Book
256 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps, portraits ; 24 cm
The life of the Bavarian Hans Frank, one of the ten war criminals hanged at Nuremburg in 1946, who converted to Catholicism before he died, has not received the full attention the world has given to other Nazi leaders. In many ways he warrants it more. His life symbolises Germany's hubristic and visionary ambition to an alarming degree much better than anyone else's, perhaps because he was an intellectual of the highest calibre: 'Can't they see, ' he said of his fellow accused at Nuremberg, 'that this is a horrible tragedy in the history of mankind, and that we are the symbols of an evil that God is brushing aside?' As he recognised by the end he was a primary - if not the exemplary - symbol of evil, his remorse, self-pity, and arrogance knew no bounds as they vied with his contrition. Author Garry O'Connor brings his skills as a playwright, biographer and novelist to this harrowing account of Histler's lawyer, the man who formalised the Nazi race laws.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780752498133 20160612
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vii, 199 p. : ill ; 23 cm.
  • Arendt and the trial of Adolf Eichmann : contextualizing the debate
  • Ideology and atrocity
  • Thoughtlessness and evil
  • "Crimes against the human status" : Nuremberg and the image of evil
  • The banality of evil.
Taking Hannah Arendt's provocative and polarizing account of the 1961 trial of Nazi official Adolf Eichmann as its point of departure, Visualizing Atrocity reassesses the myths that have come to shape and limit our understanding of the Nazi genocide as well as totalitarianism's broader, constitutive, and recurrent features. These myths are inextricably tied to the atrocity imagery that emerged with the liberation of the concentration camps and played an especially important, evidentiary role in the post-war trials of perpetrators. At the 1945 Nuremberg Tribunal, particular practices of looking were first established, and later reinforced and institutionalized through Eichmann's trial in Jerusalem as simply part of the fabric of historical fact. These ways of seeing have come to constitute a certain visual rhetoric that drives contemporary mythmaking about how we know genocide and what is permitted to count as such. In contrast, Arendt's claims about the "banality of evil" work to disrupt this visual rhetoric. More significantly still, they direct our attention well beyond the figure of Eichmann to a world organized now as then by practices and processes that, while designed to sustain and even enhance life, work as well to efface it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780814738498 20160608
Law Library (Crown)

3. Bismarck : a life [2011]

Book
x, 577 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps, ports. ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Introduction-- 2. Born Prussian and What that Meant-- 3. The 'Mad Junker'-- 4. Bismarck Represents Himself, 1847 to 1851-- 5. Bismarck as Diplomat 1851-1862-- 6. Power-- 7. 'I have beaten them all! All!'-- 8. The Unification of Germany 1866 to 1870-- 9. The Decline Begins: Liberals and Catholics-- 10. 'The Guest House of the Dead Jew'-- 11. Three Kaisers and Bismarck's Fall from Power-- 12. Conclusion: Bismarck and His Legacy-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199599011 20160603
This is the life story of one of the most interesting human beings who ever lived. A political genius who remade Europe and united Germany between 1862 and 1890 by the sheer power of his great personality. It takes the reader into close proximity with a human being of almost superhuman abilities. We see him through the eyes of his secretaries, his old friends, his neighbours, his enemies and the press. Otto von Bismarck 'made' Germany but never 'ruled' it. For twenty eight years he acted as a prime minister without a party. He made speeches, brilliant in content but hesitant in delivery, and rarely addressed a public meeting. He planned three wars and after a certain stage in his career always wore military uniform to which he had no claim. The 'Iron Chancellor', the image of Prussian militarism, suffered from hypochondria and hysteria. Contemporaries called him a 'dictator' and several observers credited him with 'demonic' powers'. They were not wrong. The sheer power of his remarkable 'sovereign sel' awed even his enemies. William I observed that it was hard to be emperor under a man like Bismarck. He towered physically and intellectually over his contemporaries. His spoken and written prose sparkled with wit, insight, grand visions and petty malice. He united Germany and transformed Europe like Napoleon before and Hitler after him but with neither their control of the state nor command of great armies. He was and remained a royal servant. This new biography explores the greatness and limits of a huge and ultimately destructive self. It uses the diaries and letters of his contemporaries to explore the most remarkable figure of the nineteenth century, a man who never said a dull thing or wrote a slack sentence. A political genius who combined creative and destructive traits, generosity and pettiness, tolerance and ferocious enmity, courtesy and rudeness - in short, not only the most important nineteenth-century statesman but by far the most entertaining.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199599011 20160603
Law Library (Crown)
Book
461 p. : ill.; 22 cm.
  • Staat und Gesellschaft : Ein historischer Abriss
  • Ein Blick in die Zunkunft : Realitäten und Wunschvorstellungen
  • Zeichen des Verfalls : Eine Bestandsaufnahme
  • Armut und Ungleichheit : Viele gute Absichten, wenig Mut zur Wahrheit
  • Arbeit und Politik : Über Leistungsbereitschaft und Arbeitsanreize
  • Bildung und Gerechtigkeit : Über den Unterschied von gut und gut gemeint
  • Zuwanderung und Integration : Mehr erwarten, weniger bieten
  • Demografie und Bevölkerungspolitik : Mehr Kinder von den Klungen, bevor es zu spät ist
  • Ein Traum und ein Alptraum : Deutschland in 100 Jahren.
Law Library (Crown)

