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Book
xv, 263 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
140 pages : illustrations ; 30 cm.
"Zeitschrift für Kristallographie. Supplement, Volume 38, presents the complete abstracts of all contributions to the 26th Annual Conference of the German Crystallographic Society in Essen (Germany) 2018"-- Provided by publisher.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
vi, 486 pages : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 26 cm.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
xi, 224 pages : illustrations (some color), maps, charts ; 26 cm.
  • ForewordJurgen Runge 1 Obituaries - Karl W. Butzer (1934-2016), Francoise Gasse (1942-2014)Jurgen Runge and Florence Sylvestre 2 Exploration of the Tibesti Mountains - Re-appraisal after 50 Years?Baldur Gabriel 3 The geomorphology and river longitudinal profiles of the Congo-Kalahari WatershedTyrel J. Flugel, Frank D. Eckardt and Woody (Fenton) P.D. Cotterill 4 Palynological Evidence (Apectodinium) of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) Event in the Sediments of the Oshosun Formation, Eastern Dahomey Basin, Southwest NigeriaOlugbenga A. Boboye and Dupe Egbeola 5 Sedimentological, palynological and stable isotopes studies on quaternary to neogene sediments of the Eastern Dahomey Basin, Lagos, NigeriaOlugbenga A. Boboye and Dupe Egbeola 6 Palynofacies, sedimentology and palaeo-environment evidenced by studies on IDA-6 well, Niger delta, NigeriaJacinta N. Chukwuma-Orji, Edward A. Okosun, Isah A. Goro and Salome H. Waziri 7 Tropical Palaeovegetation dynamics, environmental and Climate change impact from the low latitude Coastal Offshore Margin, Niger Delta, Gulf of GuineaOnema Adojoh, Fabienne Marret, Robert Duller and Peter Osterloff 8 Palaeoenvironments and Palaeoclimates during the Upper-Pleistocene and Holocene in the western Lake Kivu regionChantal Kabonyi Nzabandora, Emile Roche and Mike I. Akaegbobi 9 The Coastal Holocene Sedimentary Environments of the Bays of Loango and Pointe-Noire, Congo: Previous Works, Recent Development and SynthesisDieudonne Malounguila-Nganga, Pierre Giresse, Timothee Miyouna and Florent Boudzoumou 10 Geochronology and technological development: The microscopic and metric evidence from Middle Stone Age (MSA) points at Mumba rock-shelter, northern TanzaniaPastory G. M. Bushozi, Luis Leque and Audax Mabulla 11 Spatial Distribution and Impacts of Mining Development Minerals in Greater Accra Metropolitan Area, GhanaRosemary Okla.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351666398 20180312
During the Neogene - covering the last 23 Million years - the evolution of the environmental setting in Africa was subject to considerable changes. Natural shifts, slow and rapid, evidenced by modifications in palaeogeography, geodynamics, climate, and vegetation have caused repeated and strong changes of ecosystems in the lower latitudes. Using a variety of proxy data - researched and applied by many authors from numerous disciplines - an attempt is made to reconstruct African landscapes over space and time. Besides such spatio-temporal oscillations in recently humid, semi-humid, and dry areas of Africa, this volume of Palaeoecology of Africa (PoA) focuses on long term interrelationships between ecosystem dynamics and climate change, not ignoring the ever growing and ongoing influence of humans on natural ecosystems since the Quaternary. Regionally, this volume lays a strong focus on Nigeria (Niger Delta). Facing the omnipresent challenges of Global Change, an increasing number of African scientists is involved in palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic research, both theoretical and applied. PoA systematically supports established as well as junior African scientists in the field of sustainable cooperation and academic capacity building. This book will be of interest to all concerned with or interested in up-to-date research on Neogene to Quaternary low latitudes ecosystem changes and their respective interpretation in the framework of natural climate and vegetation change evidenced by a variety of methods that allow to read and learn from the past by following the motto, "The geologic foretime as the key to the present, and possibly to the future." Palynologists, Geologists, Geographers, Archaeologists, and Geomorphologists will find this edition equally useful for their work.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351666398 20180312
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
xxii, 183 pages : illustrations ; 18 cm.
  • Origins
  • Earth system
  • Geologic time
  • The great acceleration
  • Anthropos
  • Oikos
  • Politikos
  • Prometheus.
