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Journal/Periodical
v. ; 28 cm.
Business Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
iv, 106 pages ; 16 cm
  • Get specific
  • Seize the moment to act on your goals
  • Know exactly how far you have left to go
  • Be a realistic optimist
  • Focus on getting better, rather than being good
  • Have grit
  • Build your willpower muscle
  • Don't tempt fate
  • Focus on what you will do, not what you won't do.
Are you at the top of your game--or still trying to get there? Take your cues from the short, powerful 9 Things Successful People Do Differently, where the strategies and goals of the world's most successful people are on display--backed by research that shows exactly what has the biggest impact on performance. Here's a hint: accomplished people reach their goals because of what they do, not just who they are. Readers have called this "a gem of a book." Get ready to accomplish your goals at last.-- Provided by publisher.
Business Library
Book
viii, 140 pages : illustrations ; 18 cm.
  • Discovering your authentic leadership : why self-awareness is so critical / by Bill George, Peter Sims, Andrew N. McLean, and Diana Mayer
  • The authenticity paradox : to grow, you need to feel like a fake / by Herminia Ibarra
  • What bosses gain by being vulnerable : the psychology of human connection / by Emma Seppala
  • Practice tough empathy : when you care, you show your true self / by Rob Goffee and Gareth Jones
  • Cracking the code that stalls people of color : sacrificing identity to conform / by Sylvia Ann Hewlett
  • For a corporate apology to work, the CEO should look sad : make your emotions match your message / by Sarah Green Carmichael
  • Are leaders getting too emotional? : tears are OK if they're rare, an interview with Gautam Mukunda and Gianpiero Petriglieri / by Adi Ignatius and Sarah Green Carmichael.
Organizations require certain qualities and behaviors from their employees, so much so that many individuals feel they lose who they truly are. Leaders, especially, can struggle to be seen as authority figures when they feel uncertain or emotional. Can you ever really be yourself at work? This book shows you how to balance vulnerability, emotion, and authority, so that you can feel effective at work while also being true to yourself. You'll learn from the latest research who is most at risk for feeling inauthentic, what that means for engagement and credibility, and how to decide when is appropriate to just be yourself--or adapt to your company's culture and expectations.-- Provided by publisher
Business Library
Book
xxxiii, 494 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Business Library
Book
xxi, 451 pages ; 26 cm
  • Figures xiiiTables xvPreface xviiPart I Static Portfolio Choice and Asset Pricing1 Choice under Uncertainty 31.1 Expected Utility 31.1.1 Sketch of von Neumann-Morgenstern Theory 41.2 Risk Aversion 51.2.1 Jensen's Inequality and Risk Aversion 51.2.2 Comparing Risk Aversion 71.2.3 The Arrow-Pratt Approximation 91.3 Tractable Utility Functions 101.4 Critiques of Expected Utility Theory 121.4.1 Allais Paradox 121.4.2 Rabin Critique 131.4.3 First-Order Risk Aversion and Prospect Theory 141.5 Comparing Risks 151.5.1 Comparing Risks with the Same Mean 161.5.2 Comparing Risks with Different Means 181.5.3 The Principle of Diversification 191.6 Solution and Further Problems 202 Static Portfolio Choice 232.1 Choosing Risk Exposure 232.1.1 The Principle of Participation 232.1.2 A Small Reward for Risk 242.1.3 The CARA-Normal Case 252.1.4 The CRRA-Lognormal Case 272.1.5 The Growth-Optimal Portfolio 302.2 Combining Risky Assets 302.2.1 Two Risky Assets 312.2.2 One Risky and One Safe Asset 332.2.3 N Risky Assets 342.2.4 The Global Minimum-Variance Portfolio 352.2.5 The Mutual Fund Theorem 392.2.6 One Riskless Asset and N Risky Assets 392.2.7 Practical Difficulties 422.3 Solutions and Further Problems 433 Static Equilibrium Asset Pricing 473.1 The Capital Asset PricingModel (CAPM) 473.1.1 Asset Pricing Implications of the Sharpe-Lintner CAPM 483.1.2 The Black CAPM 503.1.3 Beta Pricing and Portfolio Choice 513.1.4 The