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Book
231 pages : chiefly illustrated (some color) ; 29 cm
Latin American and Latino artists have used photography to engage with modern media landscapes and critique globalized economies since the 1960s. But rarely are these artists considered leaders in discussions about the theory and scholarship of photography or included in conversations about the radical transformations of photography in the digital era. The Matter of Photography in the Americas presents the work of more than eighty artists working in Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America, South America, and Latino communities in the United States who all have played key roles in transforming the medium and critiquing its uses. Artists like Alfredo Jaar, Oscar Munoz, Ana Mendieta, and Teresa Margolles highlight photography's ability to move beyond the impulse simply to document the world at large. Instead, their work questions the relationship between representation and visibility. With nearly 200 full-color images, this book brings together drawings, prints, installations, photocopies, and three-dimensional objects in an investigation and critique of the development and artistic function of photography. Essays on key works and artists shed new light on the ways photographs are made and consumed. Pressing at the boundaries of what defines culturally specific, photography-centric artwork, this book looks at how artists from across the Americas work with and through photography as a critical tool.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781503605428 20180326
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
xi, 163 pages : illustrations (come color) ; 27 cm
  • Racialized social spaces in casta and costumbrista painting
  • Traveler-artists' visions of Mexico
  • Literary costumbrismo : celebration and satire of los tipos populares
  • Local perspectives : Mexican costumbrista artists
  • Costumbrista photography.
"Focuses on costumbrismo, a cultural trend in Latin America and Spain toward representing local customs, types, and scenes of everyday life in the visual arts and literature, to examine the shifting terms of Mexican identity in the nineteenth century"--Provided by publisher.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
xi, 191 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), color map ; 22 x 29 cm
  • Foreword, by Katherine C. Luber Foreword, by Maria Cristina Garcia Cepeda Preface, by Diego Prieto Preface, by Lidia Camacho Camacho Introduction by Marion Oettinger Jr. ESSAYS ONE - Time and Space on the Missionary Frontier: Cultural Dynamics and the Defense of Northern New Spain by Katherine McAllen TWO - At Empire's Edge: Spanish Colonial San Antonio (1718-1821) by Gerald E. Poyo THREE - Politics, Society, and Art in the Age of Bourbon Reform: Placing the Portrait in Eighteenth-Century New Spain by Ray Hernandez-Duran FOUR - In the Footsteps of Sor Maria de Jesus and Fray Margil de Jesus: A Guadalupan Atlas by Jaime Cuadriello FIVE - A Second Golden Age: The Franciscan Mission in Late Colonial Mexico by Cristina Cruz Gonzalez Essay Notes CATALOGUE People and Places Cycle of Life The Church Catalogue Notes.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781595348340 20180403
Three hundred years ago San Antonio was founded as a strategic outpost of presidios and missions on the edge of northern New Spain, imposing Spanish political and religious principles on this contested, often hostile region. The city's many Catholic missions bear architectural witness to the time of their founding, but few have walked these sites without wondering who once lived there and what they saw, valued, and thought. San Antonio 1718 presents a wealth of art that depicts a rich blending of sometimes conflicted cultures -- explorers, colonialists, and indigenous Native Americans -- and places the city's founding in context. The book is organized into three sections, accompanied by five discussions by internationally recognized scholars with expertise in key aspects of eighteenth-century northern New Spain. The first section, "People and Places, " features art depicting the lives of ordinary people. Such art is rare since most painting and sculpture from this period was made in service to the church, the crown, or wealthy families. They provide compelling insight into how those living in the Spanish Colonies viewed gender, social organization, ethnicity, occupation, dress, home and workplace furnishings, and architecture. Since portraiture was the most popular genre of eighteenth-century and early nineteenth-century Mexican painting, the second section, "Cycle of Life, " includes a selection of individual and family portraits representing people during different stages of life. The third and largest section is devoted to the church. Throughout the colonial period, Catholic evangelization of New Spain went hand in hand with military, economic, and political expansion. All the major religious orders-the Franciscans, the Dominicans, the Jesuits, and the Augustinians-played significant roles in proselytizing indigenous populations of northern New Spain, establishing monasteries and convents to support these efforts. In San Antonio 1718, more than 100 portraits, landscapes, religious paintings, and devotional and secular objects reveal the visual culture that reflected and supported this region's evolving world view, signaling how New Spain saw itself, its vast colonial and religious ambitions, in an age prior to the emergence of an independent Mexico and, subsequently, the state of Texas.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781595348340 20180403
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
xix, 174 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm.
