Book
1 online resource (313 pages) : illustrations (some color), maps, graphs.
Book
48 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 v. (various pagination) : ill. ; 28 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 92 p. ; 28 cm.
At the Conference on Environmentally & Socially Sustainable Development sponsored by the World Bank's Learning and Leadership Center and UNESCO, participants discussed developing nations seeking technology transfer, undertaking new partnerships with the private sector, and pursuing the development of their own scientific and technical capacities. As they do, the quality and content of academic endeavors and research agendas become critical in organizing and investing in knowledge. This volume is a compilation of the topics raised at the conference, which was assembled to pursue the important task of organizing knowledge that can help address key issues facing people around the world. Issues in the book concern survival of the species and the environment and the well-being of the world's children.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780821342503 20160617
Book
114 p.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
216 p.
Green Library
Book
xviii, 205 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 26 cm.
  • The Indian context and enabling environment
  • Creating and commercializing knowledge
  • Diffusing and absorbing knowledge
  • Promoting inclusive innovation
  • Strengthening skills and education for innovation
  • Upgrading information infrastructure
  • Enhancing innovation finance.
Green Library
Book
xv, 270 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
xvi, 221 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
This book is the latest report by the World Bank to estimate comprehensive wealth - including produced, natural and human / institutional assets - for over 100 countries. This ground-breaking report presents wealth accounts for 1995, 2000, and 2005, permitting the first longer-term assessment of global, regional, and country performance in building wealth. This overall assessment is complemented by chapters detailing individual components of wealth, as well as how countries and the World Bank are using comprehensive measures of wealth for policy analysis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780821384886 20160605
Book
xvi, 221 p. : ill ; 23 cm.
This book is the latest report by the World Bank to estimate comprehensive wealth - including produced, natural and human / institutional assets - for over 100 countries. This ground-breaking report presents wealth accounts for 1995, 2000, and 2005, permitting the first longer-term assessment of global, regional, and country performance in building wealth. This overall assessment is complemented by chapters detailing individual components of wealth, as well as how countries and the World Bank are using comprehensive measures of wealth for policy analysis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780821384886 20160605
Business Library
Book
1 online resource (242 pages) : illustrations.
This book is the latest report by the World Bank to estimate comprehensive wealth - including produced, natural and human / institutional assets - for over 100 countries. This ground-breaking report presents wealth accounts for 1995, 2000, and 2005, permitting the first longer-term assessment of global, regional, and country performance in building wealth. This overall assessment is complemented by chapters detailing individual components of wealth, as well as how countries and the World Bank are using comprehensive measures of wealth for policy analysis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780821384886 20160605
Book
xvii, 188 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
As production from capture fisheries stagnates, aquaculture is changing the face of our waters. This book provides guidance on sustainable aquaculture to decision makers in the international development community and in client countries of international finance institutions. The study focuses on several critical issues and challenges: harnessing the contribution of aquaculture to economic development; building environmentally sustainable aquaculture; creating the enabling conditions for sustainable aquaculture; and developing and transferring human and institutional capacity in governance, technologies, and business models, with lessons from Asia to Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780821370155 20160528
Green Library
Book
ix, 61 p. : ill.
  • Rationale for green infrastructure finance framework
  • Economic rationale of green investments
  • Conceptual methodology for assessing and allocating risks
  • Assessment of green investment climate in eap countries
  • Conclusion and next steps
  • Annex 1: Green investment climate matrix
  • Annex 2: Bibliography.
