Book
10 p. : all col. ill. ; 13 x 19 cm.
Each car on the train has one more zoo animal than the one before, from the first car with an elephant to the last with ten birds.
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 29 cm.
A child learns to count with the help of a classic nursery rhyme.
Education Library (Cubberley)

3. 1 is one [1956]

Book
1 v. (various pagings) : col. ill. ; 19 x 24 cm.
"1 is one duckling swimming in a dish 2 is two sisters making a wish" ""There will, of course, always be children who must learn to count. Teach them also to enjoy the process and to count those things that are most important to them. Eighteen stars twinkling in the sky and twelve baby birds learning how to sing are an excellent start."" Tasha Tudor.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780689828430 20160605
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 21 cm.
  • passage 1. Poverty-a ray of light
  • passage 2. HIV/AIDS-first love
  • passage 3. Global warming-the lagoon of the vanishing fish
  • passage 4. Child solders-of boys and men
  • passage 5. Girls' education-life lessons - -passage 6. Corruption-broken trust.
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
xiv, 134 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
xii, 242 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • Introduction Context Code First or Meaning First Tools in Your Teaching Toolbox Audience Section I. Understanding the Reading Process Chapter 1. Creating Meaning With Print: The Neurocognitive Model Understanding Reading Reading: A Neurological Perspective The Neurocognitive Process Last Word Chapter 2. Eye Movement and Neural Pathways Eye Movement During Reading Understanding Our Learning Organ Last Word Chapter 3. Understanding Reading From a Cognitive Perspective The Difference Between Brain and Mind The Information Processing Model The Two-Way Flow of Information Last Word Section II. Diagnosing Reading Problems, Documenting Progress, and Planning Instruction Chapter 4. Diagnosis and Documentation Diagnosing the Problem Graded Word Lists Graded Reading Passages Assessing Comprehension Putting It Together Last Word Chapter 5. Reading Lessons SRE Lesson Guided Reading Lesson Shared Reading Lesson Last Word Section III. 10 Instructional Elements Chapter 6. 10 Elements of Reading Instruction No Magical Programs Comprehensive Reading Instruction Teaching Reading With the Brain in Mind Last Word Chapter 7. Emergent Literacy: Concepts of Print and Phonemic Awareness Approaches to Early Literacy Instruction Creating the Conditions for Early Literacy Learning Concepts of Print Phonemic-Phonics Hybrid Activities Last Word Chapter 8. Emotions and Motivation Emotions The Value-Expectancy Theory of Motivation Some Basic Strategies Last Word Chapter 9. Literature and Instructional Approaches Strategies for Promoting Voluntary Reading Instructional Approaches Last Word Chapter 10. Phonics Fawnix 14 Strategies Last Word Appendix: Phonics Checklist Chapter 11. Strategies for Developing Word Identification Skills Terms and Concepts Related to Word Identification Context Clues: The Semantic Cueing System Word Order and Grammar: The Syntactic-Cueing System Word Parts Morphemic Analysis Sight Words Last Word Chapter 12. Fluency Reading Fluency Neural Pathways and Networks Strategies for Enhancing Reading Fluency Avoid Round-Robin Reading Last Word Chapter 13. Comprehension of Narrative Text Comprehension Basics Teaching Tips Activities Organized by Cognitive Process Last Word Chapter 14. Comprehension of Expository Text Expository Text Teacher Pre-Reading Strategies Study-Skill Strategies Pedagogical Strategies to Develop Cognitive Processes Related to Comprehension Last Word Chapter 15. Vocabulary Attending to Vocabulary General Principles for Developing Students' Vocabulary Strategies for Developing Students' Vocabulary Visual Displays and Graphic Organizers Last Word About Words Chapter 16. Writing The Why and How of Writing Specific Strategies Last Word Epilogue.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781483373775 20160619
This book is the definitive resource on how the brain creates meaning from print, and is indispensible for educators seeking fresh solutions for students struggling with reading. Drawing from five key areas of neurocognitive research, Andrew Johnson provides a ten-point teaching strategy that encompasses vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, writing and more.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781483373775 20160619
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
xxix, 235 p. ; 24 cm.