  • A historiography of colonial art in Mexico: Problems, context, and developments
  • Locating a colonial past in the nation's memory: The politics of making history
  • The Academy of San Carlos and the Old Mexican School: Collecting and displaying colonial painting
  • Writing a history of art in Mexico: From spectacular verses to rational texts
  • Concluding remarks: Contested ground.
The first substantial Mexican colonial art historiography in English, this book examines the origin of the study of colonial art in Mexico as a symptom of the development of modern museum practice in mid-nineteenth-century Mexico City. Also an intellectual history, this study recognizes the role of nationalism in the initiation of art historical practice in what is understood today more broadly as Latin America. Although there has been a steady stream of scholarship produced about the subject, beginning in Mexico and increasingly in the United States, what is variably known as viceregal or colonial Mexican, Spanish colonial, and colonial Latin American art continues to be underplayed or overlooked by most art historians and is thus marginal in the field of art history. Ray Hernández-Durán redresses that omission, presenting a detailed examination of the origin of the study of colonial art in Mexico. Drawing upon archival research, this volume touches upon the role of politics on the formation of the first gallery of Mexican painting in the Academy of San Carlos and the first comprehensive historical treatment of the material in the form of a dialogue. Furthermore, this study promotes further research in colonial art historiography and underlines the pivotal role that the Indo-Hispanic Americas played in the emergence of early modernity and the process of globalization.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
201 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 32 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
191 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), color maps ; 25 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
xix, 324 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 27 cm.
  • Part I: New York's Museum of Modern Art
  • The Rivera retrospective
  • Part II: Rockefeller Center
  • The art program and the Rivera mural commission
  • Producing a mural, removing it from view
  • Destruction of the mural
  • Part III: Mexico City's Palace of Fine Arts
  • Commissioning the mural, painting it anew.
Collaborations during the Great Depression between the Mexican artist and Communist activist Diego Rivera and institutions in the United States and Mexico were fraught with risk, as the artist occasionally deviated from course, serving and then subverting his patrons. Catha Paquette investigates controversies surrounding Rivera's retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, his Rockefeller Center mural Man at the Crossroads, and the Mexican government's commissioning of its reconstruction at the Palace of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She proposes that both the artist and his patrons were using art for extraordinary purposes, leveraging clarity and ambiguity to weigh in on debates concerning labor policies and speech rights; relations between the United States, Mexico, and the Soviet Union; and the viability of capitalism, communism, and socialism. Rivera and his patrons' shared interest in images of labor-a targeted audience-made cooperative ventures possible. In recounting Rivera's shifts in strategy from collaboration/exploitation to antagonism/conflict, Paquette highlights the extent to which the artist was responding to politico-economic developments and facilitating alignment/realignment among leftist groups for and against Stalin. Although the artwork that resulted from these instances of patronage had the potential to serve conflicting purposes, Rivera's images and the protests that followed the destruction of the Rockefeller Center mural were integral to a surge in oppositional expression that effected significant policy changes in the United States and Mexico.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781477311004 20170306
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
xvii, 184 pages : illustrations (some color), maps, plans ; 21 cm
  • Borderwalls as public space / Teddy Cruz
  • Introduction / Ronald Rael
  • Pilgrims at the wall / Marcello Di Cintio
  • Borderwall as architecture: the divided states of North america / Ronald Rael
  • Transborderisms: practices that tear down walls / Norma Iglesias-Prieto
  • Recuerdos/souvenirs: a nuevo grand tour / Ronald Rael
  • Why walls don't work / Michael Dear
  • Afterwards / Ronald Rael.