Black-Litterman Model 543.2 Arbitrage Pricing and Multifactor Models 553.2.1 Arbitrage Pricing in a Single-Factor Model 553.2.2 Multifactor Models 593.2.3 The Conditional CAPM as a Multifactor Model 603.3 Empirical Evidence 613.3.1 Test Methodology 613.3.2 The CAPM and the Cross-Section of Stock Returns 663.3.3 Alternative Responses to the Evidence 723.4 Solution and Further Problems 774 The Stochastic Discount Factor 834.1 Complete Markets 834.1.1 The SDF in a Complete Market 834.1.2 The Riskless Asset and Risk-Neutral Probabilities 844.1.3 Utility Maximization and the SDF 854.1.4 The Growth-Optimal Portfolio and the SDF 854.1.5 Solving Portfolio Choice Problems 864.1.6 Perfect Risksharing 874.1.7 Existence of a Representative Agent 884.1.8 Heterogeneous Beliefs 894.2 Incomplete Markets 904.2.1 Constructing an SDF in the Payoff Space 904.2.2 Existence of a Positive SDF 924.3 Properties of the SDF 934.3.1 Risk Premia and the SDF 934.3.2 Volatility Bounds 954.3.3 Entropy Bound 1004.3.4 Factor Structure 1024.3.5 Time-Series Properties 1024.4 Generalized Method of Moments 1034.4.1 Asymptotic Theory 1044.4.2 Important GMM Estimators 1054.4.3 Traditional Tests in the GMM Framework 1074.4.4 GMM in Practice 1094.5 Limits of Arbitrage 1124.6 Solutions and Further Problems 114Part II Intertemporal Portfolio Choice and Asset Pricing5 Present Value Relations 1215.1 Market Efficiency 1215.1.1 Tests of Autocorrelation in Stock Returns 1245.1.2 Empirical Evidence on Autocorrelation in Stock Returns 1255.2 Present Value Models with Constant Discount Rates 1275.2.1 Dividend-Based Models 1275.2.2 Earnings-Based Models 1315.2.3 Rational Bubbles 1325.3 Present Value Models with Time-Varying Discount Rates 1345.3.1 The Campbell-Shiller Approximation 1345.3.2 Short-and Long-Term Return Predictability 1375.3.3 Interpreting US Stock Market History 1405.3.4 VAR Analysis of Returns 1435.4 Predictive Return Regressions 1445.4.1 Stambaugh Bias 1455.4.2 Recent Responses Using Financial Theory 1465.4.3 Other Predictors 1485.5 Drifting Steady-State Models 1505.5.1 Volatility and Valuation 1505.5.2 Drifting Steady-State Valuation Model 1515.5.3 Inflation and the Fed Model 1535.6 Present Value Logic and the Cross-Section of Stock Returns 1535.6.1 Quality as a Risk Factor 1545.6.2 Cross-Sectional Measures of the Equity Premium 1545.7 Solution and Further Problems 1566 Consumption-Based Asset Pricing 1616.1 Lognormal Consumption with Power Utility 1626.2 Three Puzzles 1636.2.1 Responses to the Puzzles 1666.3 Beyond Lognormality 1686.3.1 Time-Varying Disaster Risk 1736.4 Epstein-Zin Preferences 1766.4.1 Deriving the SDF for Epstein-Zin Preferences 1786.5 Long-Run Risk Models 1826.5.1 Predictable Consumption Growth 1826.5.2 Heteroskedastic Consumption 1846.5.3 Empirical Specification 1866.6 Ambiguity Aversion 1876.7 Habit Formation 1916.7.1 A Ratio Model of Habit 1926.7.2 The Campbell-Cochrane Model 1936.7.3 Alternative Models of Time-Varying Risk Aversion 1986.8 Durable Goods 1996.9 Solutions and Further Problems 2017 Production-Based Asset Pricing 2077.1 Physical Investment with Adjustment Costs 2077.1.1 A q-Theory Model of Investment 2087.1.2 Investment Returns 2127.1.3 Explaining Firms' Betas 2147.2 General Equilibrium with Production 2157.2.1 Long-Run Consumption Risk in General Equilibrium 2157.2.2 Variable Labor Supply 2207.2.3 Habit Formation in General Equilibrium 2227.3 Marginal Rate of Transformation and the SDF 2227.4 Solution and Further Problem 2268 Fixed-Income Securities 2298.1 Basic Concepts 2308.1.1 Yields and Holding-Period Returns 2308.1.2 Forward Rates 2348.1.3 Coupon Bonds 2368.2 The Expectations Hypothesis of the Term Structure 2378.2.1 Restrictions on Interest Rate Dynamics 2388.2.2 Empirical Evidence 2398.3 Affine Term Structure Models 2418.3.1 Completely Affine Homoskedastic Single-Factor Model 2428.3.2 Completely Affine Heteroskedastic Single-Factor Model 2458.3.3 Essentially Affine Models 2468.3.4 Strong Restrictions and Hidden Factors 2498.4 Bond Pricing and the Dynamics of Consumption Growth and Inflation 2508.4.1 Real Bonds and Consumption Dynamics 2508.4.2 Permanent and Transitory Shocks to Marginal Utility 