Climate scientists, geologists, ecologists, and archaeologists recognize the profound effects of human activity on Earth, though whether and how this should be recognized as a formal geological epoch - the Anthropocene - remains under debate, Erle Ellis describes how the Anthropocene concept is affecting the sciences, humanities, and politics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198792987 20180625
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
xxvi, 354 pages : illustrations, maps / ; 28 cm
A variety of exercises provide flexibility in lab assignments. Each exercise includes key terms and learning concepts linked to Geosystems. The 10th Edition includes more integrated media, including Quick Response (QR) codes linking to Pre-Lab videos. Supported media resources needed for exercises including KMZ files for all of the Google Earth (TM) exercises found in the lab manual.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780134686363 20180213
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
xxii, 215 pages : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: II. Asteroid impacts in time and space III. Criteria for identification of asteroid impact events IV. Asteroid impacts in time IV.1 Archean asteroid impacts IV.1.1 ~3.46-3.47 Ga bombardment IV.1.1.1 Miralga Creek impacts (~3.47 Ga) IV.1.1.2 Marble Bar impacts (~3.46 Ga) IV.1.2 ~3.22-3.25 Ga bombardment IV.1.2.1 Sulphur Springs unconformities and olistostrome (~3.22 Ga) IV.1.3 ~2.63-2.48 Ga bombardment IV.1.2.2 Jeerinah Impact layer and Carawine tsunami breccia (~2.63 Ga) IV.1.2.3 Paraburdoo spherule layer (~2.57 Ga) IV.1.2.4 Spherule Marker Bed (~2.56 Ga) IV.1.2.5 Dales Gorge Spherule layer (~2.48 Ga) IV.2 Proterozoic asteroid impacts IV.3 Phanerozoic asteroid impacts V. Australian Asteroid impacts V.1 Exposed impact structures >10 km in diameter V.1.1 Acraman (~40-90 km) V.1.2 Yarrabubba (~30-70 km) V.1.3 Shoemaker (~29-31 km) V.1.4 Lawn Hill (~18 km) V.1.5 Strangways (~25-40 km) V.1.6 Amelia Creek (~20x12 km) V.1.7 Cleanskin (~15 km) V.1.8 Glikson (~14 km) V.1.9 Gosses Bluff (~12 km) V.1.10 Kelly West (~8-20 km) V.1.11 Spider (~11-13 km) V.1.12 Goyder (~9-12 km) V.1.13 Impact structures <10 km in diameter V.2 Buried asteroid impacts V.2.1 Warburton East (~200 km) V.2.2 Warburton West (~200 km) V.2.3 Woodleigh (~120 km) V.2.4 Talundilly (84 km) V.2.4 Gnargoo (~75 km) V.2.5 Tookoonooka (~55 km) V.2.6 Mount Ashmore (>50 km) V.2.7 Coompana (~44 km) V.2.6 Yallalie (~12 km) V.2.7 Lake Raeside (~11 km) V.3 Meteorite impact craters V.3.1 Goat Paddock (~6 km) V.3.2 Liverpool (~1.6 km) V.3.3 Darwin (~1.2 km V.3.4 Wolfe Creek (~0.88 km)) V.3.5 Hickman (0.36 km) V.3.6 Boxhole (0.17 km) V.3.7 Henbury craters V.3.8 Other impact craters V.4 Magnetic and gravity signatures of buried asteroid impact structures VI. Asteroid impacts and ore genesis VI.1 A global perspective VI.2 Australian impact structures associated with mineralization VII. Asteroids and crustal evolution.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319745442 20180702
This book presents a comprehensive overview of Australian impact structures and related mineralization, including a discussion of the significance of many of these structures for crustal evolution. The book focuses in particular on Archaean impact ejecta/fallout units in the Pilbara Craton of Western Australia, large exposed and buried impact structures, and on the geophysical evidence for possible to probable impact structures. Thanks to their long-term geological stability, Precambrian and younger terrains in the Australian continent contain 38 confirmed impact structures and 43 ring and dome structures, many of which constitute possible to probable asteroid impact structures. The impact structures have been the subject of more than half a century of studies and range from several tens of meter-large craters to buried structures larger than 100 km in diameter. Discoveries of impact fallout units in the Pilbara Craton have defined the Pilbara as one of the two best documented terrains where Archaean impact ejecta/fallout deposits are identified, the other terrain being the Kaapvaal Craton in southern Africa. A synthesis of evidence from both cratons indicates periods of large asteroid bombardments during ~3.47 - 2.48 billion years-ago, including peak bombardment about 3.25-3.22 billion years-ago. The latter period coincides with an abrupt transformation of an early Archaean granite-greenstone crust to mid to late Archaean semi-continental crustal regimes, underpinning the significance of heavy asteroid impact events for crustal evolution. Apart from proven impact structures, Australian terrains display a range of circular features, including morphological and drainage rings, circular lakes, volcanic craters, tectonic domes, oval granite bodies, mafic igneous plugs, salt diapirs, and magnetic, gravity and seismic anomalies, many of which are of a likely impact origin. Thermal and hydrothermal processes associated with impact cratering bear important consequences for the formation of mineral deposits, such as Ni at Sudbury, Pb-Zn at Siljan and Kentland. Impact structures may also provide sites for the accumulation of hydrocarbons, whereas in some instances fracturing associated with impact structures allows outward migration of oil and gas.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319745442 20180702
