Search results

RSS feed for this result

11 results

Book
xiii, 166 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Urban resilience : cities of fear and hope
  • Climate change and peak oil : the double whammy for resource-intensive cities
  • Four scenarios for the future of cities : collapse, ruralized, divided, or resilient city
  • A vision for resilient cities : the built environment
  • Hope for resilient cities : transport
  • Conclusion : ten strategic steps toward a resilient city.
This is a visionary guide to developing cities that are livable, sustainable, and 'resilient'. Half of the world's inhabitants now live in cities. In the next twenty years, the number of urban dwellers will swell to an estimated five billion people. With their inefficient transportation systems and poorly designed buildings, many cities - especially in the United States - consume enormous quantities of fossil fuels and emit high levels of greenhouse gases. But our planet is rapidly running out of the carbon-based fuels that have powered urban growth for centuries and we seem to be unable to curb our greenhouse gas emissions. Are the world's cities headed for inevitable collapse?The authors of this spirited book don't believe that oblivion is necessarily the destiny of urban areas. Instead, they believe that intelligent planning and visionary leadership can help cities meet the impending crises, and look to existing initiatives in cities around the world. Rather than responding with fear (as a legion of doomsaying prognosticators have done), they choose hope.First, they confront the problems, describing where we stand today in our use of oil and our contribution to climate change. They then present four possible outcomes for cities: 'collapse, ' 'ruralized, ' 'divided, ' and 'resilient.' In response to their scenarios, they articulate how a new 'sustainable urbanism' could replace today's 'carbon-consuming urbanism.' They address in detail how new transportation systems and buildings can be feasibly developed to replace our present low-efficiency systems. In conclusion, they offer ten 'strategic steps' that any city can take toward greater sustainability and resilience.This is not a book filled with 'blue sky' theory (although blue skies will be a welcome result of its recommendations). Rather, it is packed with practical ideas, some of which are already working in cities today. It frankly admits that our cities have problems that will worsen if they are not addressed, but it suggests that these problems are solvable. And the time to begin solving them is now.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781597264990 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 166 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Urban resilience : cities of fear and hope
  • Climate change and peak oil : the double whammy for resource-intensive cities
  • Four scenarios for the future of cities : collapse, ruralized, divided, or resilient city
  • A vision for resilient cities : the built environment
  • Hope for resilient cities : transport
  • Conclusion: Ten strategic steps toward a resilient city.
This is a visionary guide to developing cities that are livable, sustainable, and 'resilient'. Half of the world's inhabitants now live in cities. In the next twenty years, the number of urban dwellers will swell to an estimated five billion people. With their inefficient transportation systems and poorly designed buildings, many cities - especially in the United States - consume enormous quantities of fossil fuels and emit high levels of greenhouse gases. But our planet is rapidly running out of the carbon-based fuels that have powered urban growth for centuries and we seem to be unable to curb our greenhouse gas emissions. Are the world's cities headed for inevitable collapse?The authors of this spirited book don't believe that oblivion is necessarily the destiny of urban areas. Instead, they believe that intelligent planning and visionary leadership can help cities meet the impending crises, and look to existing initiatives in cities around the world. Rather than responding with fear (as a legion of doomsaying prognosticators have done), they choose hope.First, they confront the problems, describing where we stand today in our use of oil and our contribution to climate change. They then present four possible outcomes for cities: 'collapse, ' 'ruralized, ' 'divided, ' and 'resilient.' In response to their scenarios, they articulate how a new 'sustainable urbanism' could replace today's 'carbon-consuming urbanism.' They address in detail how new transportation systems and buildings can be feasibly developed to replace our present low-efficiency systems. In conclusion, they offer ten 'strategic steps' that any city can take toward greater sustainability and resilience.This is not a book filled with 'blue sky' theory (although blue skies will be a welcome result of its recommendations). Rather, it is packed with practical ideas, some of which are already working in cities today. It frankly admits that our cities have problems that will worsen if they are not addressed, but it suggests that these problems are solvable. And the time to begin solving them is now.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781597264990 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xx, 289 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
What if, even in the heart of a densely developed city, people could have meaningful encounters with nature? While parks, street trees, and green roofs are increasingly appreciated for their technical services like storm water reduction, from a biophilic viewpoint, they also facilitate experiences that contribute to better physical and mental health: natural elements in play areas can lessen children's symptoms of ADHD and adults who exercise in natural spaces can experience greater reductions in anxiety and blood pressure. The Handbook of Biophilic City Planning & Design offers practical advice and inspiration for ensuring nature in the city is more than infrastructure, that it also creates an emotional connection to the earth and promotes well-being among urban residents. Divided into six parts, the Handbook begins by introducing key ideas, literature, and theory about biophilic urbanism; followed by chapters that highlight urban biophilic innovations in more than a dozen global cities; the final part concludes with lessons on how to advance an agenda for urban biophilia and an extensive list of resources.As the most comprehensive reference on the emerging field of biophilic urbanism, the Handbook is essential reading for students and practitioners looking to place nature at the core of their planning and design ideas and encourage what pre-eminent biologist E. O. Wilson described as "the innate emotional connection of humans to all living things.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781610916202 20170123
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
x, 264 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction : a different land, similar challenges
  • Greening and sustaining cities
  • New and hopeful perspectives on ecological assets
  • Strengthening place, building community
  • Bush cities: Australia's urban ecological capitals
  • The importance of regional and state planning
  • Learning from Australia: some final thoughts on the value of comparative green urbanism.
