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Book
xiii, 232 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Wes Jackson can teach us many things about the land, soil, and conservation, but what most resonates is this: The ecosphere is self-regulating, and as often as we attempt to understand it, we are not its builders, and our manuals will often be faulty. The only responsible way to learn the nuances of the land is to study the soil and vegetation in their natural state and pass this knowledge on to future generations. In Nature as Measure, a collection of Jackson's essays from Altars of Unhewn Stone and Becoming Native to This Place, these ideas of land conservation and education are written from the point of view of a man who has practiced what he's preached and proven that it is possible to partially restore much of the land that we've ravaged. Wes Jackson lays the foundation for a new farming economy, grounded in nature's principles and located in dying small towns and rural communities. Exploding the tenets of industrial agriculture, Jackson seeks to integrate food production with nature in a way that sustains both.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781582437002 20160607
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 272 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
  • Some history and assumptions. Introduction
  • One man's education
  • Earth is alive
  • The 3.45-billion-year-old imperative and the five pools
  • The rise of technological fundamentalism
  • Losses. The most serious loss of all
  • Chemicals on the landscape
  • The loss of cultural capacity
  • Global warming : how a little change can mean a lot
  • Reversing the damage. Consulting the genius
  • A 50-year farm bill proposal goes to Washington
  • An appeal to the Russians
  • Were ants the first agriculturists?
  • Analyzing the resistance. Analyzing the resistance
  • Away from the extractive economy. Away from the extractive economy
  • An enigma. Thoughts on the natural history of Eden.
Locavore leaders such as Alice Waters, Michael Pollan, and Barbara Kingsolver all speak of the need for sweeping changes in how we get our food. Also a longtime leader of this movement is Wes Jackson, who, for decades, has taken it upon himself to speak for the grasses and the land of the prairie, to speak for the soil itself. Here, he offers a manifesto toward a conceptual revolution: Jackson asks us to look to natural ecosystems -- or, if one prefers, nature in general -- as the measure against which we judge all of our agricultural practices. Wes Jackson believes the time is right to do away with monocultures, which are vulnerable to national security threats and are partly responsible for the explosion in our healthcare costs. Soil erosion, overgrazing, and the poisons polluting our water and air -- all associated with our contemporary form of American agriculture -- foretell a population with its physical health and land destroyed. In this eloquent and timely call to arms, Jackson asks us to look to nature itself to lead us out of the mess we've made. We do this by consulting with the natural ecosystems that will tell us, if we listen, what should happen to the future of food.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781582435138 20160605
Locavore leaders such as Alice Waters, Michael Pollan, and Barbara Kingsolver all speak of the need for sweeping changes in how we get our food. A longtime leader of this movement is Wes Jackson, who for decades has taken it upon himself to speak for the land, to speak for the soil itself. Here, he offers a manifesto toward a conceptual revolution: Jackson asks us to look to natural ecosystems--or, if one prefers, nature in general--as the measure against which we judge all of our agricultural practices. Jackson believes the time is right to do away with annual monoculture grains, which are vulnerable to national security threats and are partly responsible for the explosion in our healthcare costs. Soil erosion and the poisons polluting our water and air--all associated with agriculture from its beginnings--foretell a population with its natural fertility greatly destroyed. In this eloquent and timely volume, Jackson argues we must look to nature itself to lead us out of the mess we've made. The natural ecosystems will tell us, if we listen, what should happen to the future of food.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781582437804 20160605
Green Library
Book
xvi, 250 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
354 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Toward an ignorance-based worldview / Wes Jackson
  • The way of ignorance / Wendell Berry
  • Ignorance, an inner perspective / Robert Perry
  • Human ignorance and the limited use of history / Richard D. Lamm
  • Ignorance and know-how / Conn Nugent
  • Optimizing uncertainty / Raymond H. Dean
  • Toward an ecological conversation / Steve Talbott
  • Ignorance and ethics / Anna L. Peterson
  • Imposed ignorance and humble ignorance: two worldviews / Paul G. Heltne
  • Battle for the soul of ignorance: rhetoric and philosophy in classical Athens / Charles Marsh
  • Choosing ignorance within a learning universe / Peter G. Brown
  • The path of enlightened ignorance: Alfred North Whitehead and Ernst Mayr / Strachan Donnelley
  • Joyful ignorance and the civic mind / Bill Vitek
  • I don't know / Robert Root-Bernstein
  • Lessons learned from ignorance: the curriculum on medical (and other) ignorance / Marlys Hearst Witte ... [et al.]
  • Economics and the promotion of ignorance-squared / Herb Thompson
  • Educating for ignorance / Jon Jensen
  • Climate change and the limits of knowledge / Joe Marocco
  • Can we see with fresh eyes? beyond a culture of abstraction / Craig Holdrege.
As our dependence on technology has increased precipitously over the past centuries, so too has the notion that we can solve all environmental problems with scientific explanations. "The Virtues of Ignorance: Complexity, Sustainability, and the Limits of Knowledge" proposes an alternative to this dangerous worldview. The contributing authors argue that our reliance on scientific knowledge has created many of the problems that now plague the globe and that our wholesale dependence on scientific progress is both untenable and myopic. They conclude that we must simply accept that our ignorance far exceeds our knowledge and always will.Bill Vitek and Wes Jackson and a diverse group of thinkers, including Wendell Berry, Anna Peterson, and Robert Root-Bernstein, offer insights on the advantages of an ignorance-based worldview. Their essays explore the entire realm of this philosophy, from its origins and its essence to how its implementation can preserve vital natural resources for future generations. "The Virtues of Ignorance" argues that knowledge-based worldviews are more dangerous than useful and looks ahead to determine how humans can live sustainably on Earth.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813124773 20160528
Green Library

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