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Map
1 atlas (14 pages) : 7 maps ; 28 x 43 cm
  • Map 1. Nightlife on the Farm : The Freshman Experience / Matthew Colin
  • Map 2. Stanford University Places I've Cried / Lilith Frakes
  • Map 3. Stanford Eateries : An Over the Counter:Map / Carla Ho
  • Map 4. Residential and Dining Enterprises : Welcome Home! / Kevin Ji
  • Map 5. Parks for People, Scenery, and Stanford / Alex Li
  • Map 6. Trees, Bikes, and Crime : The "Neighborhoods" of Stanford / Juliette Love
  • Map 7. Morning Glimpses / Dione Sheehan
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
ix, 196 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color), maps ; 29 cm.
  • Part I: Bioenergy and Land Use Change 1 Bioenergy and Land Use Change: An OverviewPankaj Lal, Aditi Ranjan, Bernabas Wolde, Pralhad Burli, Renata Blumberg 2 An Exploration of Agricultural Land Use Change at the Intensive and Extensive Margins: Implications for Biofuels Induced Land Use Change ModelingFarzad Taheripour, Hao Cui, Wallace E. Tyner 3 Effects of Sugarcane Ethanol Expansion in The Brazilian Cerrado: Land Use Response in the New FrontierMarcellus M. Caldas, Gabriel Granco, Christopher Bishop, Jude Kastens, J. Brown 4 Biofuel Expansion and the Spatial Economy: Implications for the Amazon Basin in the 21st CenturyEugenio Y. Arima, Peter Richards, Robert T. Walker Part II: Impacts on Natural Capital and Ecosystem Services 5 Towards Life Cycle Analysis on Land Use Change and Climate Impacts from Bioenergy Production: A ReviewZhangcai Qin, Christina E Canter, Hao Cai 6 Bio-energies Impact on Natural Capital and Ecosystem Services Compared to Other Energy TechnologiesAstley Hastings 7 Empirical Evidence of Soil Carbon Changes in Bioenergy Cropping SystemsMarty Schmer, Kathleen Stewart, Virginia Jin 8 Role of crop residues in maintaining soil organic carbon in agroecosystemsDavid E. Clay, Umakant Mishra 9 Incorporating Conservation Practices into the Future Bioenergy Landscape: Water Quality and HydrologyMay Wu, Mi-Ae Ha Part III: Data, Modeling and Uncertainties 10 Uncertainty in Estimates of Bioenergy-induced Land-use Change: The Impact of Inconsistent Land-cover DatasetsNagendra Singh, Keith Kline, Rebecca Efroymson, Budhendra Bhaduri, Bridget O Banion 11 Challenges in Quantifying and Regulating Indirect Emissions of BiofuelsDeepak Rajagopal 12 Biofuels, Land Use Change, and the Limits of Life Cycle AnalysisRichard. J. Plevin 13 Lost Momentum of Biofuels: What Went Wrong?Govinda Timilsina.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119297345 20180213
Although bioenergy is a renewable energy source, it is not without impact on the environment. Both the cultivation of crops specifically for use as biofuels and the use of agricultural byproducts to generate energy changes the landscape, affects ecosystems, and impacts the climate. Bioenergy and Land Use Change focuses on regional and global assessments of land use change related to bioenergy and the environmental impacts. This interdisciplinary volume provides both high level reviews and in-depth analyses on specific topics. Volume highlights include: Land use change concepts, economics, and modeling Relationships between bioenergy and land use change Impacts on soil carbon, soil health, water quality, and the hydrologic cycle Impacts on natural capital and ecosystem services Effects of bioenergy on direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions Biogeochemical and biogeophysical climate regulation Uncertainties and challenges associated with land use change quantification and environmental impact assessments Bioenergy and Land Use Change is a valuable resource for professionals, researchers, and graduate students from a wide variety of fields including energy, economics, ecology, geography, agricultural science, geoscience, and environmental science. Read an interview with the editors to find out more: https://eos.org/editors-vox/bioenergys-impacts-on-the-landscape.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119297345 20180213
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Map