This book offers a uniquely practical look at how 'green' solutions in Australia can benefit U.S. cities. In this immensely practical book, Timothy Beatley sets out to answer a simple question: what can Americans learn from Australians about 'greening' city life? "Green Urbanism Down Under" reports on the current state of 'sustainability practice' in Australia and the many lessons that U.S. residents can learn from the best Australian programs and initiatives.Australia is similar to the United States in many ways, especially in its 'energy footprint.' For example, Australia's per capita greenhouse gas emissions are second only to those of the United States. A similar percentage of its residents live in cities (85 percent in Australia vs. 80 percent in the United States). And it suffers from parallel problems of air and water pollution, a national dependence on automobiles, and high fossil fuel consumption. Still, after traveling throughout Australia, Beatley finds that there are myriad creative responses to these problems - and that they offer instructive examples for the United States."Green Urbanism Down Under" is a very readable collection of solutions. Although many of these innovative solutions are little-known outside Australia, they all present practical possibilities for U.S. cities. Beatley describes 'green transport' projects, 'city farms, ' renewable energy plans, green living programs, and much more. He considers a host of public policy initiatives and scrutinizes regional and state planning efforts for answers. In closing, he shares his impressions about how Australian results might be applied to U.S. problems.This is a unique book: hopeful, constructive, and filled with ideas that have been proven to work. It is a 'must read' for anyone who cares about the future of American cities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781597264112 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xvi, 181 p. : ill., map.
  • Introduction : climate change and coastal resilience
  • Coastal resilience : what is it?
  • The vulnerability of coastal communities
  • Coastal resilience : key planning dimensions
  • Barriers to coastal resilience
  • Understanding the political setting and context
  • Principles of coastal resilience
  • Tools and techniques for enhancing and strengthening coastal resilience
  • Worcester County, Maryland
  • Cannon Beach and the Northwest Oregon Coast
  • Palm Beach County, Florida
  • Charleston County, South Carolina
  • New Orleans, Louisiana, and resilience after Katrina
  • Brief coastal resilience profiles : La Plata, Maryland : rebuilding after a devastating tornado ; The villages at Loreto Bay, Baja California Sur : a model of a new, resilient, and sustainable coastal town ; Kinston, North Carolina : sustainable redevelopment and green infrastructure ; Solara : solar-powered affordable housing in San Diego County, California ; Maui County, Hawaii : resilient island paradise ; Noisette, North Charleston, South Carolina : large-scale coastal redevelopment with resilience and sustainability at the core
  • Conclusion : the promise of coastal resilience.
Why and how coastal regions should prepare for climatic catastrophes. Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency and magnitude of coastal storms around the globe, and the anticipated rise of sea levels will have enormous impact on fragile and vulnerable coastal regions. In "Planning for Coastal Resilience", Tim Beatley argues that, in the face of such threats, all future coastal planning and management must reflect a commitment to the concept of resilience. In this timely book, he writes that coastal resilience must become the primary design and planning principle to guide all future development and all future infrastructure decisions. Resilience, Beatley explains, is a profoundly new way of viewing coastal infrastructure - an approach that values smaller, decentralized kinds of energy, water, and transport more suited to the serious physical conditions coastal communities will likely face. Implicit in the notion is an emphasis on taking steps to build adaptive capacity, to be ready ahead of a crisis or disaster. It is anticipatory, conscious, and intentional in its outlook. After defining and explaining coastal resilience, Beatley focuses on what it means in practice. Resilience goes beyond reactive steps to prevent or handle a disaster. It takes a holistic approach to what makes a community resilient, including such factors as social capital and sense of place. Beatley provides case studies of five U.S. coastal communities, and 'resilience profiles' of six North American communities, to suggest best practices and to propose guidelines for increasing resilience in threatened communities. The work described in this book was commissioned and supported by the Coastal Services Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Headquartered in Charleston, South Carolina, its mission is to foster and sustain the environmental and economic well-being of the nation's coasts by linking people, information, and technology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781597265621 20160612
Book
xvi, 181 p. : ill., map ; 23 cm
  • Introduction : climate change and coastal resilience
  • Coastal resilience : what is it?
