conclusion.
In recent years, politicians led by President Obama and prominent senators and governors have teamed with extremists on campus to portray our nation's campuses as awash in a violent crime wave and to suggest (preposterously) that university leaders, professors, and students are indifferent to female sexual assault victims in their midst. Neither of these claims has any bearing in reality. But they have achieved widespread acceptance, thanks in part to misleading alarums from the Obama administration and biased media coverage led by the New York Times.The frenzy about campus rape has helped stimulate and has been fanned by ideologically skewed campus sexual assault policies and lawless commands issued by federal bureaucrats to force the nation's all-too-compliant colleges and universities essentially to presume the guilt of accused students. The result has been a widespread disregard of such bedrock American principles as the presumption of innocence and the need for fair play.This book uses hard facts to set the record straight. It explores, among other things, about two dozen of the many cases since 2010 in which innocent or probably innocent students have been branded as sex criminals and expelled or otherwise punished by their colleges. And it shows why all students and, eventually, society as a whole are harmed when our nation's universities abandon pursuit of truth and seek instead to accommodate the passions of the mob.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781594038853 20170821
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vii, 370 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • The foundations of the frenzy
  • Misleading through statistics
  • The realities of "rape culture"
  • Denying due process
  • Media malpractice
  • The witch-hunt mentality
  • College athletes : myths and realities
  • The witch hunt intensifies
  • From campus to criminal law
  • A new generation's contempt for civil rights
  • Conclusion.
In recent years, politicians led by President Obama and prominent senators and governors have teamed with extremists on campus to portray our nation's campuses as awash in a violent crime wave and to suggest (preposterously) that university leaders, professors, and students are indifferent to female sexual assault victims in their midst. Neither of these claims has any bearing in reality. But they have achieved widespread acceptance, thanks in part to misleading alarums from the Obama administration and biased media coverage led by the New York Times.The frenzy about campus rape has helped stimulate and has been fanned by ideologically skewed campus sexual assault policies and lawless commands issued by federal bureaucrats to force the nation's all-too-compliant colleges and universities essentially to presume the guilt of accused students. The result has been a widespread disregard of such bedrock American principles as the presumption of innocence and the need for fair play.This book uses hard facts to set the record straight. It explores, among other things, about two dozen of the many cases since 2010 in which innocent or probably innocent students have been branded as sex criminals and expelled or otherwise punished by their colleges. And it shows why all students and, eventually, society as a whole are harmed when our nation's universities abandon pursuit of truth and seek instead to accommodate the passions of the mob.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781594038853 20170821
Law Library (Crown)
Book
122 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: The controversy over controversial issues
  • Historical reflections: teacher freedom and controversial issues
  • Philosophical reflections : exploring the ideal of teaching controversial issues
  • Conclusion: Policy and practice in teaching controversial issues.
From the fights about the teaching of evolution to the details of sex education, it may seem like American schools are hotbeds of controversy. But as Jonathan Zimmerman and Emily Robertson show in this insightful book, it is precisely because such topics are so inflammatory outside school walls that they are so commonly avoided within them. And this, they argue, is a tremendous disservice to our students. Armed with a detailed history of the development of American educational policy and norms and a clear philosophical analysis of the value of contention in public discourse, they show that one of the best things American schools should do is face controversial topics dead on, right in their classrooms. Zimmerman and Robertson highlight an aspect of American politics that we know all too well: We are terrible at having informed, reasonable debates. We opt instead to hurl insults and accusations at one another or, worse, sit in silence and privately ridicule the other side. Wouldn't an educational system that focuses on how to have such debates in civil and mutually respectful ways improve our public culture and help us overcome the political impasses that plague us today? To realize such a system, the authors argue that we need to not only better prepare our educators for the teaching of hot-button issues, but also provide them the professional autonomy and legal protection to do so. And we need to know exactly what constitutes a controversy, which is itself a controversial issue. The existence of climate change, for instance, should not be subject to discussion in schools: scientists overwhelmingly agree that it exists. How we prioritize it against other needs, such as economic growth, however that is worth a debate. With clarity and common-sense wisdom, Zimmerman and Robertson show that our squeamishness over controversy in the classroom has left our students woefully underserved as future citizens. But they also show that we can fix it: if we all just agree to disagree, in an atmosphere of mutual respect.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226456348 20170612
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 274 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • AcknowledgmentsIntroduction1. The Wizard of Ed2. Rupert and the Chancellor: A Tragic Love Story3. Curious George Schools: John Paulson4. Michael Milken: Master of the Knowledge Universe5. What Makes a Good Education Business?6. Lessons from Clown SchoolNotesIndex.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231179287 20170117
The past thirty years have seen dozens of otherwise successful investors try to improve education through the application of market principles. They have funneled billions of dollars into alternative schools, online education, and textbook publishing, and they have, with surprising regularity, lost their shirts. In Class Clowns, professor and investment banker Jonathan A. Knee dissects what drives investors' efforts to improve education and why they consistently fail. Knee takes readers inside four spectacular financial failures in education: Rupert Murdoch's billion-dollar effort to reshape elementary education through technology; the unhappy investors-including hedge fund titan John Paulson-who lost billions in textbook publisher Houghton Mifflin; the abandonment of Knowledge Universe, Michael Milken's twenty-year mission to revolutionize the global education industry; and a look at Chris Whittle, founder of EdisonLearning and a pioneer of large-scale transformational educational ventures, who continues to attract investment despite decades of financial and operational disappointment. Although deep belief in the curative powers of the market drove these initiatives, it was the investors' failure to appreciate market structure that doomed them. Knee asks: What makes a good education business? By contrasting rare successes, he finds a dozen broad lessons at the heart of these cautionary case studies. Class Clowns offers an important guide for public policy makers and guardrails for future investors, as well as an intelligent expos for activists and teachers frustrated with the repeated underperformance of these attempts to shake up education.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231179287 20170117
Law Library (Crown)
Book
24 pages : color illustration ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
40 pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm
  • Shifting demographics
  • Migration mindset
  • Future of college admissions.