1 map : color ; 67 x 100 cm, folded to 23 x 11 cm.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
xxiv, 213 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Preface 1. Climate Change and International Relations: Empirical and Theoretical Assessment 1.1 Introduction 1.2 The Aggravation of the Climate Crisis: Temperature Rise, Extreme Weather Events, Renewable Revolution and, the Emerging of the Geoengineering Option 1.3 The Paris Accord and the Rise of Climate Powers 1.4 The Climate Commitment Approach (CCA) 1.5 The Drivers of Climate Commitment 1.6 Final Considerations 2. Brazil in the International System: Underachieving (Environmental) Power and the Leadership Myth 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Brazil in the Global Carbon Cycle and the Planetary Boundaries 2.3 Brazil in the International System: Economy, Democracy, and Foreign Policy 2.4 Final Considerations 3. The Beginning: Brazil, the Climate Villain 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Emission Profile 1: Giant Irrational Deforestation 3.3 Domestic Climate Policy Profile 1: The Lack of Actions 3.4 Foreign Climate Policy Profile 1: A World Divided by Income: The Brazilian Contribution to the Climate Convention? (1992-2005) 3.5 Final Considerations: Low Climate Commitment, Amazon Disorders, and Strong Conservative Forces 4. The Rising: Brazil, the Developing Climate Leader? 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Emission Profile 2: Deforestation Control and Drastic Declining 4.3 Domestic Climate Policy Profile 2: Rapid and Intense Change 4.4 Foreign Climate Policy Profile 2: The Transition to Moderation and Activism 4.5 The Forces Behind Brazilian Climate Activism 4.6 Final Considerations: Medium Climate Commitment, Overcoming the Amazon Disorders, and the Rise of Reformist Forces 5. The Decline: Brazil, the Climate Negligent 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Emission Profile 3: The Return of High Emissions 5.3 Domestic Climate Policy Profile 3: Stagnation and Retraction 5.4 Foreign Climate Policy Profile 3: The Conservative Set-Back 5.5 The Drivers of the Decline 5.6 The Temer's Administration: New Economic Policy, Old Conservative Persistence 5.7 Final Considerations: Low Climate Commitment, Amazon Neglect, and the Rise of Conservative Forces 6. The Future: Brazil and the Bases for a True Environmental/Climate Leadership 6.1 Summarizing the Three Periods 6.2 The Future of Climate Commitment in Brazil: Dealing with the Amazon Neglect 6.3 The Drivers of Climate Commitment in the Coming Years 6.4 The Bases for a True Brazilian Climate Leadership: Democracy, Economy, and International Insertion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138106253 20180115
  • Preface 1. Climate Change and International Relations: Empirical and Theoretical Assessment 2. Brazil in the International System: Underachieving (Environmental) Power and the Leadership Myth 3. The Beginning: Brazil, the Climate Villain 4. The Rising: Brazil, the Developing Climate Leader? 5. The Decline: Brazil, the Climate Negligent 6. The Future: Brazil and the Bases for a True Environmental/Climate Leadership.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138106246 20180115
Climate change is increasingly a part of the human experience. As the problem worsens, the cooperative dilemma that the issue carries has become evident: climate change is a complex problem that systematically gets insufficient answers from the international system. This book offers an assessment of Brazil's role in the global political economy of climate change. The authors, Eduardo Viola and Matias Franchini expertly review and answer the most common and widely cited questions on whether and in which way Brazil is aggravating or mitigating the climate crisis, including:ã Is it the benign, cooperative, environmental power that the Brazilian government claims it is? Why was it possible to dramatically reduce deforestation in the Amazon (2005-2010) and, more recently, was there a partial reversion?ã The book provides an accessible-and much needed-introduction to all those studying the challenges of the international system in the Anthropocene. Through a thorough analysis of Brazil in perspective vis a vis other emerging countries, this book provides an engaging introduction and up to date assessment of the climate reality of Brazil and a framework to analyze the climate performance of major economies, both on emission trajectory and policy profile: the climate commitment approach. Brazil and Climate Change is essential reading for all students of Environmental Studies, Latin American Studies, International Relations and Comparative Politics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138106253 20180115
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Map
