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Book
163 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
David Rumsey Map Center, Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
240 pages : illustrations (colour), maps (black and white) ; 24 cm
David Rumsey Map Center
Book
288 pages : portrait, maps (some color) ; 25 cm
  • Foreward
  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1. Years of change and development (1768-1793)
  • Chapter 2. The impact of revolution (1793-1800)
  • Chapter 3. Esteemed pastor adn coadjutor Archbishop (1800-1812)
  • Chapter 4. Educational concerns and initiatives
  • Chapter 5. A decisive decade (1813-1823): Part I. Moving towards emancipation; Part II. Emerging divisions
  • Chapter 6. Early years as Archbishop of Dublin (1823-1826)
  • Chapter 7. The years to Catholic emancipation (1827-1830)
  • Chapter 8. The arrival of national education (1830-1832)
  • Chapter 9. Illness, hospitality, pastoral care and defense of the faith (1832-1840)
  • Chapter 10. Rejection by the RDS (1835) and conflict over national education (1838-1841)
  • Chapter 11. Repeal and bequests act (1842-1845)
  • Chapter 12. Years of famine and turmoil (1846-1850)
  • Chapter 13. University education for Catholics (1845-1852)
  • Chapter 14. The final years (1851-1852)
Daniel Murray was undoubtedly the outstanding Irish Catholic archbishop of the nineteenth century. He was a man of elegance and charm, ready to listen to others and to find good in them. To the redoubtable Bishop Doyle of Kildare and Leighlin, the archbishop was `an angel of a man'.His concern for the education of the poor led to the founding of the Irish Sisters of Charity and the invitation to Dublin of the Sisters of Mercy and the Irish Christian Brothers. His interest in the education of the middle class was manifested in the foundation of the Sisters of Loreto and in his support for the schools of the Jesuits and the Vincentians. A man of great pastoral energy, he built numerous churches and readily encouraged lay involvement in the work of the diocese. He was actively involved in assisting the Holy See in the appointment of priests and bishops around the world and his efforts to provide aid to the needy during the Great Famine, and the veneration and respect he inspired in his clergy, further contributed to the high esteem in which he was held. And yet, he is a virtually forgotten figure in Irish history.This neglect is related to the stance he took on some issues of the day - his support for certain government initiatives, his opposition to his clergy's involvement in politics, and his caution about openly supporting Repeal.
David Rumsey Map Center
Book
2 volumes : illustrations (chiefly color), color maps ; 28 cm
  • 1. Text and Images
  • 2. Tables and Indexes
"The Atlas of Ancient Rome provides a comprehensive archaeological survey of the city of Rome from prehistory to the early medieval period. Lavishly illustrated throughout with full-color maps, drawings, photos, and 3D reconstructions, this magnificent two-volume slipcased edition features the latest discoveries and scholarship, with new descriptions of more than 500 monuments, including the Sanctuary of Vesta, the domus Augusti, and the Mausoleum of Augustus. It is destined to become the standard reference for scholars, students, and anyone interested in the history of the city of Rome. The Atlas of Ancient Rome is monumental in scope. It examines the city's topography and political-administrative divisions, trade and economic production, and social landscape and infrastructure—from residential neighborhoods and gardens to walls, roads, aqueducts, and sewers. It describes the fourteen regions of Rome and the urban history of each in unprecedented detail, and includes profiles and reconstructions of major monuments and works of art. This is the only atlas of the ancient city to incorporate the most current archaeological findings and use the latest mapping technologies." -- Publisher's website
David Rumsey Map Center
Book
1 volume.
David Rumsey Map Center
Map
1 map ; 58 x 88 cm.
David Rumsey Map Center
Map
1 map ; 58 x 87 cm.
David Rumsey Map Center
Map
1 map.
David Rumsey Map Center
Book
xx, 331 pages, 16 pages of plates : illustrations, maps (some color) ; 26 cm.
  • Part I. On the tide of the Enlightenment
  • Part II. The antecedents and genesis of the General Survey
  • Part III. Mapping 'infant colonies' : the commencement of the General Survey
  • Part IV. 'Closing the net' : the General Survey during the administration of the Earl of Hillsborough
  • Part V. 'A new spring to our future endeavors' : the General Survery under the administration of the Earl of Dartmouth
  • Part VI. The General Survey and the militarisation of civilian cartography
  • Part VII. Conclusion and legacy.
The First Mapping of America tells the story of the General Survey. At the heart of the story lie the remarkable maps and the men who made them - the commanding and highly professional Samuel Holland, Surveyor-General in the North, and the brilliant but mercurial William Gerard De Brahm, Surveyor-General in the South. Battling both physical and political obstacles, Holland and De Brahm sought to establish their place in the firmament of the British hierarchy. Yet the reality in which they had to operate was largely controlled from afar, by Crown administrators in London and the colonies and by wealthy speculators, whose approval or opposition could make or break the best laid plans as they sought to use the Survey for their own ends.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781780764429 20171106
David Rumsey Map Center, Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
1 volume.
David Rumsey Map Center
Map
1 map ; 58 x 88 cm.
David Rumsey Map Center
Map
1 map ; 56 x 86 cm.
David Rumsey Map Center
Book
183 pages : illustrations (some color), facsimilies (some color), genealogical table, portraits (1 color) ; 30 cm
David Rumsey Map Center