2528.4.3 Real Bonds, Nominal Bonds, and Inflation 2548.5 Interest Rates and Exchange Rates 2578.5.1 Interest Parity and the Carry Trade 2588.5.2 The Domestic and Foreign SDF 2608.6 Solution and Further Problems 2649 Intertemporal Risk 2699.1 Myopic Portfolio Choice 2709.2 Intertemporal Hedging 2729.2.1 A Simple Example 2729.2.2 Hedging Interest Rates 2739.2.3 Hedging Risk Premia 2779.2.4 Alternative Approaches 2839.3 The Intertemporal CAPM 2839.3.1 A Two-Beta Model 2839.3.2 Hedging Volatility: A Three-Beta Model 2879.4 The Term Structure of Risky Assets 2909.4.1 Stylized Facts 2909.4.2 Asset Pricing Theory and the Risky Term Structure 2919.5 Learning 2959.6 Solutions and Further Problems 299Part III Heterogeneous Investors10 Household Finance 30710.1 Labor Income and Portfolio Choice 30810.1.1 Static Portfolio Choice Models 30810.1.2 Multiperiod Portfolio Choice Models 31210.1.3 Labor Income and Asset Pricing 31610.2 Limited Participation 31810.2.1 Wealth, Participation, and Risktaking 31810.2.2 Asset Pricing Implications of Limited Participation 32210.3 Underdiversification 32310.3.1 Empirical Evidence 32410.3.2 Effects on the Wealth Distribution 32710.3.3 Asset Pricing Implications of Underdiversification 32910.4 Responses to Changing Market Conditions 33110.5 Policy Responses 33410.6 Solutions and Further Problems 33511 Risksharing and Speculation 34111.1 Incomplete Markets 34211.1.1 Asset Pricing with Uninsurable Income Risk 34211.1.2 Market Design with Incomplete Markets 34511.1.3 General Equilibrium with Imperfect Risksharing 34611.2 Private Information 34711.3 Default 34911.3.1 Punishment by Exclusion 34911.3.2 Punishment by Seizure of Collateral 35311.4 Heterogeneous Beliefs 35411.4.1 Noise Traders 35411.4.2 The Harrison-Kreps Model 35611.4.3 Endogenou Margin Requirements 35911.5 Solution and Further Problems 36312 Asymmetric Information and Liquidity 37112.1 Rational Expectations Equilibrium 37212.1.1 Fully Revealing Equilibrium 37212.1.2 Partially Revealing Equilibrium 37512.1.3 News, Trading Volume, and Returns 37812.1.4 Equilibrium with Costly Information 38012.1.5 Higher-Order Expectations 38312.2 Market Microstructure 38412.2.1 Information and the Bid-Ask Spread 38512.2.2 Information and Market Impact 38912.2.3 Diminishing Returns in Active Asset Management 39212.3 Liquidity and Asset Pricing 39212.3.1 Constant Trading Costs and Asset Prices 39312.3.2 Random Trading Costs and Asset Prices 39512.3.3 Margins and Asset Prices 39612.3.4 Margins and Trading Costs 39712.4 Solution and Further Problems 400References 405Index 435.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691160801 20171017
From the field's leading authority, the most authoritative and comprehensive advanced-level textbook on asset pricing Financial Decisions and Markets is a graduate-level textbook that provides a broad overview of the field of asset pricing. John Campbell, one of the field's most respected authorities, introduces students to leading theories of portfolio choice, their implications for asset prices, and empirical patterns of risk and return in financial markets. Campbell emphasizes the interplay of theory and evidence, as theorists respond to empirical puzzles by developing models with new testable implications. Increasingly these models make predictions not only about asset prices but also about investors' financial positions, and they often draw on insights from behavioral economics. After a careful introduction to single-period models, Campbell develops multiperiod models with time-varying discount rates, reviews the leading approaches to consumption-based asset pricing, and integrates the study of equities and fixed-income securities. He discusses models with heterogeneous agents who use financial markets to share their risks, but also may speculate against one another on the basis of different beliefs or private information. Campbell takes a broad view of the field, linking asset pricing to related areas, including financial econometrics, household finance, and macroeconomics. The textbook works in discrete time throughout, and does not require stochastic calculus. Problems are provided at