This report builds on the conclusions of the Green Infrastructure Finance: Leading Initiatives and Research report and lays out a simple and elegant way in which scarce public financing can leverage market interest in 'greening' infrastructure, particularly in the East Asia and Pacific Region. The framework introduced in the report bridges ideas and concepts between environmental economics and project finance practices and consists largely of an analytical methodology for determining the financial viability gap of low-emission projects and an approach for assessing and strengthening the green investment climate in a given country environment. The authors argue that the solution to the financing challenge of low-emission investments lies in understanding the causes of a given project's financial viability gap, and then investigating how specific actions, including concessional financing, strategic subsidies and other public policy interventions and reforms, can be deployed in a complementary fashion to close the gap. The approach provides suggestions for appropriately allocating risks and responsibilities to various stakeholders for financing portions of the financial viability gap and recommends using multiple instruments and tools to make green investments viable. Governments, for example, could rebalance their own policy distortions with a mix of domestic instruments such as feed-in tariffs, direct subsidies, domestic carbon taxes, and other financing and fiscal incentives. The international community could contribute international instruments for monetizing the global externality benefits of green investments through concessional financing and direct grants. Such an approach results in hybrid financing structures designed to maximize the leveraging effect of public interventions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780821395271 20160617
Book
p. cm.
  • Rationale for green infrastructure finance framework
  • Economic rationale of green investments
  • Conceptual methodology for assessing and allocating risks
  • Assessment of green investment climate in eap countries
  • Conclusion and next steps
  • Annex 1: Green investment climate matrix
  • Annex 2: Bibliography.
This report builds on the conclusions of the Green Infrastructure Finance: Leading Initiatives and Research report and lays out a simple and elegant way in which scarce public financing can leverage market interest in 'greening' infrastructure, particularly in the East Asia and Pacific Region. The framework introduced in the report bridges ideas and concepts between environmental economics and project finance practices and consists largely of an analytical methodology for determining the financial viability gap of low-emission projects and an approach for assessing and strengthening the green investment climate in a given country environment. The authors argue that the solution to the financing challenge of low-emission investments lies in understanding the causes of a given project's financial viability gap, and then investigating how specific actions, including concessional financing, strategic subsidies and other public policy interventions and reforms, can be deployed in a complementary fashion to close the gap. The approach provides suggestions for appropriately allocating risks and responsibilities to various stakeholders for financing portions of the financial viability gap and recommends using multiple instruments and tools to make green investments viable. Governments, for example, could rebalance their own policy distortions with a mix of domestic instruments such as feed-in tariffs, direct subsidies, domestic carbon taxes, and other financing and fiscal incentives. The international community could contribute international instruments for monetizing the global externality benefits of green investments through concessional financing and direct grants. Such an approach results in hybrid financing structures designed to maximize the leveraging effect of public interventions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780821395271 20160617
Book
xvi, 171 p. : ill ; 27 cm.
  • An analytical framework for green growth
  • Fostering environment-friendly behavioral change through market and non-market mechanisms
  • Innovation and other industrial policies
  • Human capital: implications of green growth policies for labor markets and job creation
  • Natural capital
  • Physical capital: the role of infrastructure in green growth strategies
  • Crafting a green growth strategy.
As the global population heads toward 9 billion by 2050, decisions made today will lock countries into growth patterns that may or may not be sustainable in the future. Care must be taken to ensure that cities and roads, factories and farms are designed, managed, and regulated as efficiently as possible to wisely use natural resources while supporting the robust growth developing countries still need. Economic development during the next two decades cannot mirror the previous two: poverty reduction remains urgent but growth and equity can be pursued without relying on policies and practices that foul the air, water, and land. Inclusive Green Growth: The Pathway to Sustainable Development makes the case that greening growth is necessary, efficient, and affordable. Yet spurring growth without ensuring equity will thwart efforts to reduce poverty and improve access to health, education, and infrastructure services. Countries must make strategic investments and farsighted policy changes that acknowledge natural resource constraints and enable the world's poorest and most vulnerable to benefit from efficient, clean, and resilient growth. Like other forms of capital, natural assets are limited and require accounting, investment, and maintenance in order to be properly harnessed and deployed. By maximizing co-benefits and avoiding lock-in, by promoting smarter decisions in industry and society, and by developing innovative financing tools for green investment, we can afford to do the things we must.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780821395516 20160609
Green Library
Book
xix, 272 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
xix, 345 p. : ill., 1 col. map ; 28 cm.
  • OTO.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
OTO.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
xii, 234 p. : ill., maps (some col.) ; 28 cm.
Green Library
Book
xxvi, 86 p. : ill., 1 col. map ; 28 cm.
Green Library

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