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Book
xi 95 pages
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
xiv, 281 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), color maps ; 27 cm
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
449 pages ; 26 cn.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
iii, 53 pages : illustrations, maps ; 28 cm.
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • The Marias River Canyon geoecosystem. Geologic setting ; Geomorphology of the Marias River Canyon ; Climatic setting ; Flora and large vertebrate fauna ; Overview of regional prehistory ; Archaeological site context
  • Late Holocene depositional environments of the Marias River Canyon. Marias River depositional environment ; Alluvial-fan depositional environment ; Hillslope depositional environment
  • Archaeological materials and geologic context of the Goose Bill Site Complex (24CH887). Site description ; Archaeological materials and stratigraphic context
  • Archaeological and geological materials from the Sparrowhawk Site (24CH301). Site setting ; Archaeological materials and their context ; Stratigraphic context and age
  • Geoecology : plant communities and ungulate niches. Plant communities ; Use of plants by native Americans ; Relations between depositional units and plant communities ; Ungulate niches
  • Geoecological implications for archaeology
  • Conclusions.
The Marias River canyon in north-central Montana, incised into Upper Cretaceous strata of the Great Plains during latest Pleistocene to Holocene time, served as a locus of human activity tied to the unique floral and faunal resources it provided ancient peoples. Erosion of the main canyon walls resulted in deposition of tributary junction alluvial fans characterized by debris-flow and hyperconcentrated flow sediment transport processes where side canyons emerged onto the alluvial valley floor. These alluvial-fan deposits preserve Late Precontact archaeological remains accessible due to their postburial exposure where partially eroded by the meandering channel of the Marias River (Goose Bill site complex). Archaeological materials are also preserved high on the dissected canyon walls where movement of hillslope sediment and colluvium by sheetwash led to their burial (Sparrowhawk site). Deposition of sediment of contrasting physical attributes (grain size, sorting, clay mineral content) within the canyon influences soil substrate properties, favoring growth of specialized plant communities in both alluvial-fan and fluvial environments. These relations exemplify the strong geoecological connections among depositional environment and sediment characteristics, substrate properties, and vegetation community development. The plant communities, interacting in conjunction with the physical landscape, provided a range of habitats utilized by such large mammals as plains bison, Rocky Mountain elk, Audubon sheep, pronghorn, Rocky Mountain mule deer, and white-tailed deer. Four major bison bone layers, some including bison hair and other soft tissues, with associated stone arrow points and stone flakes (artifacts) and evidence of bone processing are preserved in alluvial-fan deposits exposed along the bank of the Marias River at the Goose Bill site complex. These relations illustrate: (1) human activities dating to ~100--595 yr B.P. (falling within the Late Precontact Period of regional archaeological prehistory) that reflect subsistence reliance on bison as a food source, (2) the importance of tributary alluvial fans proximal to canyon walls in preserving archaeological remains, and (3) the role of the meandering Marias River channel in destroying these deposits over a time period of <100 yr. Sediment deposition by overland flow higher up the canyon walls at the Sparrowhawk site preserves a somewhat older (710--830 yr B.P.) archaeological record suggestive of a broader spectrum of resource (food) processing spatially decoupled from an area of bison kill/death.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
312 pages ; 23 cm
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
xvii, 296 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • Part 1: Modeling the Relationships between Societies and Nature Introduction 1. The Theoretical Context of Classical Geography 2. Statistical and Probability Models for Given Relationships Between Societies and the Natural Environment 3. Models of Ordinary Dynamic Systems Part 2: Modeling Geographic Locations Introduction 4. Theories of Geographical Locations 5. Theoretical Geolocation Models Part 3: Spatial Structures and Territorial Dynamics Introduction 6. Theories Used to Understand Territorial Structures and Dynamics 7. Models of Basic Structures: Points and Fields 8. Models of Basic Structures: Networks 9. Geographical Space as a Mixture of Basic Spatial Structures 10. Morphogenetic Macro- and Micro-models.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781785482250 20170522
Geographical Models with Mathematica provides a fairly comprehensive overview of the types of models necessary for the development of new geographical knowledge, including stochastic models, models for data analysis, for geostatistics, for networks, for dynamic systems, for cellular automata and for multi-agent systems, all discussed in their theoretical context. The author then provides over 65 programs, written in the Mathematica language, that formalize these models. Case studies are provided to help the reader apply these programs to their own studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781785482250 20170522
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Map
1 online resource (1 map) : color + pamphlet (vi, 20 pages).