the end of each chapter to challenge students to develop their understanding of the main issues in financial economics. The most comprehensive and balanced textbook on asset pricing available, Financial Decisions and Marketswill be an essential resource for all graduate students in finance and related fields. * Integrated treatment of asset pricing theory and empirical evidence* Emphasis on investors' decisions* Broad view linking the field to areas including financial econometrics, household finance, and macroeconomics* Topics treated in discrete time, with no requirement for stochastic calculus* Solutions manual for problems available to professors.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691160801 20171017
Business Library
Journal/Periodical
volumes : illustrations ; 28 cm
Business Library
Book
xi, 202 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
  • Customer loyalty is overrated / by A.G. Lafley and Roger L. Martin
  • Noise: how to overcome the high, hidden cost of inconsistent decision making / by Daniel Kahneman, Andrew M. Rosenfield, Linnea Gandhi, and Tom Blaser
  • Visualizations that really work / by Scott Berinato
  • Right tech, wrong time / by Ron Adner and Rahul Kapoor
  • How to pay for health care / by Michael E. Porter and Robert S. Kaplan
  • The performance management revolution / by Peter Cappelli and Anna Tavis
  • Let your workers rebel / by Francesca Gino
  • Why diversity programs fail / by Frank Dobbin and Alexandra Kalev
  • What so many people don't get about the U.S. working class / by Joan C. Williams
  • The truth about Blockchain / by Marco Iansiti and Karim R. Lakhani
  • The Edison of medicine / by Steven Prokesch.
We've combed through the ideas, insights, and best practices from the past year of Harvard Business Review to help you get up to speed fast on the relevant ideas driving business today. Discover new ideas and sample the work from our vast cabinet of experts and their smart management thinking. Revisit these topics now to make sure you're incorporating the brightest, most up-to-date practices in your organization, or keep it as a reference to access these memorable pieces when you need them most. The collection includes articles on leadership, strategy, and innovation, as well as content to help you manage yourself and others. A year's worth of management wisdom, all in one place.
Business Library
Book
viii, 138 pages ; 18 cm.
  • Understand the four components of influence: where emotions fit in / Nick Morgan
  • Harnessing the science of persuasion: back to behavioral basics / Robert Cialdini
  • Three things managers should be doing every day: build trust, a team, and a network / Annie McKee
  • Learning charisma: captivate and motivate / John Antonakis, Marika Fenley, and Sue Liechti
  • To win people over, speak to their wants and needs: know
  • and empathize with
  • your audience / Nancy Duarte
  • Storytelling that moves people: unite an idea with an emotion, an interview with Robert McKee / by Bronwyn Fryer
  • The surprising persuasiveness of a sticky note: build personal connections / Kevin Hogan
  • When to sell with facts and figures and when to appeal to emotions: head versus heart / Michael D. Harris.
A carefully curated selection of articles about persuasion and influence from Harvard Business Review.Highly curated collections of HBR articlesThe science behind popular conceptsPractical how-to's for approaching difficult work situationsUplifting, affirming essays about human emotionAudience: Aspiring leaders and professionals who feel like their advice and opinion is undervalued or ignored.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781633693937 20171227
Business Library
Book
399 pages ; 24 cm
  • The idea of responsible partisanship, 1945-1952
  • Democrats and the politics of principle, 1952-1960
  • A choice, not an echo, 1945-1964
  • Power in movement, 1961-1968
  • The age of party reform, 1968-1975
  • The making of a vanguard party, 1969-1980
  • Liberal alliance-building for lean times, 1972-1980
  • Dawn of a new party period, 1980-2000
  • Conclusion polarization without responsibility, 2000-2016.