1 map : both sides, color, plastic-treated ; 125 x 69 cm, on sheet 92 x 61 cm, folded to 23 x 11 cm
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Map
1 map : both sides, color ; 88 x 150 cm, on sheet 90 x 110 cm, folded to 23 x 11 cm
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
vi, 475 pages : maps (some color), illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
xix, 317 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Trends in Temperature for the Himalayan Environment of Leh (Jammu and Kashmir), India, by Rohitashw Kumar.- 2. Changes in Sunshine Duration in Humid Environments of Agartala (Tripura), India, by D. Jhajharia.- 3. Application of Multiple Linear Regression as Downscaling Methodology for Lower Godavari Basin, by Gayam Akshara.- 4. Statistical Downscaling of Minimum Temperature of Raipur (C.G.) India, by R.K. Jaiswal.- 5. Statistical Downscaling of Daily Temperature and Precipitation Data from Coupled Model Inter-Comparison Project 5 (CMIP5)-RCPs Experiment: In Weyib River Basin, Southeastern Ethiopia, by Abdulkerim Bedewi Serur.- 6. Global Climate Pattern Behind Hydrological Extremes in Central India, by Kironmala Chanda.- 7. Changes in ENSO and IOD Effects on the Extreme Rainfall of Hyderabad City, India, by V. Agilan.- 8. Detecting Changes in Regional Rainfall Series in India using Binary Segmentation based Multiple Change-pointDetection Techniques, by Shagufta Akbari.- 9. Analyzing Non-stationarity in the Hyderabad City Rainfall Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves, by V. Agilan.- 10. Development of Finer Resolution Rainfall Scenario for Kangsabati Catchment and Command, by P. M. Dhage.- 11. Investigation of the Relationship Between Natural Aerosols and Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall Using a Climate Model, by Charu Singh.- 12. Change Point Analysis of Air Temperature in India, by Chithra N R. 13. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Sewage Treatment Plants Based on Sequential Batch Reactor in Maharashtra, by Vipin Singh.- 14. Study of Climate Change in Uttarakhand Himalayas: Changing Patterns of Historical Rainfall, by Archana Sarkar.- 15. The Impact of Climate Change on Rainfall Variability: A Study in Central Himalayas, by L. N. Thakural.- 16. Estimation of Changes in Annual Peak Flows in Netravathi River Basin, Karnataka, India by Fasnamol T M.- 17. Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Water Resources in Semi-Arid Region of Chittorgarh, India, by Ajit Pratap Singh.- 18. Water Availability under Changing Climate Scenario in Ur River Basin, by Thomas T..- 19. Water Sustainability Assessment Under Climatic Uncertainty- A Case Study of Chhattisgarh (India), by Surendra Kumar Chandniha.- 20. Coupling of Tennant concept with Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) for the prediction of environmental flow condition from rainfall in Upper Narmada basin, by Kumar Amrit.- 21. Assessment of Drought in Balangir District of Odisha, India Using Drought Indices, by A. Sudarsan Rao.- 22. Impact Of Hfc Fire Extinguishing Clean Agents On Climate Change And Its System Design Requirements For Fire Hazards In India- A Brief Study.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811057137 20180122
This book comprises the select proceedings of the International Conference on Water, Environment, Energy and Society. The book is divided into four parts. Part I deals with some aspects of climatic characteristics ranging from changes in temperature and sunshine hours to downscaling to global climate patterns and effects of El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) on extreme rainfall. Part II covers rainfall analysis, including changes in regional rainfall series, analysis of non-stationarity, summer monsoon and rainfall scenarios. Impacts of climate change are treated in Part III. Change point analysis, greenhouse gas emissions, rainfall variability, water resources variability, and water resources sustainability are discussed in this part. The concluding Part IV is on low flow and drought. It deals with the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) concept and assessment of drought. This book is of interest to researchers and practitioners in the field of water resources, hydrology, environmental resources, agricultural engineering, watershed management, and earth sciences, as well as those engaged in natural resources planning and management. Graduate students and those wishing to conduct further research in water and environment and their development and management find the book to be of value.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811057137 20180122
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