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
235 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), color maps ; 27 cm
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
ix, 307 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : color illustrations, map ; 25 cm
  • Introduction
  • Paved and hallowed. Manhattan
  • Mexico City
  • London
  • Northern Virginia
  • Gettysburg
  • Farmed and wild. Bishopstone
  • Soil
  • Ames
  • Grass
  • The sandhills
  • Hell and sacred. Appalachia
  • Treblinka
  • Alaska
  • The Sierra Nevada
  • Home.
"When a teaspoon of soil contains millions of species, and when we pave over the earth on a daily basis, what does that mean for our future? What is the risk to our food supply, the planet's wildlife, the soil on which every life-form depends? Who much undeveloped, untrodden ground do we even have left? Paul Bogard set out to answer these questions in The Ground Beneath Us, and what he discovered is astounding. From New York (where more than 118,000,000 tons of human development rest on top of Manhattan Island) to Mexico City (which sinks inches each year into the Aztec ruins beneath it), Bogard shows us the weight of our cities' footprints. And as we see hallowed ground coughing up bullets at a Civil War battlefield; long-hidden remains emerging from below the sites of concentration camps; the dangerous, alluring power of fracking; the fragility of the giant redwoods, our planet's oldest living things; the surprises hidden under a Major League ballpark's grass; and the sublime beauty of our few remaining wildest places, one truth becomes blazingly clear-- the ground is the easiest resource to forget, and the last we should. Bogard's The Ground Beneath Us is deeply transporting reading that introduces farmers, geologists, ecologists, cartographers, and others in a quest to understand the importance of something too many of us take for granted-- dirt. From growth and to death and loss, and from the subsurface technologies that run our cities to the dwindling number of idyllic Edens that remain, this is the fascinating story of the ground beneath our feet.-- Dust jacket.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
vi, 232 pages : maps (some color), illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
388 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
xxvi, 649 pages : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 29 cm.
The proper management of geographic data can provide assistance to a number of different sectors within society. As such, it is imperative to continue advancing research for spatial data analysis. The Handbook of Research on Geographic Information Systems Applications and Advancements presents a thorough overview of the latest developments in effective management techniques for collecting, processing, analyzing, and utilizing geographical data and information. Highlighting theoretical frameworks and relevant applications, this book is an ideal reference source for researchers, academics, professionals, and students actively involved in the field of geographic information systems.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781522509370 20170515
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
xvii, 304 pages : illustrations ; 29 cm.
