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Book
4 volumes ; 26 cm
  • Book I. Of the rights of persons
  • Book II. Of the rights of things
  • Book III. Of private wrongs
  • Book IV. Of public wrongs.
Oxford's variorum edition of William Blackstone's seminal treatise on the common law of England and Wales offers the definitive account of the Commentaries' development in a modern format. For the first time it is possible to trace the evolution of English law and Blackstone's thought through the eight editions of Blackstone's lifetime, and the authorial corrections of the posthumous ninth edition. Introductions by the general editor and the volume editors set the Commentaries in their historical context, examining Blackstone's distinctive view of the common law, and editorial notes throughout the four volumes assist the modern reader in understanding this key text in the Anglo-American common law tradition. Book I: Of the Rights of People Volume Editor: David Lemmings Book II: Of the Rights of Things Volume Editor: Simon Stern Book III: Of Private Wrongs Volume Editor: Thomas P. Gallanis Book IV: Of Public Wrongs Volume Editor: Ruth Paley.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199601035 20161024
Oxford's variorum edition of William Blackstone's seminal treatise on the common law of England and Wales offers the definitive account of the Commentaries' development in a modern format. For the first time it is possible to trace the evolution of English law and Blackstone's thought through the eight editions of Blackstone's lifetime, and the authorial corrections of the posthumous ninth edition. Introductions by the general editor and the volume editors set the Commentaries in their historical context, examining Blackstone's distinctive view of the common law, and editorial notes throughout the four volumes assist the modern reader in understanding this key text in the Anglo-American common law tradition. Book I: Of the Rights of Persons covers the key topics of constitutional and public law. Blackstone's inaugural lecture 'On the Study of the Law' introduces a series of general essays on the nature of law, including a chapter on 'The Absolute Rights of Individuals' . This is followed by an extended account of England's political constitution. The various categories of people or subjects are then surveyed, with special attention to the rights and obligations of masters and servants, husbands and wives, parents and children, and lastly 'artificial persons', or corporations. In addition to David Lemmings' introduction to the volume, Book I includes an introduction from the General Editor Wilfrid Prest.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199600991 20161024
Oxford's variorum edition of William Blackstone's seminal treatise on the common law of England and Wales offers the definitive account of the Commentaries' development in a modern format. For the first time it is possible to trace the evolution of English law and Blackstone's thought through the eight editions of Blackstone's lifetime, and the authorial corrections of the posthumous ninth edition. Introductions by the general editor and the volume editors set the Commentaries in their historical context, examining Blackstone's distinctive view of the common law, and editorial notes throughout the four volumes assist the modern reader in understanding this key text in the Anglo-American common law tradition. Entitled Of Private Wrongs, Book III can be divided into three principal parts. The first describes the multiple courts in England and their jurisdictions, including the wrongs cognizable in each of them. The second describes some aspects of the substantive common law: wrongs to persons and to personal and real property. The third describes the processes of litigation in the courts of common law and equity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199601011 20161024
Oxford's variorum edition of William Blackstone's seminal treatise on the common law of England and Wales offers the definitive account of the Commentaries' development in a modern format. For the first time it is possible to trace the evolution of English law and Blackstone's thought through the eight editions of Blackstone's lifetime, and the authorial corrections of the posthumous ninth edition. Introductions by the general editor and the volume editors set the Commentaries in their historical context, examining Blackstone's distinctive view of the common law, and editorial notes throughout the four volumes assist the modern reader in understanding this key text in the Anglo-American common law tradition. In the final volume of the Commentaries Blackstone presents a comprehensive and critical overview of English criminal law and procedure, prefaced by a discussion of the philosophical and basis of the criminal justice system. His final chapter 'On the Rise, Progress, and Gradual Improvements, of the Laws of England' provides a fitting historical conclusion to the work as a whole.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199601028 20161024
Oxford's variorum edition of William Blackstone's seminal treatise on the common law of England and Wales offers the definitive account of the Commentaries' development in a modern format. For the first time it is possible to trace the evolution of English law and Blackstone's thought through the eight editions of Blackstone's lifetime, and the authorial corrections of the posthumous ninth edition. Introductions by the general editor and the volume editors set the Commentaries in their historical context, examining Blackstone's distinctive view of the common law, and editorial notes throughout the four volumes assist the modern reader in understanding this key text in the Anglo-American common law tradition. Property law is the subject of Book II, the second and longest volume of Blackstone's Commentaries. His lucid exposition covers feudalism and its history, real estate and the forms of tenure that a land-owner may have, and personal property, including the new kinds of intangible property that were developing in Blackstone's era, such as negotiable instruments and intellectual property.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199601004 20161024
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xviii, 479 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Book the first : Of the rights of persons
  • Book the second : Of the rights of things
  • Book the third : Of private wrongs
  • Book the fourth : Of public wrongs.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxxiv, 208 p. : ill., col. port. ; 26 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xx, 1148 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
4 v. ; 24 cm.
  • Book I: Of the Rights of Persons (1765)-- Book II: Of the Rights of Things (1766)-- Book III: Of Private Wrongs (1768)-- Book IV: Of Public Wrongs (1769).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226055473 20160528
Sir William Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England (1765-69) stands as the first effort to consolidate English common law into a unified and rational system. Clearly and elegantly written, the work achieved immediate renown and exerted a powerful influence on legal education both in England and America. This handsomely produced, slipcased four-volume set is a facsimile of the eighteenth-century first edition, undistorted by later interpolations. The Commentaries is divided into four books. The first, introduced by Stanley N. Katz, deals with what Blackstone called "the rights of persons, " what a modern lawyer would call constitutional law, the legal structure of government. Book II includes an introduction by A. W. Brian Simpson and describes the law of property. Book III, introduced by John H. Langbein, analyzes civil procedure and remedies. The last book, which is devoted to criminal law and procedure, includes an introduction by Thomas A. Green. Now regarded as a literary, as well as legal, classic, Blackstone's Commentaries brilliantly laid out the system of English law in the mid-eighteenth century, demonstrating that as a system of justice, it was comparable to Roman law and the civil law of the Continent. Ironically, the work also revealed to the colonists the insufficiencies of the system and became a model for the developing legal system of the American nation in 1789. Supplemented with commentary by experts in the field, these classic facsimile volumes belong in every lawyer's library.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226055473 20160528
www.heinonline.org for assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
4 v. : ports. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
4 v. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Original version For assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
iv, 119, xii, 155 p. 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
lv, 254 p. port. 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
4 v. : 2 tab. (1 fold.) ; 28 cm.
www.heinonline.org for assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
987 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
18 p. : port. ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xx, 1040 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
[8] p.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
[4] p. ; 26 cm.
galenet.galegroup.com for assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
4 v. in 2 : port. ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
536 p.
www.llmcdigital.org for assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
2 v. (cxxiii, 2770 p.) : port. ; 23 cm.
galenet.galegroup.com for assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
2 v. : port.
www.llmcdigital.org LLMC Digital For assistance please ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxi, 1148 p. ; 22 cm.
www.llmcdigital.org for assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)