10 Great Curricula is a collection of stories written by educators who have come to understand curricula differently as a result of their engagement with a graduate course and its instructor. The book represents the best of what can be found in teaching and learning, in general, and in the quest for meaningful ways to understand curricula in particular. The co-authors of this volume on "10 Great Curricula" framed their inquiries into progressive, democratic curricula, at least initially, through Marsh and Willis' (2007) notions of planned, enacted, and lived curricula. These frames helped the writers think about how to engage a curriculum as it is developed, delivered, and lived by its participants, and for the inquirers to actually become participantinquirers in the curriculum at hand. The chapters depict the power, the possibility, and the transformational potential of "great" progressive curricula today by locating them in schools and in the community, by making them come alive to the reader, and by suggesting means through which the reader can adopt a more progressive, democratic stance to curriculum despite the seemingly overwhelming nature of the conservative, traditionalist, instrumentalist movements in curriculum, teaching, and assessment today. The book is intended for students of education, teaching, and curriculum, undergraduates, graduates, and practicing educational professionals, especially those looking for examples in the world in which progressive, democratic ideals are nurtured and practiced.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781617356124 20160607
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
ix, 84 pages ; 23 cm
In this provocative and practical book, author Eric Nadelstern provides a proven-effective blueprint for narrowing the achievement gap in our schools, especially for children of colour who have been historically underserved. The author, one of the chief architects of the New York City reforms under Joel Klein, discusses the cutting-edge changes that were implemented in the last decade in NYC and identifies the ten most important lessons learned about whole-school-system improvement. In this last decade, NYC's public schools underwent extensive reforms that increased graduation rates by 30% the first significant increase in more than 50 years. For the first time, this book presents an insider's view of the "Bloomberg-Klein years" and the reforms that transformed the nation's largest school system. 10 Lessons from New York City Schools is a must-read for those who believe schools can succeed and for all those who want to understand how.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780807754498 20160612
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 31 cm.
When a storm strikes a cargo ship, ten rubber ducks are tossed overboard and swept off in ten different directions. Based on a factual incident.
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
xviii, 245 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Austin Independent School District, TX (AISD)
  • Fairfax County Public Schools, VA (FCPS)
  • Farmington Public Schools, MI (FPS)
  • Harrison School District Two, CO (HSD2)
  • Madison Local School District, OH (MLSD)
  • Northwest Tri-Country Intermediate Unit #5, PA (IU5)
  • Tillamook School District #9, OR (TSD9)
  • Tippecanoe School Corporation, IN (TSC)
  • Washoe County School District, NV (WCSD)
  • Winnisquam Regional School District SAU 59, NH (WRSD)
  • Conclusion: Looking to the future
  • Appendix A: Helpful forms
  • Appendix B: Comparison of teacher evaluation models : proportionality of elements contributing to teacher evaluation
  • Appendix C: Breakthrough questions.
For the first time, school districts around the country are being required to adopt formal accountability measures to assess teacher effectiveness. In a radical shift, teacher quality will be based on outputs (student achievement; teacher observations) rather than inputs (years of service; degrees attained). This change in school culture and practice is an attempt to improve everything from individual student learning to national economic competitiveness. It also requires that administrators implement new and rigorous teacher evaluation programs that align with state and federal guidelines. Busy administrators lack the training and experience necessary to quickly and efficiently craft a teacher evaluation system that successfully meets the needs of their district. Questions like "What is the best program for my district?" or "How do I get the teachers on-board?" are being asked by school leaders across the country. This book provides real-world answers by highlighting 10 diverse model programs from around the country.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781475801569 20160612
Education Library (Cubberley)

11. 10 Short plays [1963]

Book
352 p. ; 18 cm.