xviii, 630 pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Chapter 1: Introduction.- Chapter 2: A Short History of the Evolution of the Climate Smart Agriculture Approach and its Links to Climate Change and Sustainable Agriculture Debates.- Chapter 3:Economics of Climate-Smart Agriculture.- Chapter 4: Innovation in Response to Climate Change.- Chapter 5: Use of Satellite Information on Wetness and Temperature for Decision of Crop Yield Prediction, River Discharge and Planning.- Chapter 6: Early Warning Techniques for Local Climate Resilience: Smallholder Rice in Lao PDE.- Chapter 7 : Farmers' Perceptions of and Adaptations to Climate Change in Southeast Asia: The Case Study from Thailand and Vietnam.- Chapter 8: U.S. Maize Yield Growth and Countervailing Climate Change Impacts.- Chapter 9: Understanding Tradeoffs in the Context of Farm-Scale Impacts: An Application of Decision-Support Tools for Assessing Climate Smart Argiculture.- Chapter 10: Can Insurance Help Manage Climate Risk and Food Insecurity?: Evidence from the Pastoral Regions of East Africa.- Chapter 11: Can Cash Transfer Programs Promote Household Resilience?: Cross-Country Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa.- Chapter 12: Input Subsidy Programs and Climate Smart Agriculture.- Chapter 13: Robust Decision Making for a Climate-Resilient Development of the Agricultural Sector in Nigeria.- Chapter 14: Using AgMIP Regional Integrated Assessment Methods to Evaluate Vulnerability, Resilience and Adaptive Capacity for Climate Smart Agricultural Systems.- Chapter 15: Climate Smart Food Supply Chains in Developing Countries in an Era of Rapid Dual Change in Agrifood Systems and the Climate.- Chapter 16: The Adoption of Climate Smart Agriculture: The Role of Information and Insurance under Climate Change.- Chapter 17: A Qualitative Evaluation of CSA Options in Mixed Crop-Livestock Systems in Developing Countries.- Chapter 18: Identifying Strategies to Enhance the Resilience of Smallholder Farming Systems: Evidence of Zambia.- Chapter 19: Climate Risk Management Through Sustainable Land and Water Management in Sub-Saharan Africa.- Chapter 20: Improving the Resilience of Central Asian Agriculture to Weather Viability and Climate Change.- Chapter 21: Managing Environmental Risk in the Presence of Climate Change: The Role of Adaption in the Mile Basin of Ethiopia.- Chapter 22: Diversification as Part of a CSA Strategy: The Cases of Zambia and Malawi.- Chapter 23: Economic Analysis of Improved Smallholder Paddy and Maize Production in Northern Vietnam and Implications for Climate-Smart Agriculture.- Chapter 24: Synthesis: Devising Effective Strategies and Policies for CSA.- Chapter 25: Conclusions and Policy Implications.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319611938 20180416
This book is open access under a CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO license. The book uses an economic lens to identify the main features of climate-smart agriculture (CSA), its likely impact, and the challenges associated with its implementation. Drawing upon theory and concepts from agricultural development, institutional, and resource economics, this book expands and formalizes the conceptual foundations of CSA. Focusing on the adaptation/resilience dimension of CSA, the text embraces a mixture of conceptual analyses, including theory, empirical and policy analysis, and case studies, to look at adaptation and resilience through three possible avenues: ex-ante reduction of vulnerability, increasing adaptive capacity, and ex-post risk coping. The book is divided into three sections. The first section provides conceptual framing, giving an overview of the CSA concept and grounding it in core economic principles. The second section is devoted to a set of case studies illustrating the economic basis of CSA in terms of reducing vulnerability, increasing adaptive capacity and ex-post risk coping. The final section addresses policy issues related to climate change. Providing information on this new and important field in an approachable way, this book helps make sense of CSA and fills intellectual and policy gaps by defining the concept and placing it within an economic decision-making framework. This book will be of interest to agricultural, environmental, and natural resource economists, development economists, and scholars of development studies, climate change, and agriculture. It will also appeal to policy-makers, development practitioners, and members of governmental and non-governmental organizations interested in agriculture, food security and climate change.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319611938 20180416
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Map
1 atlas (72 pages) : illustrations (some color), color maps ; 28 cm
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)