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Book
xi, 476 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 497 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 504 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 482 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 455 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxii, 484 p. ; 20 cm.
Complete integrated indices of History of Middle-earth volumes to complement new series. For the first time every index from each of the twelve volumes of The History Of Middle-earth has been published together in a single volume -- to create a supreme index charting the writing of Tolkien's masterpieces The Lord of The Rings and The Silmarillion. This stunning work of reference complements the fascinating History of Middle-earth series, now repackaged to complement the distinctive and classic style of the 'black cover' A-format paperbacks of The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, The Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780007137435 20160528
Green Library

7. The fall of Arthur [2013]

Book
233 pages ; 23 cm
  • Foreword
  • The fall of Arthur
  • Notes on the text of The fall of Arthur
  • The poem in Arthurian tradition
  • The unwritten poem and its relation to The Silmarillion
  • The evolution of the poem
  • Appendix: Old English verse.
The world first publication of a previously unknown work by J.R.R. Tolkien, which tells the extraordinary story of the final days of England's legendary hero, King Arthur. The Fall of Arthur, the only venture by J.R.R. Tolkien into the legends of Arthur King of Britain, may well be regarded as his finest and most skilful achievement in the use of the Old English alliterative metre, in which he brought to his transforming perceptions of the old narratives a pervasive sense of the grave and fateful nature of all that is told: of Arthur's expedition overseas into distant heathen lands, of Guinevere's flight from Camelot, of the great sea-battle on Arthur's return to Britain, in the portrait of the traitor Mordred, in the tormented doubts of Lancelot in his French castle. Unhappily, The Fall of Arthur was one of several long narrative poems that he abandoned in that period. In this case he evidently began it in the earlier nineteen-thirties, and it was sufficiently advanced for him to send it to a very perceptive friend who read it with great enthusiasm at the end of 1934 and urgently pressed him 'You simply must finish it!' But in vain: he abandoned it, at some date unknown, though there is some evidence that it may have been in 1937, the year of the publication of The Hobbit and the first stirrings of The Lord of the Rings. Years later, in a letter of 1955, he said that 'he hoped to finish a long poem on The Fall of Arthur'; but that day never came. Associated with the text of the poem, however, are many manuscript pages: a great quantity of drafting and experimentation in verse, in which the strange evolution of the poem's structure is revealed, together with narrative synopses and very significant if tantalising notes. In these latter can be discerned clear if mysterious associations of the Arthurian conclusion with The Silmarillion, and the bitter ending of the love of Lancelot and Guinevere, which was never written.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780007489947 20160612
Green Library

8. Beren and Lúthien [2017]

Book
288 pages, 9 unnumbered leaves of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 23 cm
Painstakingly restored from Tolkien's manuscripts and presented for the first time as a continuous and standalone story, the epic tale of Beren and Luthien will reunite fans of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings with Elves and Men, Dwarves and Orcs and the rich landscape and creatures unique to Tolkien's Middle-earth.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780008214197 20170807
Green Library

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