  • Coming through the rye, by W. Saroyan.--The case of the crushed petunias, by T. Williams.--The happy journey to Trenton and Camden, by T. Wilder.--Suppressed desires, by S. Glaspell.--The triumph of the egg, by S. Anderson.--The feast of Ortolans, by M. Anderson.--Quare medicine, by P. Green.--Parents are people (a guidance play), by M.J. Weiss.--My client Curley (a radio play), by N. Corwin.--Visit to a small planet (a television play), by G. Vidal.
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
53 pages ; 20 cm.
  • Understand the impetus for change
  • Clarify positions and interests
  • Do a task analysis (or turn interests into targets?)
  • Gather data (or seize control of data?)
  • Build a force field
  • Frame your efforts, categorize potential actions
  • Choose high impact actions
  • Decide who does what
  • Put together an action plan
  • Encore : pitfalls to avoid.
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
xiii, 287 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Whether writing a blog entry or a high-stakes test essay, fiction or nonfiction, short story or argumentation, students need to know certain things in order to write effectively. In "10 Things Every Writer Needs to Know, " Jeff Anderson focuses on developing the concepts and application of ten essential aspects of good writing--motion, models, focus, detail, form, frames, cohesion, energy, words, and clutter.Throughout the book, Jeff provides dozens of model texts, both fiction and nonfiction, that bring alive the ten things every writer needs to know. By analyzing strong mentor texts, young writers learn what is possible and experiment with the strategies professional writers use. Students explore, discover, and apply what makes good writing work. Jeff dedicates a chapter to each of the ten things every writer needs to know and provides mini-lessons, mentor texts, writing process strategies, and classroom tips that will motivate students to confidently and competently take on any writing task.With standardized tests and Common Core Curriculum influencing classrooms nationwide, educators must stay true to what works in writing instruction. "10 Things Every Writer Needs to Know" keeps teachers on track--encouraging, discovering, inspiring, reminding, and improving writing through conversation, inquiry, and the support of good writing behaviors.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781571108104 20160607
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
xx, 224 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
xx, 227 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
151 p.
Education Library (Cubberley)

17. 100 anos UFAM [2009]

Book
390 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
xiv, 217 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • About the Authors Introduction Chapter One. General Questions 1. Why do I have to learn mathematics? 2. Is there a language connection between mathematical terms and common English words? 3. How many leaves are on a tree? 4. Why do we have to learn about the history of mathematics? 5. Who introduced the Hindu-Arabic numbers to the Western world, and when? 6. What are the three famous problems of antiquity? 7. What are the Fibonacci numbers? 8. What is the golden ratio? 9. Is there a smallest number, and is there a largest number? 10. Why is infinity not a number? 11. How large is infinity? 12. Is there anything larger than infinity? 13. Can the union of two sets ever be equal to the intersection of the two sets? 14. How can we determine how many subsets a given set has? 15. How can we avoid making an error in a "proof" that leads to a generalization? 16. How does a calculator function? 17. Which is correct--my calculating, the calculator, or the computer? 18. What are conic sections? 19. What is a mathematical group? 20. What is a mathematical ring? 21. What is a mathematical field? 22. What are the three famous laws that Johannes Kepler discovered about planetary motion involving the ellipse? Notes Chapter Two. Arithmetic Questions 23. What is the difference between a number and a digit? 24. What are the differences between cardinal, ordinal, and nominal numbers? 25. What are the natural numbers, and does the number zero belong to the natural numbers? 26. How can we remember the order of operations using PEMDAS? 27. What is a fraction? 28. What is a rational number? 29. How can one convert a decimal number to a fraction? 30. What is so special about the Pascal triangle? 