Borderwall as Architecture is an artistic and intellectual hand grenade of a book, and a timely re-examination of what the physical barrier that divides the United States of America from the United Mexican States is and could be. It is both a protest against the wall and a projection about its future. Through a series of propositions suggesting that the nearly seven hundred miles of wall is an opportunity for economic and social development along the border that encourages its conceptual and physical dismantling, the book takes readers on a journey along a wall that cuts through a "third nation"-the Divided States of America. On the way the transformative effects of the wall on people, animals, and the natural and built landscape are exposed and interrogated through the story of people who, on both sides of the border, transform the wall, challenging its existence in remarkably creative ways. Coupled with these real-life accounts are counterproposals for the wall, created by Rael's studio, that reimagine, hyperbolize, or question the wall and its construction, cost, performance, and meaning. Rael proposes that despite the intended use of the wall, which is to keep people out and away, the wall is instead an attractor, engaging both sides in a common dialogue. Included is a collection of reflections on the wall and its consequences by leading experts Michael Dear, Norma Iglesias-Prieto, Marcello Di Cintio, and Teddy Cruz.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520283947 20170522
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
327 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 28 cm
Following the U.S.-Mexican War (1846-1848), lands that had for centuries belonged to New Spain, and later to Mexico, were transformed into the thirty-first state in the United States. This process was facilitated by visual artists, who forged distinct pictorial motifs and symbols to establish the state's new identity. This collective cultural inheritance of the Spanish and Mexican periods forms a central current of California history but has been only sparingly studied by cultural and art historians. California Mexicana focuses for the first time on the range and vitality of artistic traditions growing out of the unique amalgam of Mexican and American culture that evolved in Southern California from 1820 through 1930. A study of these early regional manifestations provides the essential matrix out of which emerge later art and cultural issues. Featuring painters, printmakers, photographers, and mapmakers from both sides of the border, this collection demonstrates how they made the Mexican presence visible in their art. This beautifully illustrated catalogue addresses two key areas of inquiry: how Mexico became California, and how the visual arts reflected the shifting identity that grew out of that transformation. Published in association with the Laguna Art Museum, and as part of the Getty's Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA. Exhibition dates: Laguna Art Museum: October 15, 2017-January 14, 2018.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520296367 20171218
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
316 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
358 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), maps (some color) ; 32 cm
The histories of Mexico and the United States have been intertwined since the 18th century, when both were colonies of European empires. America's fascination with Mexican culture emerged in the 19th century and continues to this day. In turn, Mexico looked to the U.S. as a model of modernity, its highways and high-rises emblematic of "The American Way of Life." Exploring the design movements that defined both places during the 20th century, this book is arranged into four sections- Spanish Colonial inspiration, Pre-Hispanic Revivals, Folk Art and Craft Traditions, and Modernism. Featured are essays by leading scholars and illustrations of more than 300 works by architects and designers including Richard Neutra, Luis Barraga n, Charles and Ray Eames, and Clara Porset. The word translation originally meant "to bring or carry across." The constant migration between California and Mexico has produced cultures of great richness and complexity, while the transfers of people and materials that began with centuries-old trade routes continue to resonate in modern society, creating synergies that are "found in translation."00Exhibition: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, USA (17.09.2017-01.04.2018).
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
173 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 28 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
3 volumes : illustrations (some color) ; 28 cm + 1 folded map (26 x 34 cm folded to 26 x 17 cm) with overlaid transparency
  • Vol. 1. Licenciado verdad.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
157 pages : illustrations (some color), color map ; 34 cm
  • Ruins in reverse : Josef Albers In Mexico / Lauren Hinkson
  • Devouring squares : Josef Albers in the center of the pyramid / Joaqún Barriendos
  • Truthfulness in art / Josef Albers
  • Map : on journeys
  • Plates : Monte Albán ; Mitla ; Teotihuacán ; Tenayuca ; Uxmal ; Oaxaca ; Chichén Itzá.
On his first trip to Mexico, in 1935, Josef Albers (1888-1976) encountered the magnificent architecture of ancient Mesoamerica. He later remarked in a letter to Vasily Kandinsky, a former colleague at the Bauhaus, "Mexico is truly the promised land of abstract art." With his wife, artist Anni Albers (1899- 1994), Josef Albers visited Mexico and other Latin American countries nearly a dozen times from 1935-67. They saw numerous archeological sites and monuments, especially in Mexico and Peru. On each visit, he took hundreds of black-and-white photographs of the pyramids, shrines, and sanctuaries at these sites, often grouping multiple images printed at various scales onto 8 by 10 inch sheets. Albers's experiences in Latin America offer an essential context for understanding his paintings and prints, particularly from his Homage to the Square and Variant/Adobe series, examples of which are featured in this show. Exhibition: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, United States (03.11.2017 - 18.02.2018).