  • The vulnerability of coastal communities
  • Coastal resilience : key planning dimensions
  • Barriers to coastal resilience
  • Understanding the political setting and context
  • Principles of coastal resilience
  • Tools and techniques for enhancing and strengthening coastal resilience
  • Worcester County, Maryland
  • Cannon Beach and the Northwest Oregon Coast
  • Palm Beach County, Florida
  • Charleston County, South Carolina
  • New Orleans, Louisiana, and resilience after Katrina
  • Brief coastal resilience profiles : La Plata, Maryland : rebuilding after a devastating tornado ; The villages at Loreto Bay, Baja California Sur : a model of a new, resilient, and sustainable coastal town ; Kinston, North Carolina : sustainable redevelopment and green infrastructure ; Solara : solar-powered affordable housing in San Diego County, California ; Maui County, Hawaii : resilient island paradise ; Noisette, North Charleston, South Carolina : large-scale coastal redevelopment with resilience and sustainability at the core
  • Conclusion : the promise of coastal resilience.
Why and how coastal regions should prepare for climatic catastrophes. Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency and magnitude of coastal storms around the globe, and the anticipated rise of sea levels will have enormous impact on fragile and vulnerable coastal regions. In "Planning for Coastal Resilience", Tim Beatley argues that, in the face of such threats, all future coastal planning and management must reflect a commitment to the concept of resilience. In this timely book, he writes that coastal resilience must become the primary design and planning principle to guide all future development and all future infrastructure decisions. Resilience, Beatley explains, is a profoundly new way of viewing coastal infrastructure - an approach that values smaller, decentralized kinds of energy, water, and transport more suited to the serious physical conditions coastal communities will likely face. Implicit in the notion is an emphasis on taking steps to build adaptive capacity, to be ready ahead of a crisis or disaster. It is anticipatory, conscious, and intentional in its outlook. After defining and explaining coastal resilience, Beatley focuses on what it means in practice. Resilience goes beyond reactive steps to prevent or handle a disaster. It takes a holistic approach to what makes a community resilient, including such factors as social capital and sense of place. Beatley provides case studies of five U.S. coastal communities, and 'resilience profiles' of six North American communities, to suggest best practices and to propose guidelines for increasing resilience in threatened communities. The work described in this book was commissioned and supported by the Coastal Services Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Headquartered in Charleston, South Carolina, its mission is to foster and sustain the environmental and economic well-being of the nation's coasts by linking people, information, and technology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781597265621 20160612
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvi, 191 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Tim Beatley has long been a leading advocate for the 'greening' of cities. But too often, he notes, urban greening efforts focus on everything except nature, emphasising such elements as public transport, renewable energy production, and energy efficient building systems. While these are important aspects of re-imagining urban living, they are not enough, says Beatley. We must remember that human beings have an innate need to connect with the natural world (the biophilia hypothesis). And any vision of a sustainable urban future must place its focus squarely on nature, on the presence, conservation, and celebration of the actual green features and natural life forms. A biophilic city is more than simply a biodiverse city, says Beatley. It is a place that learns from nature and emulates natural systems, incorporates natural forms and images into its buildings and cityscapes, and designs and plans in conjunction with nature. A biophilic city cherishes the natural features that already exist but also works to restore and repair what has been lost or degraded. In "Biophilic Cities Beatley" not only outlines the essential elements of a biophilic city, but provides examples and stories about cities that have successfully integrated biophilic elements - from the building to the regional level - around the world. From urban ecological networks and connected systems of urban green space, to green rooftops and green walls and sidewalk gardens, Beatley reviews the emerging practice of biophilic urban design and planning, and tells many compelling stories of individuals and groups working hard to transform cities from grey and lifeless to green and biodiverse.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781597267144 20160605
dx.doi.org SpringerLink
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xv, 491 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Land use and urban form - planning compact cities-- housing and living environments-- green transport and mobility studies-- taming the auto - the promise of car-free cities?-- bicycles - low-tech ecological mobility-- cities like forests - urban ecology and strategies for greening the urban environment-- urban eco-cycling balancing-- renewable energy cities-- building ecologically-- ecological governance in green urban cities-- building a sustainable economy-- the promises of green urbanisms.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781559636827 20160528
The author explains what planners and local officials can learn from the sustainable city movement in Europe. The book draws from extensive European experience, examining progress and policies in innovative cities including Vienna, Helsinki, Stockholm, London, Amsterdam and Berlin.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781559636827 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