31. How can the product of two numbers be smaller than both of its factors? 32. If the temperature rises from 80 degrees F to a temperature of 88 degrees F, why is it wrong to say it became 10% warmer? 33. How do the values of the following differ? (order of operations) 34. Why is division by zero not permissible? 35. Why is x multiplied by 0 = 0? 36. What is 0!? 37. What is the largest number that can be represented in the decimal system with three digits (and without using any other symbols)? 38. What is a prime number? 39. Does the number 1 belong to the prime numbers? 40. How many prime numbers are there? 41. What is a palindrome? 42. What are successive percentages? Notes Chapter Three. Algebra Questions 43. Why is the product of two negative numbers positive? 44. Why must a and b be positive in order for the following to hold true? 45. Why is it advantageous to rationalize the denominator? 46. What is meant by the "absolute value" of a variable? 47. What is a variable? A term? An expression? An equation? 48. How can we have students realize that the average of rates is not simply the arithmetic mean? 49. Why does 0.99999 ... = 1? 50. Is a road with a slope of 20% twice as steep as a road with a 10% slope? 51. Is there a number that differs from its reciprocal by 1? 52. What is a determinant, and how can it be used to solve a system of linear equations? 53. How do the arithmetic, geometric, and harmonic means compare in magnitude? 54. What is a function? 55. What is meant by the inverse of a function? 56. Can a function be equal to its inverse? 57. What is a 1-1 onto function? 58. Where does the quadratic formula come from? 59. What is a parabola? 60. How can you find the turning point of a parabola? 61. What is an ellipse? 62. What is a hyperbola? 63. When does one use the Law of Sines? 64. When does one use the Law of Cosines? 65. What is the difference between y = arccos x and y = cos-1 x? 66. What is a vector? 67. Why can a vector not be divided by a vector? 68. What is i? 69. What is e? Notes Chapter Four. Geometry Questions 70. Why is the diagonal of a square longer than its side? 71. How can you demonstrate that the circumference of a circle is 2 pi r? 72. How can you demonstrate that the area of a circle is equal to pi r squared? 73. Can a triangle contain two right angles? 74. Why must the sum of any two sides of a triangle be greater than the third side? 75. How do the terms "acute angle" and "obtuse angle" relate to the English language? 76. Can trigonometry be used to prove the Pythagorean theorem? 77. How is the distance formula derived? 78. How can the Pythagorean theorem be used to determine if an angle of a triangle is acute or obtuse? 79. What is a Platonic solid? 80. What is a golden rectangle? 81. What is a golden triangle? 82. From which point in a triangle is the sum of the distances to the three vertices smallest? 83. What is the sum of the distances from a point in a triangle to its three sides? 84. What is President James A. Garfield's proof of the Pythagorean theorem? 85. What is the nine-point circle? 86. How can the Pythagorean theorem be proved by paper folding? 87. How can we prove that the sum of the measures of the angles of any triangle is 180 degrees using paper folding? 88. What figure is created by joining the midpoints of any quadrilateral? 89. How can the concurrency of the medians of a triangle be proved in one step? Notes Chapter Five. Probability Questions 90. What is the fundamental principle of counting? 91. What does it mean when the probability of an event is 1? Is 0? 92. What are mutually exclusive events? 93. What is the probability of either or both of two events happening? 94. What is the difference between combinations and permutations? 95. What is the difference between correlation and causation? 96. What is the Pascal triangle? 97. What is binomial probability? 98. What is the birthday problem? 99. How can algebra help us to understand a probability question? 100. What kind of averages are batting averages? Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781452243085 20160612
Anticipate common math questions, eliminate pat responses, and provide explanations that are certain to engage and motivate students. Al Posamentier and his coauthors have all the answers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781452243085 20160612
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
46 p. ; 24 cm.
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
xl, 134 p. : ill. ; 29 cm.