14. LighteningMaps.org [2017]

Book
1 volume.
David Rumsey Map Center
Book
"volumes"
David Rumsey Map Center

16. Map of Fillory [2017]

Map
1 map.
David Rumsey Map Center
Map
1 map ; 56 x 87 cm.
David Rumsey Map Center
Book
xiv, 464 pages : maps ; 25 cm
  • A vision for American empire
  • Commanding space after the Seven Years' War
  • Securing the maritime Northeast
  • Marking the Indian boundary
  • Charting contested Caribbean space
  • Defining East Florida
  • Atlases of empire.
After the Treaty of Paris ended the Seven Years' War in 1763, British America stretched from Hudson Bay to the Florida Keys, from the Atlantic coast to the Mississippi River, and across new islands in the West Indies. To better rule these vast dominions, Britain set out to map its new territories with unprecedented rigor and precision. Max Edelson's The New Map of Empire pictures the contested geography of the British Atlantic world and offers new explanations of the causes and consequences of Britain's imperial ambitions in the generation before the American Revolution.Under orders from King George III to reform the colonies, the Board of Trade dispatched surveyors to map far-flung frontiers, chart coastlines in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, sound Florida's rivers, parcel tropical islands into plantation tracts, and mark boundaries with indigenous nations across the continental interior. Scaled to military standards of resolution, the maps they produced sought to capture the essential attributes of colonial spaces--their natural capacities for agriculture, navigation, and commerce--and give British officials the knowledge they needed to take command over colonization from across the Atlantic.Britain's vision of imperial control threatened to displace colonists as meaningful agents of empire and diminished what they viewed as their greatest historical accomplishment: settling the New World. As London's mapmakers published these images of order in breathtaking American atlases, Continental and British forces were already engaged in a violent contest over who would control the real spaces they represented.Accompanying Edelson's innovative spatial history of British America are online visualizations of more than 250 original maps, plans, and charts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674972117 20170508
Green Library, David Rumsey Map Center, Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Map
1 map.
David Rumsey Map Center
Book
xiii, 234 pages : color illustrations, maps (some color) ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: Why this book is a detective story
  • War and peace : the background of the story... from Napoleon's march on Moscow to the collapse of the Soviet Union
  • Capturing the world... on paper : describing the style, content, and symbology of the Red Army's maps of the world
  • Plots and plans : the overt and covert methods of the Soviet cartographers
  • Resurrection : the discovery of the maps after the fall of the Soviet Union and their continuing significance today
  • Appendix 1: Examples of maps of various series and scales
  • Appendix 2: References and resources
  • Appendix 3: Translation of typical city plan "Spravka"
  • Appendix 4: Translation of typical topographic map "Spravka"
  • Appendix 5: Symbols and annotation
  • Appendix 6: Glossary of common terms and abbreviations
  • Appendix 7: Print codes
  • Appendix 8: Secrecy and control.
Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, its legacy and the accompanying Russian-American tension continues to loom large. Russia's access to detailed information on the United States and its allies may not seem so shocking in this day of data clouds and leaks, but long before we had satellite imagery of any neighborhood at a finger's reach, the amount the Soviet government knew about your family's city, street, and even your home would astonish you. Revealing how this was possible, The Red Atlas is the never-before-told story of the most comprehensive mapping endeavor in history and the surprising maps that resulted. From 1950 to 1990, the Soviet Army conducted a global topographic mapping program, creating large-scale maps for much of the world that included a diversity of detail that would have supported a full range of military planning. For big cities like New York, DC, and London to towns like Pontiac, MI and Galveston, TX, the Soviets gathered enough information to create street-level maps. What they chose to include on these maps can seem obvious like locations of factories and ports, or more surprising, such as building heights, road widths, and bridge capacities. Some of the detail suggests early satellite technology, while other specifics, like detailed depictions of depths and channels around rivers and harbors, could only have been gained by actual Soviet feet on the ground. The Red Atlas includes over 350 extracts from these incredible Cold War maps, exploring their provenance and cartographic techniques as well as what they can tell us about their makers and the Soviet initiatives that were going on all around us. A fantastic historical document of an era that sometimes seems less distant, The Red Atlas offers an uncanny view of the world through the eyes of Soviet strategists and spies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226389578 20171227
David Rumsey Map Center, Earth Sciences Library (Branner)