viii, 234 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
"Green Cities of Europe" draws on the world's best examples of sustainability to show how other cities can become greener and more livable. Timothy Beatley has brought together leading experts from Paris, Freiburg, Copenhagen, Helsinki, Heidelberg, Venice, Vitoria-Gasteiz, and London to illustrate groundbreaking practices in urban planning. These cities are creating greenways, improving public transit, conserving energy, instituting "green audits" for government, and strengthening their city centres. With "Green Cities of Europe", Beatley offers the planning community not only a vision of holistic sustainability, but a clear guide to accomplishing it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781597269759 20160614
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xiii, 348 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Part I: Origins of the Sustainability Concept 1. Ebenezer Howard, 1898 "The Three Magnets" from Garden Cities of To-morrow 2. Lewis Mumford, 1938 "Cities and the Crisis of Civilization" from The Culture of Cities 3. Aldo Leopold, 1949 "The Land Ethic" from A Sand County Almanac 4. Jane Jacobs, 1961 "Orthodox Planning and The North End" from The Death and Life of Great American Cities 5. Ian L. McHarg, 1969 "Plight and Prospect" from Design With Nature 6. Andre Gunder Frank, 1967 "The Development of Underdevelopment" from Capitalism and Underdevelopment in Latin America 7. Donella Meadows et al., 1972 "Perspectives, Problems, and Models" from The Limits to Growth 8. Herman Daly, 1973 "The Steady-State Economy" from Toward a Steady-State Economy 9. World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987 "Towards Sustainable Development" from Our Common Future 10. United Nations, 1992, 1996 "The Rio Declaration on Environment and Development" and Introduction to Chapter 7 from Agenda 21 (United Nations Conference on Environment and Development) and "The Istanbul Declaration on Human Settlements" from the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements Part II: Dimensions of Urban Sustainability Land Use and Urban Design 11. Peter Calthorpe, 1993 "The Next American Metropolis" from The Next American Metropolis: Ecology, Community, and the American Dream 12. Jan Gehl, 1980 "Outdoor Space and Outdoor Activities" from Life Between Buildings Transportation: 13. Robert Cervero, 1998 "Transit and the Metropolis: Finding Harmony" from The Transit Metropolis: A Global Inquiry 14. Peter Newman and Jeffrey Kenworthy, 1999 "Traffic Calming" from Sustainability and Cities: Overcoming Automobile Dependence 15. John Pucher, Charles Komanoff and Paul Shimek, 1999 "Bicycling Renaissance in North America?" Transportation Research A 213 Urban Ecology and Restoration: 16. Ann Whiston Spirn, 1984 "City and Nature" from The Granite Garden: Urban Nature and Human Design 17. Tim Beatley, 1994 "Land Development and Endangered Species: Emerging Conflicts" from Habitat Conservation Planning 18. Ann Riley, 1997 "What Is Restoration?" from Restoring Streams in Cities Energy and Materials Use: 19. Herbert Girardet, 1999 "The Metabolism of Cities" from Creating Sustainable Cities 20. John Tillman Lyle, 1994 "Waste as a Resource" from Regenerative Design for Sustainable Development Environmental Justice and Social Equity: 21. Robert Bullard, 1990 "People-of-Color Environmentalism" from Dumping in Dixie: Race, Class, and Environmental Quality (Third Edition) 22. Dolores Hayden, 1984 "Domesticating Urban Space" from Redesigning the American Dream: The Future of Housing, Work, and Family Life Economic Development: 23. David Pearce and Edward B. Barbier, .
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415311861 20160527
The Sustainable Urban Development Reader brings together classic readings from a wide variety of sources to investigate how our cities and towns can become more sustainable. Thirty-eight selections span issues such as land use planning, urban design, transportation, ecological restoration, economic development, resource use and equity planning. Section introductions outline the major themes, whilst the editors' introductions to the individual writings explain their interest and significance to wider debates. Additional sections present twenty-four case studies of real-world sustainable urban planning examples, sustainability planning exercises, and further reading. Providing background in theory, practical application, and vision, in a clear, accessible format, The Sustainable Urban Development Reader is an essential resource for students, professionals, and indeed anyone interested in the future of urban environments. Edward B. Barbier.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415311861 20160527
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
1 online resource.
"Green Cities of Europe" draws on the world's best examples of sustainability to show how other cities can become greener and more livable. Timothy Beatley has brought together leading experts from Paris, Freiburg, Copenhagen, Helsinki, Heidelberg, Venice, Vitoria-Gasteiz, and London to illustrate groundbreaking practices in urban planning. These cities are creating greenways, improving public transit, conserving energy, instituting "green audits" for government, and strengthening their city centres. With "Green Cities of Europe", Beatley offers the planning community not only a vision of holistic sustainability, but a clear guide to accomplishing it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781597269759 20160614
dx.doi.org SpringerLink

Looking for different results?

Modify your search: Remove limit(s) Search all fields

Search elsewhere: Search WorldCat Search library website