  • Preface vii Notation xi Acknowledgments xvii Part I: Introduction 1 1 Introduction 3 Part II: Problem Definition 7 2 Initial Boundary Value Problem for Hydraulic Head 9 3 Hydraulic Head Components and Their IBVPs 13 4 Periodic Transient Components 15 5 BVP for Harmonic Constituents 21 6 Polar Form of Space BVP 29 7 Complex-Variable Form of Space BVP 37 8 Comparison of Space BVP Forms 43 Part III: Elementary Examples 45 9 Examples: 1D Flow in Ideal Media 47 10 Examples: 1D Flow in Exponential Media 63 11 Examples: 1D Flow in Power Law Media 89 12 Examples: 2D and 3D Flow in Ideal Media 95 13 Examples: Uniform-Gradient Flow 107 Part IV: Essential Concepts 121 14 Attenuation, Delay, and Gradient Collinearity 123 15 Time Variation of Specific-Discharge Constituent 131 Part V: Stationary Points 149 16 Stationary Points: Basic Concepts 151 17 Stationary Points: Amplitude and Phase 157 18 Flow Stagnation 171 Part VI: Wave Propagation 181 19 Harmonic, Hydraulic Head Waves 183 20 Wave Distortion 199 21 Waves in One Dimension 215 22 Wave Equation 225 Part VII: Energy Transport 231 23 Mechanical Energy of Groundwater 233 24 Mechanical Energy: Time Averages 239 25 Mechanical Energy of Single-Constituent Fields 249 Part VIII: Conclusion 261 26 Conclusion 263 Part IX: Appendices 269 A Hydraulic Head Components 271 B Useful Results from Trigonometry 273 C Linear Transformation of Space Coordinates 275 D Complex Variables 281 E Kelvin Functions 283 Bibliography 291 Index 295.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119133940 20170306
Hydrodynamics of Time-Periodic Groundwater Flow introduces the emerging topic of periodic fluctuations in groundwater. While classical hydrology has often focused on steady flow conditions, many systems display periodic behavior due to tidal, seasonal, annual, and human influences. Describing and quantifying subsurface hydraulic responses to these influences may be challenging to those who are unfamiliar with periodically forced groundwater systems. The goal of this volume is to present a clear and accessible mathematical introduction to the basic and advanced theory of time-periodic groundwater flow, which is essential for developing a comprehensive knowledge of groundwater hydraulics and groundwater hydrology. Volume highlights include: Overview of time-periodic forcing of groundwater systems Definition of the Boundary Value Problem for harmonic systems in space and time Examples of 1-, 2-, and 3-dimensional flow in various media Attenuation, delay, and gradients, stationary points and flow stagnation Wave propagation and energy transport Hydrodynamics of Time-Periodic Groundwater Flow presents numerous examples and exercises to reinforce the essential elements of the theoretical development, and thus is eminently well suited for self-directed study by undergraduate and graduate students. This volume will be a valuable resource for professionals in Earth and environmental sciences who develop groundwater models., including in the fields of groundwater hydrology, soil physics, hydrogeology, geoscience, geophysics, and geochemistry. Time-periodic phenomena are also encountered in fields other than groundwater flow, such as electronics, heat transport, and chemical diffusion. Thus, students and professionals in the field of chemistry, electronic engineering, and physics will also find this book useful..
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119133940 20170306
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
[vi], 274 pages : maps (some color), illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm.
  • Introduction to integrated environmental modelling to solve real world problems: methods, vision and challenges
  • Model fusion at the British Geological Survey: experiences and future trends
  • Integrated environmental modelling: achieving the vision
  • From integration to fusion: the challenges ahead
  • Splicing recharge and groundwater flow models in the Environment Agency National Groundwater Modelling System
  • 3D geological models to groundwater flow models: data integration between GSI3D and groundwater flow modelling software GMS and FeFlow®
  • The potential for the use of model fusion techniques in building and developing catastrophe models
  • A stochastic bioenergetics model-based approach to translating large river flow and temperature into fish population responses: the pallid sturgeon example
  • Hierarchical stochastic modelling of large river ecosystems and fish growth across spatio-temporal scales and climate models: the Missouri River endangered pallid sturgeon example
  • Geological map fusion: OneGeology-Europe and INSPIRE
  • Integrated Environmental Modelling: human decisions, human challenges
  • Socio-hydrology modelling for an uncertain future, with examples from the USA and Canada
  • Thinking platforms for smarter urban water systems: fusing technical and socio-economic models and tools
  • The use of data-mining techniques for developing effective decision support systems: a case study of simulating the effects of climate change on coastal salinity intrusion
  • Fusing and disaggregating models, data and analysis tools for a dynamic science-society interface
  • Future of technology in NERC data models and informatics: outputs from InformaTEC
  • The uncertainty cascade in model fusion.
The discipline of Integrated Environmental Modelling (IEM) has developed in order to solve complex environmental problems, for example understanding the impacts of climate change on the physical environment. IEM provides methods to fuse or link models together, this in turn requires facilities to make models discoverable and also to make the outputs of modelling easily visualized. The vision and challenges for IEM going forward are summarized by leading proponents. Several case studies describe the application of model fusion to a range of real-world problems including integrating groundwater and recharge models within the UK Environment Agency, and the development of 'catastrophe' models to predict better the impact of natural hazards. Communicating modelling results to end users who are often not specialist modellers is also an emerging area of research addressed within the volume. Also included are papers that highlight current developments of the technology platforms underpinning model fusion.-- Source other than Library of Congress.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
xxxvii, 401 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), maps (chiefly color) ; 24 cm.