"This report explores the trends and strategies in enrollment that college teachers need to understand as they approach the decade ahead, including: demographics, migration patterns, and the changing admissions function."-- Page 4.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
28 pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 352 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Preface
  • First letters home
  • Beat Cal
  • History at the Farm
  • Student life in the main
  • Letters from the overseas campuses
  • Resilience
  • Ruminations
  • Final letters home
  • Snapshots from the Quad.
"[This book], a collection of the hand-written and electronic correspondence of generations of Stanford students, recalls the common human experience of breaking out and trying to find our way as we observe the world around us and look over a shoulder toward home. From first letters home freshman year and firsthand accounts of historical events to questions about self and questions about laundry, these letters, emails, and texts evoke a sense of the heritage, history, and shared experience common to college students everywhere, and Stanford students in particular. Walk the Quad with Lucy, member of the Pioneer Class, who headed west to Stanford in 1891, and Laine, feisty member of the Class of 2016. Live history as Hope celebrates the end of World War l, throw snowballs in the Quad with Elaine in 1962, celebrate with Burnham when he makes the newspaper staff on his second try in 1923, root for the Cardinal-er, Trees? at yet another Big Game, name the year. [This book] asks us to explore what Stanford is, has been, and can be to ourselves and to others and to reflect on how it matters to us still. From desks, benches, and patches of grass across campus and the decades, Stanford's students challenge, engage, and inspire you just like the gang back in the dorm. One person's correspondence tells one Stanford story. Together, they tell all of ours."-- Book jacket.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
24 pages : color illustrations, color map ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)

19. Rosenwald [2017]

Video
2 videodiscs (96 min.) : color, black and white, sound ; 4 3/4 in. + 1 booklet (1 volume (unpaged) : illustrations ; 19 cm) Sound: digital; optical. Video: NTSC. Digital: video file; DVD video; all regions.
"Rosenwald is the incredible story of how businessman and philanthropist Julius Rosenwald joined forces with Booker T. Washington and African American communities in the segregationist Jim Crow South to build more than 5000 schools. Inspired by the Jewish doctrine of 'tikkun olam,' repairing the world, and a deep concern over racial inequality in America, the Rosenwald Fund supported major African-American artists and intellectuals, like Marian Anderson, W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes, Jacob Lawrence, and Gordon Parks. This unprecedented historical partnership impacted American culture for generations and continues to inspire today."-- Container.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvi, 171 pages ; 22cm
  • Foreword / Alberto Ibargüen
  • Introduction
  • Flashpoints
  • The case for diversity
  • The case for free expression
  • The hard problem of hate speech
  • Free press and freedom of assembly
  • Why the diversity and free expression debate matters.
How the essential democratic values of diversity and free expression can coexist on campus.Safe spaces, trigger warnings, microagressions, the disinvitation of speakers, demands to rename campus landmarks -- debate over these issues began in lecture halls and on college quads but ended up on op-ed pages in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, on cable news, and on social media. Some of these critiques had merit, but others took a series of cheap shots at "crybullies" who needed to be coddled and protected from the real world. Few questioned the assumption that colleges must choose between free expression and diversity. In Safe Spaces, Brave Spaces, John Palfrey argues that the essential democratic values of diversity and free expression can, and should, coexist on campus. Palfrey, currently Head of School at Phillips Academy, Andover, and formerly Professor and Vice Dean at Harvard Law School, writes that free expression and diversity are more compatible than opposed. Free expression can serve everyone -- even if it has at times been dominated by white, male, Christian, heterosexual, able-bodied citizens. Diversity is about self-expression, learning from one another, and working together across differences; it can encompass academic freedom without condoning hate speech.Palfrey proposes an innovative way to support both diversity and free expression on campus: creating safe spaces and brave spaces. In safe spaces, students can explore ideas and express themselves with without feeling marginalized. In brave spaces -- classrooms, lecture halls, public forums -- the search for knowledge is paramount, even if some discussions may make certain students uncomfortable. The strength of our democracy, says Palfrey, depends on a commitment to upholding both diversity and free expression, especially when it is hardest to do so.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262037143 20171023
Law Library (Crown)