Even in this most partisan and dysfunctional of eras, we can all agree on one thing: Washington is broken. Politicians take increasingly inflexible and extreme positions, leading to gridlock, partisan warfare, and the sense that our seats of government are nothing but cesspools of hypocrisy, childishness, and waste. The shocking reality, though, is that modern polarization was a deliberate project carried out by Democratic and Republican activists. In The Polarizers, Sam Rosenfeld details why bipartisanship was seen as a problem in the postwar period and how polarization was then cast as the solution. Republicans and Democrats feared that they were becoming too similar, and that a mushy consensus imperiled their agendas and even American democracy itself. Thus began a deliberate move to match ideology with party label with the toxic results we now endure. Rosenfeld reveals the specific politicians, intellectuals, and operatives who worked together to heighten partisan discord, showing that our system today is not (solely) a product of gradual structural shifts but of deliberate actions motivated by specific agendas. Rosenfeld reveals that the story of Washington's transformation is both significantly institutional and driven by grassroots influences on both the left and the right.The Polarizers brilliantly challenges and overturns our conventional narrative about partisanship, but perhaps most importantly, it points us toward a new consensus: if we deliberately created today's dysfunctional environment, we can deliberately change it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226407258 20180115
Business Library
Business Library

11. Ad age. [2017 - ]

Journal/Periodical
volumes : illustrations ; 34 cm
Business Library
Book
1 online resource Digital: text file.
  • Introduction
  • The hustle
  • Building a company
  • Airbnb nation
  • The bad and the ugly
  • Air rage
  • Hospitality, disrupted
  • Learning to lead
  • What's next?
Business Library
Book
xx 236 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • The hustle
  • Building a company
  • Airbnb nation
  • The bad and the ugly
  • Air rage
  • Hospitality, disrupted
  • Learning to lead
  • What's next?
A thorough and objective profile of this groundbreaking and unusual company covers its founders, meteoric rise, nagging troubles, and global popularity.
Business Library
Book
1 online resource Digital: text file.
Business Library
Sound recording
1 sound file : digital Digital: audio file.
Business Library

16. AVCJ [2017 - ]

Journal/Periodical
volumes : illustrations ; 30 cm
Business Library
Sound recording
1 sound file : digital Digital: audio file.
Overdrive Access limited to one user.
Business Library
Book
xix, 384 pages ; 25 cm
  • Corporate becoming and strategic leadership
  • HP's history of becoming, 1939-2016 : an integral process overview
  • Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard build a great test and measurement instruments company
  • John Young doubles down on computing
  • Lew Platt pivots HP toward commodity business
  • Carly Fiorina drives HP toward scale and scope
  • Mark Hurd relentlessly manages for results
  • Léo Apotheker intends to revolutionize HP
  • Meg Whitman resolves strategic integration challenges, from better together to splitting HP in two
  • Corporate becoming : why strategic leadership matters.
Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard invented the model of the Silicon Valley start-up and set in motion a process of corporate becoming that made it possible for HP to transform itself six times over the 77 years since its founding in the face of sweeping technological changes that felled most of its competitors over the years. Today, HP is in the throes of a seventh transformation to secure its continued survival by splitting in two independent companies: HP Inc. and Hewlett Packard Enterprise. Based on extensive primary research conducted over more than 15 years, this book documents the differential contribution of HP's successive CEOs in sustaining the company's integral process of becoming. It uses a comprehensive strategic leadership framework to examine and explain the role of the CEO: (1) defining and executing the key tasks of strategic leadership, and (2) developing four key elements of the company's strategic leadership capability. The study of the strategic leadership of HP's successive CEOs revealed the paradox of corporate becoming, the existential situation facing successive CEOs (that justifies the book's empathic approach), and the importance of the CEO's ability to harness the company's past while also driving its future. Building on these novel insights, the book shows how the frameworks used to conceptualize the tasks of strategic leadership and the development of strategic leadership capability can serve as steps toward a dynamic theory of strategic leadership that animates an evolutionary framework of corporate becoming. This framework will be helpful for further theory development about strategic leadership and also offers practical tools for founders of new companies and CEOs and boards of directors of existing companies who intend to create, run or oversee companies built for continued relevance, longevity and greatness.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190640446 20170907
Business Library
Book
xv, 432 pages : acolor illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Acknowledgments vii About the Authors ix Introduction xi Part I A Strong Foundation Chapter 1 Data Visualization: A Primer 2 Part II The Scenarios Chapter 2 Course Metrics Dashboard 38 Chapter 3 Comparing Individual Performance with Peers 48 Chapter 4 What-If Analysis: Wage Increase Ramifications 62 Chapter 5 Executive Sales Dashboard 70 Chapter 6 Ranking by Now, Comparing with Then 80 Chapter 7 Are We on Pace to Reach Our Goals? 92 Chapter 8 Multiple Key Performance Metrics 98 Chapter 9 Power Plant Operations Monitoring 106 Chapter 10 Showing Year-to-Date and Year-over-Year at the Same Time 118 Chapter 11 Premier League Player Performance Metrics 130 Chapter 12 RBS 6 Nations Championship Match Performance Analysis 138 Chapter 13 Web Analytics 146 Chapter 14 Patient History Analysis of Recent Hospital Admissions 156Chapter 15 Hospitality Dashboard for Hotel Management 164 Chapter 16 Sentiment Analysis: Showing Overall Distribution 174 Chapter 17 Showing Sentiment with Net Promoter Score 186 Chapter 18 Server Process Monitoring 202 Chapter 19 Big Mac Index 210 Chapter 20 Complaints Dashboard 224 Chapter 21 Hospital Operating Room Utilization 236 Chapter 22 Showing Rank and Magnitude 246 Chapter 23 Measuring Claims across Multiple Measures and Dimensions 258 Chapter 24 Showing Churn or Turnover 268 Chapter 25 Showing Actual versus Potential Utilization 282 Chapter 26 Health Care Provider Productivity Monitoring 294 Chapter 27 Telecom Operator Executive Dashboard 306 Chapter 28 Economy at a Glance 316 Chapter 29 Call Center 328 Part III Succeeding in the Real World Chapter 30 Want to Engage People? Make Your Dashboards Personal 338 Chapter 31 Visualizing Time 352 Chapter 32 Beware the Dead-End Dashboard 382 Chapter 33 The Allure of Red and Green 390 Chapter 34 The Allure of Pies and Donuts 396 Chapter 35 Clouds and Bubbles 404 Chapter 36 A Journey into the Unknown 410 Glossary 419 Bibliography 423 Index 425.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119282716 20170515
The definitive reference book with real-world solutions you won't find anywhere else The Big Book of Dashboards presents a comprehensive reference for those tasked with building or overseeing the development of business dashboards. Comprising dozens of examples that address different industries and departments (healthcare, transportation, finance, human resources, marketing, customer service, sports, etc.) and different platforms (print, desktop, tablet, smartphone, and conference room display) The Big Book of Dashboards is the only book that matches great dashboards with real-world business scenarios. By organizing the book based on these scenarios and offering practical and effective visualization examples, The Big Book of Dashboards will be the trusted resource that you open when you need to build an effective business dashboard. In addition to the scenarios there's an entire section of the book that is devoted to addressing many practical and psychological factors you will encounter in your work. It's great to have theory and evidenced-based research at your disposal, but what will you do when somebody asks you to make your dashboard 'cooler' by adding packed bubbles and donut charts? The expert authors have a combined 30-plus years of hands-on experience helping people in hundreds of organizations build effective visualizations. They have fought many 'best practices' battles and having endured bring an uncommon empathy to help you, the reader of this book, survive and thrive in the data visualization world. A well-designed dashboard can point out risks, opportunities, and more; but common challenges and misconceptions can make your dashboard useless at best, and misleading at worst. The Big Book of Dashboards gives you the tools, guidance, and models you need to produce great dashboards that inform, enlighten, and engage.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119282716 20170515
Business Library
Book
v, 55 pages ; 17 cm.
Business Library