  • List of Figures Series Foreword Preface Editors Contributors Introduction On Scale in Space, Time, and Space-Time Keith C. Clarke and Ian J. Irmischer Complexity and Geographic Scale Dolores Jane Forbes Scaling Geocomplexity and Remote Sensing Shaun Lovejoy Fusion of Multiscaled Spatial and Temporal Data: Techniques and Issues Bandana Kar and Edwin Chow Error and Accuracy Assessment for Fused Data: Remote Sensing and GIS Edwin Chow and Bandana Kar Remote Sensing Techniques for Forest Fire Disaster Management: The FireHub Operational Platform Charalampos Kontoes, Ioannis Papoutsis, Themistocles Herekakis, Emmanuela Ieronymidi, and Iphigenia Keramitsoglou Geomorphometry and Mountain Geodynamics: Issues of Scale and Complexity Michael P. Bishop and Iliyana D. Dobreva Downscaling on Demand: Examples in Forest Canopy Mapping Gordon M. Green, Sean C. Ahearn, and Wenge Ni-Meister Multiscale Analysis of Urban Areas Using Mixing Models Dar Roberts, Michael Alonzo, Erin B. Wetherley, Kenneth L. Dudley, and Phillip E. Dennison Urban Road Extraction from Combined Data Sets of High-Resolution Satellite Imagery and Lidar Data Using GEOBIA Minjuan Cheng and Qihao Weng Integrating Remotely Sensed Climate and Environmental Information into Public Health Pietro Ceccato, Stephen Connor, Tufa Dinku, Andrew Kruczkiewicz, , Jerrod Lessel, Alexandra Sweeney, and Madeleine C. Thomson Scale in Disease Transmission, Surveillance, and Modeling Guillaume Chabot-Couture Remote Sensing and Socioeconomic Data Integration: Lessons from the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center Alex de Sherbinin Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781482218268 20170515
Integrating Scale in Remote Sensing and GIS serves as the most comprehensive documentation of the scientific and methodological advances that have taken place in integrating scale and remote sensing data. This work addresses the invariants of scale, the ability to change scale, measures of the impact of scale, scale as a parameter in process models, and the implementation of multiscale approaches as methods and techniques for integrating multiple kinds of remote sensing data collected at varying spatial, temporal, and radiometric scales. Researchers, instructors, and students alike will benefit from a guide that has been pragmatically divided into four thematic groups: scale issues and multiple scaling; physical scale as applied to natural resources; urban scale; and human health/social scale. Teeming with insights that elucidate the significance of scale as a foundation for geographic analysis, this book is a vital resource to those seriously involved in the field of GIScience.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781482218268 20170515
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
viii, 168 pages : maps, many color illustrations ; 29 cm.