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
299 pages : illustrations (some color), maps ; 22 cm
Joy Ride is a simple book on the surface. A collection of renowned architect-come-artist David C. Martin's sketches, watercolours, photography, and observations, as recorded over an extensive cross-Mexico sojourn, it has all the aesthetic gaiety and light-heartedness of a typical travelogue. However, there is something deeper at work. Martin's multi-media evocation of Mexican scenery and buildings speaks to his extensive experience in art and architecture, and this book will be of mutual interest to students of both - as well as those who want to explore Mexico through the eyes of a truly unique traveller. Innovative, fresh, and evocative, this book will take you on the 'Joy Ride' that its title promises.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781939621733 20170911
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
295 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
x, 214 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Sight and Site on the Line Part I: The Territorial Imagination 1. Framing the Frontier: From Survey to Surveillance 2. Homeland as Home Front: Terror, Territory and Television Part II: Mobile Frontiers 3. Exhibiting the Frontier: Thresholds and Checkpoints as Museological Projects 4. Canada as the Borderline Case: 'Outer America' and the Northern Frontier Part III: Modalities of Dissensus 5. Psychogeography after NAFTA 6. Sites of Dissensus: Aesthetics after the Border 7. Have you left the American Sector? Detroit's Borderama Spectacle.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138842243 20170306
American territorial borders have undergone significant and unparalleled changes in the last decade. They serve as a powerful and emotionally charged locus for American national identity that parallels the historical idea of the frontier. But the concept of the frontier, so central to American identity throughout modern history, has all but disappeared in contemporary representation while the border has served to uncomfortably fill the void left in the spatial imagination of American culture. This book focuses on the shifting relationship between borders and frontiers in North America, specifically the ways in which they have been imaged and imagined since their formation in the nineteenth century and how tropes of visuality are central to their production and meaning. Rodney links ongoing discussions in political geography and visual culture in new ways to demonstrate how contemporary American borders exhibit security as a display strategy that is resisted and undermined through a variety of cultural practices.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138842243 20170306
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)

18. Mexican graphic art [2017]

Book
319 pages : illustrations (some color), maps ; 24 cm
This new book, published to coincide with an exhibition at Kunsthaus Zurich in summer 2017 offers an overview of the development of Mexican graphic art between the late 19th-century and the 1970s, ranging from figurativism to early abstract works. It features around 50 key works on paper, printed using a range of techniques, that deal with issues such as poverty and wealth, love and cruelty, and the poetry and hardships of everyday life. In addition to prints by Jose Guadalupe Posada, there are characteristic Realist works by Leopoldo Mendez, Diego Rivera and David Alfaro Siqueiros as well as abstracts by Rufino Tamayo and Francisco Toledo. Revolutionary ideas and engagement with socio-cultural and socio-political concerns play a key role in the history of Mexican art. The members of Taller de Grafica Popular, a people's graphic art workshop established in 1937 by a collective of international artists in Mexico, produced flyers and posters for the masses supporting trade unions, popular education and socialist issues in the country. Their editions exemplify the typical Mexican tradition of black-and-white woodcuts and linoleum prints. The images depict Mexican life and the customs and characteristics of its indigenous populations, but also include the country's first forays into abstract art. The images are complemented by an introductory essay and brief texts on the artists and featured works. The Mexican Graphic Art exhibition runs from 19 May to 27 August 2017, Kunsthaus Zurich.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783858817990 20180129
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
358 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 30 cm
  • Art before the Mexican Revolution
  • Mexico and the Revolution
  • Other faces of the Mexican School of Painting
  • The clash of two different worlds.
Mexico 1900-1950 offers an unprecedented survey of Mexican art from the turn of the century through the Revolution (1910-20) and until the early 1950s. It examines key works across different mediums by major Mexican artists, including Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, and Jose Clemente Orozco, as well as by lesser-known figures and women artists. The catalogue showcases Mexican modern art as its own distinct avant-garde, fundamentally different from that of Europe. Although many Mexican artists lived and practiced in Paris during the early decades of the 20th century, they eventually returned home and drew extensively from themes surrounding nationhood and Mexico's rich, mythical past, poignantly articulating their country's revolutionary ideals, traditions, and aspirations. Over 250 illustrations foreground this wholly original and sweeping study of Mexico as a hotbed for modernism and artistic achievement.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300229950 20170821
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
205 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 31 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)