  • Preface Acknowledgments About the Authors Introduction Matrices NCSS McRel 1. Creating a Language 2. Point-of-View Pictures 3. Rosie the Riveter 4. Columbus and the Discovery of the New World 5. How Is History Portrayed? Columbus and the Discovery of the New World 6. Spanglish 7. Slave Narratives 8. The Paradox of Theseus's Ship 9. Creating an Personal Historical Timeline 10. Poems Inspired by Art 11. Art Inspired by Poetry 12. The Paradox of Infinity 13. Point of View and Cultural Perspectives 14. Final Flight of Yamamoto: Should We Have Struck Back? 15. Double Consciousness: Examining Oneself and the Concept of Privilege 16. The Fable of the Blind Men and the Elephant 17. Creating a System of Writing 18. Magic and Technology 19. The Birthday Paradox 20. Mobius Strip and Different Perspectives 21. Thinking Out of the Paradigm: The Columbus Egg Problem 22. Arthur C. Clarke's First Law 23. Is Technology Neutral? 24. Writing a Letter to the Editor 25. Science Fiction and Literature as the Future 26. Creating a Political Broadside 27. Exploring the Great Depression 28. Family Photographs 29. Women's Rights 30. Today in History 31. Photographs of the Farm Security Administration 32. Primary and Secondary Sources 33. Thinking Outside the Box 34. Riddles 35. Exploring Community Festivals 36. Rebuses and Concrete Writing 37. Mnemonics 38. Designing a Memorial 39. Stepping Into a Painting 40. Japanese Internment During World War II 41. ASCII Code 42. Protest Songs 43. Inaugural Presidential Address 44. Portals to the World 45. Stories From Childhood 46. Round-Robin Stories 47. Writing Grab Bag 48. Using Census Data 49. Explore a Favorite Artist 50. What Makes a Good Life? 51. Creating an Ethical Will 52. Written in Stone 53. Photographic Timeline 54. 1900 55. Ninety-Five Theories 56. Analyzing the New England Primer (1692) 57. Slavery in the Constitution? 58. How Crowded Was the Middle Passage? 59. The List of Creepy Coincidences 60. Sacrifices 61. The Classroom Missile Crisis 62. Listening to Sources? 63. Personal Timelines: A Puzzle? 64. Movies as a Window Into History 65. Writing Their Own Script 66. Write Obituaries 67. Take a Trip to Mars 68. CIA Fact Book 69. Talking to an Expert 70. Famous Last Words 71. Columbus and Culture 72. Collage 73. Making Models 74. The World Without Human Life 75. Creating the Scene for a Story 76. How Long Is a Thousand Years? 77. Creating a Dadaist Poem 78. War Stories 79. Editorial Cartoons as Social Commentary 80. True or False 81. Creating Codes 82. What Is the Law? 83. When Is the Law the Law? 84. Symbols in Our Culture 85. Symbols on Our Money 86. What's on the Stamp? 87. Place Names 88. Art Museums of the World 89. America's Attic 90. Written in Stone 91. Photographic Community Timeline 92. The Sounds of Silence 93. What's in a Name? 94. More What's in a Name? 95. Crazy Inventions 96. Idioms 97. Famous Inventions and Their Impact on the World 98. What Is in Good Taste? 99. Creating a Self-Portrait 100. Found Art References.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781412940009 20160528
Active learning in secondary classrooms involves much more than students recording the "right" answers on high-stakes tests. In the social studies in particular, active learning promotes critical thinking, deep understanding, and transfer to real-life situations of knowledge about such important issues as social justice, culture, language, diversity, the arts, economics, and science and technology. Eugene F. Provenzo, Jr., Dan W. Butin, and Anthony Angelini have compiled 100 ready-to-use units that address critical social issues. All lessons emphasize comprehension, comparison, and transfer across disciplinary boundaries and include extension activities, a listing of resources, and suggestions for pacing and time management. Offering content aligned with curriculum standards established by the National Council for the Social Studies, the National Council of Teachers of English, and McREL's content knowledge standards, this resource includes a matrix linking each lesson to the relevant standards.Instructors and instructional leaders committed to social justice, multiple modes of inquiry, and constructivist learning will find this collection of experiential learning strategies to be an invaluable resource.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781412940009 20160528
Education Library (Cubberley)