  • Part 1 - Subduction Zone Earthquake.- Achievement of the Project for Advanced GPS/Acoustic Survey in the Last Four Years.- Interplate-Coupling in and Around the Rupture Area of the 2011 Tohoku-Earthquake (M9.0) Before its Occurrence Based on Terrestrial and Sea-Floor-Geodetic Observations.- Part 2 - Geodetic Observations of the Earthquake Deformation Cycle.- Geodetic and Geomorphic Evaluations of Earthquake Generation Potential of the Northern Sumatran Fault, Indonesia.- Virtual Quake: Statistics, Co-Seismic Deformations and Gravity Changes for Driven Earthquake Fault-Systems.- Dynamic Strain in a South African Gold Mine by the 2011 Tohoku-Earthquake.- Twenty-Two Years of Combined GPS Products for Geophysical Applications and a Decade of Seismogeodesy.- Earthquake Risk on the San Andreas Fault System in Northern California.- Rheological Structure beneath the NE Japan Inferred from Coseismic Strain Anomalies Associated with the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (Mw9.0).- Paradoxical Vertical Crustal Movement Along the Pacific Coast of Northeast Japan.- Forecasting earthquakes with the Virtual Quake simulator: Regional and fault-partitioned catalogs.- Part 3 - Near Real-Time Warning.- Development and assessment of real-1 time fault model estimation routines in the GEONET real-time processing system.- Buoy Platform Development for Observation of Tsunami and Crustal deformation.- GPS/Acoustic Measurement Using a Multipurpose Moored Buoy System.- Part 4 - Interaction of Earthquakes and Volcanoes.- Pressure Sources of Miyakejima Volcano Estimated From Crustal Deformation.- Part 5 - Natural Hazards.- Application of A10 absolute gravimeter for monitoring land subsidence in Jakarta, Indonesia.- Introduction to the Gravity Database (GALILEO) Compiled by the Geological Survey of Japan.- GPS Tsunami Meter using Satellite Communication System with a Function which Measures Ocean Bottom Crustal Movements.- Ground Deformation in the Kyoto and Osaka Area During Recent 19.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319397672 20170206
These proceedings contain a selection of peer-reviewed papers presented at the International Symposium on Geodesy for Earthquake and Natural Hazards (GENAH), Matsushima, Japan, 22-26 July, 2014. The scientific sessions focused on monitoring temporal and spatial changes in Earth's lithosphere and atmosphere using geodetic satellite systems, high rate GNSS as well as high resolution imaging (InSAR, Lidar). Researchers in various fields of geodesy discussed the role of geodesy in disaster mitigation and how groups with different techniques can collaborate toward such a goal.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319397672 20170206
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
x, 310 pages, 12 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 24 cm
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
xiii, 297 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 29 cm.
  • Contributors vii Preface xi Part I Hemispherical Dependence of Magnetospheric Energy Injection and the Thermosphere-Ionosphere Response 1 1 Interhemispheric Asymmetries in Magnetospheric Energy Input 3 Eftyhia Zesta, Athanasios Boudouridis, James M Weygand, Endawoke Yizengaw, Mark B Moldwin, and Peter Chi 2 Simultaneity and Asymmetry in the Occurrence of Counterequatorial Electrojet along African Longitudes 21 A Babatunde Rabiu, Olanike O Folarin, Teiji Uozumi, and Akimasa Yoshikawa 3 Stormtime Equatorial Electrojet Ground-Induced Currents: Increasing Power Grid Space Weather Impacts at Equatorial Latitudes 33 Mark B Moldwin and Justin S Tsu 4 Differences in Midlatitude Ionospheric Response to Magnetic Disturbances at Northern and Southern Hemispheres and Anomalous Response During the Last Extreme Solar Minimum 41 Dalia Bure ova and Jan La tovic ka Part II Longitude Dependence of Storm-Enhanced Densities (SEDs) 59 5 Longitude and Hemispheric Dependencies in Storm-Enhanced Density 61 Roderick A Heelis 6 Solar Cycle 24 Observations of Storm-Enhanced Density and the Tongue of Ionization 71 Anthea J Coster, Philip J Erickson, John C Foster, Evan G Thomas, J Michael Ruohoniemi, and Joseph Baker 7 A Global Ionospheric Range Error Correction Model for Single-Frequency GNSS Users 85 Norbert Jakowski and Mohammed Mainul Hoque Part III Longitude Spatial Structure in Total Electron Content and Electrodynamics 93 8 Determining the Longitude Dependence of Vertical E x B Drift Velocities Associated with the Four-Cell, Nonmigrating Tidal Structure 95 David Anderson and Tzu-Wei Fang 9 Imaging the Global Vertical Density Structure from the Ground and Space 105 Endawoke Yizengaw and Brett A Carter 10 On the Longitudinal Dependence