5. Rick Steves' Germany [2009 - ]

Journal/Periodical
v. : ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 21 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 308 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Citizenship and national identity in twentieth-century Germany / Geoff Eley, Jan Palmowski --Citizenship in Germany and France at the turn of the twentieth-century: some new observations on an old comparison / Dieter Gosewinkel
  • The citizen and the republic in Germany / Peter C. Caldwell
  • Culture, belonging, and the law: naturalization in the Weimar republic / Annemarie Sammartino
  • Citizenship, identity, and community in the German democratic republic / Jan Palmowski
  • The citizen at home: Wohnkultur before World War I / Jennifer Jenkins
  • From the chopped-off hand to the twisted foot: citizenship and police violence in twentieth-century Germany / Thomas Lindenberger
  • Body biological to body politic: women's demands for reproductive self-determination in World War I and early Weimar Germany / Cornelie Usborne
  • Creating the Nazi marketplace: public relations and consumer citizenship in the Third Reich / S. Jonathan Wiesen
  • "Gesungen oder musiziert wird aber fast in jedem Haus": representing and constructing citizenship through music in twentieth-century Germany / Toby Thaker
  • Conceptualizing citizenship as a biopolitical category from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries / Pascal Grosse
  • Citizenship in twentieth-century German history: chances and challenges of a concept / Adelheid von Saldern
  • Reflections on the vocabulary of citizenship in twentieth-century Germany / Kathleen Canning
  • Some general thoughts on citizenship in Germany / Geoff Eley.
This book is one of the first to use citizenship as a lens through which to understand German history in the twentieth century. By considering how Germans defined themselves and others, the book explores how nationality and citizenship rights were constructed, and how Germans defined - and contested - their national community over the century. The volume presents new research informed by cultural, political, legal, and institutional history to obtain a fresh understanding of German history in a century marked by traumatic historical ruptures. By investigating a concept that has been widely discussed in the social sciences, "Citizenship and National Identity in Twentieth-Century Germany" engages with scholarly debates in sociology, anthropology, and political science.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804752046 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
458 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
Becoming Eichmann, the first account of Eichmanns life to appear in over forty years, reveals a surprising portrait of the man once seen as epitomizing the banality of evil. Drawing on recently unearthed documents, David Cesarani explores Eichmanns early career, when he learned how to become an administrator of genocide, and shows how Eichmann developed into the Reichs expert on Jewish matters, becoming ever more hateful and brutal. This sobering account deepens our understanding and challenges our preconceptions of Adolf Eichmann and offers fresh insights into both the operation of the Final Solution and its most notorious perpetrator.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780306815393 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
108 pages : color illustrations ; 23 x 24 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 195 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 159 p., [6] p. of plates : ill. ; 22 cm.
"What Hitler Knew" is a study of how the climate of fear in Nazi Germany affected Hitler's advisers and shaped the decision making process. It explores the key foreign policy decisions from the Nazi seizure of power up to the hours before the outbreak of World War II. Zachary Shore argues that the tense environment led the diplomats to a nearly obsessive control over the "information arsenal" in a desperate battle to defend their positions and to safeguard their lives. The book draws the reader into the diplomats' darker world and illustrates how Hitler's power to make informed decisions was limited by the very system he created. The result, Shore concludes, was a chaotic flow of information between Hitler and his advisers that may have accelerated the march toward war.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195154597 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
165 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xix, 244 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Preface-- Glossary-- Note-- Part I. Introduction on Judging the East German Past: 1. Interpreting East Germany's history-- 2. Four types of retrospective justice-- Part II. Criminal Justice: Prosecuting GDR Officials: 3. Competing arguments for justice-- 4. Seeking justice within the law-- 5. A 'trial of the century'-- 6. Judicial architects of German unity-- 7. The risks of going too far-- 8. An ambiguous message about culpability-- Part IV. Disqualifying Justice: Searching for Stasi Collaborators: 9. Contending views on the Stasi's reach-- 10. Level one: distilling truth from the files-- 11. Level two: screening for Stasi activity-- 12. Level three: appealing dismissals before the courts-- 13. The competing messages of screening-- Part V. Moral Justice: Assessing the Complete Record of Dictatorship: 14. Finding fault with the churches-- 15. A different stand on the Deutschlandpolitik-- 16. Mixed emotions about the silent majority-- 17. Revisiting East Germany's difficult past-- 18. A better commission?-- Part VI. Corrective Justice: Returning Private Property: 19. The narrow choices behind the property settlement-- 20. The challenge of implementing the property statute-- The legitimacy of Jewish claims ...-- 21. ... But the irreversibility of Soviet expropriations-- 22. Vying responses to GDR-era injustice-- 23. The ambiguities of drawing the line: an enduring burden of multiple pasts-- Part VII. Conclusion: A Manageable Past? 24. The FRG's constrained options-- 25. Judging the past in the right way-- GDR wrongdoing in perspective-- 26. Contending venues of justice.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521802086 20160528
In recent years, no modern democracy has taken more aggressive steps to come to terms with a legacy of dictatorship than has the Federal Republic of Germany with the crimes and injustices of Communist East Germany. In this book, A. James McAdams provides a comprehensive and engaging examination of the four most prominent instances of this policy: criminal trials for the killings at the Berlin Wall; the disqualification of administrative personnel for secret-police ties; parliamentary truth-telling commissions; and private property restitution. On the basis of extensive interviews in Bonn and Berlin over the 1990s, McAdams gives new insight into the difficulties German politicians, judges, bureaucrats, and public officials faced sitting in judgment on the affairs of another state. He argues provocatively that the success of their policies must be measured in terms of the way they used East German history to justify their actions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521802086 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
310 p. ; 24 cm.
How did German intellectuals react to unification and how do they conceive the country's national identity? This work examines changing notions of nationhood and their relationship to the Nazi past, and charts the history of the development of German political thought since World War II.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300083880 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xlvi, 1115 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
239 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 279 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
652 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
192 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
127 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
l, 642 p. : 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)