of the Equatorial Electrojet 115 Vafi Doumbia and Oswald Didier Franck Grodji 11 Tomographic Reconstruction of Ionospheric Electron Density Using Altitude-Dependent Regularization Strength over the Eastern Africa Longitude Sector 127 Gizaw Mengistu Tsidu, Gebreab Kidanu, and Gebregiorgis Abraha 12 Variation of the Total Electron Content with Solar Activity During the Ascending Phase of Solar Cycle 24 Observed at Makerere University, Kampala 145 Florence M D ujanga, Phillip Opio, and Francis Twinomugisha 13 Longitudinal Dependence of Day-to-Day Variability of Critical Frequency of Equatorial Type Sporadic E (foEsq) 155 Emmanuel O Somoye, Andrew O Akala, Aghogho Ogwala, Eugene O Onori, Rasaq A Adeniji-Adele, and Enerst E Iheonu Part IV Temporal Response to Lower Atmosphere Disturbances 163 14 Impact of Migrating Tides on Electrodynamics During the January 2009 Sudden Stratospheric Warming 165 Timothy J Fuller-Rowell, Tzu-Wei Fang, Houjun Wang, Vivien Matthias, Peter Hoffmann, Klemens Hocke, and Simone Studer 15 Simultaneous Measurements and Monthly Climatologies of Thermospheric Winds and Temperatures in the Peruvian and Brazilian Longitudinal Sectors 175 John W Meriwether, Jonathan J Makela, and Daniel J Fisher 16 Observations of TIDs over South and Central America 187 Cesar E Valladares, Robert Sheehan, and Edgardo E Pacheco 17 Modeling the East African Ionosphere 207 Melessew Nigussie, Baylie Damtie, Endawoke Yizengaw, and Sandro M Radicella Part V Response of the Thermosphere and Ionosphere to Variability in Solar Radiation 225 18 Ionospheric Response to X-Ray and EUV Flux Changes During Solar Flares: A Review 227 Ludger Scherliess 19 Spectrally Resolved X-Ray and Extreme Ultraviolet Irradiance Variations During Solar Flares 243 Thomas N Woods, Francis G Eparvier, and James P Mason Part VI Ionospheric Irregularities and Scintillation 255 20 Effect of Magnetic Declination on Equatorial Spread F Bubble Development 257 Joseph D Huba 21 Global Ionospheric Electron Density Disturbances During the Initial Phase of a Geomagnetic Storm on 5 April 2010 263 Chigomezyo M Ngwira and Anthea J Coster Index 281.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118929209 20170403
This monograph is the outcome of an American Geophysical Union Chapman Conference on longitude and hemispheric dependence of ionospheric space weather, including the impact of waves propagating from the lower atmosphere. The Chapman Conference was held in Africa as a means of focusing attention on an extensive geographic region where observations are critically needed to address some of the fundamental questions of the physical processes driving the ionosphere locally and globally. The compilation of papers from the conference describes the physics of this system and the mechanisms that control ionospheric space weather in a combination of tutorial-like and focused articles that will be of value to the upper atmosphere scientific community in general and to ongoing global magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere (MIT) modeling efforts in particular. A number of articles from each science theme describe details of the physics behind each phenomenon that help to solve the complexity of the MIT system. Because this volume is an outcome of the research presented at this first space science Chapman Conference held in Africa, it has further provided an opportunity for African scientists to communicate their research results with the international community. In addition, the meeting and this conference volume will greatly enhance the space science education and research interest in the African continent and around the world. Ionospheric Space Weather includes articles from six science themes that were discussed at the Chapman Conference in 2012. These include: * Hemispherical dependence of magnetospheric energy injection and the thermosphere-ionosphere response * Longitude and hemispheric dependence of storm-enhanced densities (SED) * Response of the thermosphere and ionosphere to variability in solar radiation * Longitude spatial structure in total electron content and electrodynamics * Temporal response to lower-atmosphere disturbances * Ionospheric irregularities and scintillation Ionospheric Space Weather: Longitude Dependence and Lower Atmosphere Forcing will be useful to both active researchers and advanced graduate students in the field of physics, geophysics, and engineering, especially those who are keen to acquire a global understanding of ionospheric phenomena, including observational information from all longitude sectors across the globe.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118929209 20170403
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)