Search results

RSS feed for this result

1,170 results

Book
xii, 453 pages ; 26 cm
  • Homeland security : introduction and historical context
  • Presidential power and congressional authority
  • Habeas corpus and military tribunals
  • Habeas corpus & acess to civilian courts
  • Governmental privilege & immunity
  • Government takings, destruction of private property and emergency authority
  • Regulation of immigration, border security and the right to travel
  • Detention and rendition
  • Free speech and right of association
  • Search, surveillance & interrogation.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 33 pages ; 28 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vii, 38 pages ; 24 cm
Question presented: Whether or under what circumstances the Fifth Amendment's self-incrimination clause protects a defendant's refusal to answer law enforcement questionings before he has been arrested or read his Miranda warnings.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
i, 20 pages ; 24 cm
  • Relevant docket entries
  • Transcript of guilt-innocence proceedings (pretrial hearing on motion in limine), March 11, 2009
  • Transcript of guilt-innocence proceedings (testimony of Sergeant Elliott), March 12, 2009.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
24 pages ; 24 cm
Question presented: Whether or under what circumstances the Fifth Amendment's self-incrimination clause protects a defendant's refusal to answer law enforcement questionings before he has been arrested or read his Miranda warnings.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 39, 15 pages ; 28 cm
Questions presented: 1. Whether the Executive Branch's agreement with the court below that DOMA is unconstitutional deprives this Court of jurisdiction to decide this case. 2. Whether the Bipartisan Legal Advisory Group of the United States House of Representatives has Article III standing in this case.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 39, 15 pages ; 24 cm
Questions presented: 1. Whether the Executive Branch's agreement with the court below that DOMA is unconstitutional deprives this Court of jurisdiction to decide this case. 2. Whether the Bipartisan Legal Advisory Group of the United States House of Representatives has Article III standing in this case.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ii, 9 pages ; 24 cm
"[The] Court should hold that it has jurisdiction to decide whether DOMA violates the Fifth Amendment"-- Page 9.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
viii, 28 pages ; 28 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 23, 48 pages ; 28 cm
Question presented: Does Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act, 1 U.S.C. section 7, which defines the term "marriage" for all purposes under federal law as "only a legal union between one man and one woman as husband and wife, " deprive same-sex couples who are lawfully married under the laws of their states (such as New York) of the equal protection of the laws, as guaranteed by the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 48 pages ; 24 cm
Question presented: Whether a floating structure that is indefinitely moored receives power and other utilities from shore and is not intended to be used in maritime transportation or commerce constitutes a "vessel" under 1 U.S.C. Sec. 3, thus triggering federal maritime jurisdiction.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
106 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 24 cm
Question presented: Whether a floating structure that is indefinitely moored receives power and other utilities from shore and is not intended to be used in maritime transportation or commerce constitutes a "vessel" under 1 U.S.C. Sec. 3, thus triggering federal maritime jurisdiction.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
viii, 32 pages ; 28 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
266 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Corporations as speakers : Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, 130 S. Ct. 876 (2010)
  • Government and its speech forum : Pleasant Grove City v. Summum, 129 S. Ct. 1125 (2009)
  • Expressive conduct unleashed : Hurley v. Irish-American Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Group of Boston, 515 U.S. 557 (1995)
  • Speech out of thin air : Boy Scouts of America v. Dale, 530 U.S. 640 (2000)
  • The secret ballot : voting as speech : Doe v. Reed, 130 S. Ct. 2811 (2010).
Randall P. Bezanson takes up an essential and timely inquiry into the Constitutional limits of the Supreme Court's power to create, interpret, and enforce one of the essential rights of American citizens. Analyzing contemporary Supreme Court decisions from the past fifteen years, Bezanson argues that judicial interpretations have fundamentally and drastically expanded the meaning and understanding of "speech." Bezanson focuses on judgments such as the much-discussed Citizens United case, which granted the full measure of constitutional protection to speech by corporations, and the Doe vs. Reed case in Washington state, which recognized the signing of petitions and voting in elections as acts of free speech. In each case study, he questions whether the meaning of speech has been expanded too far and critically assesses the Supreme Court's methodology in reaching and explaining its expansive conclusions. Randall P. Bezanson is the David H. Vernon Professor of Law at the University of Iowa and the author of Art and Freedom of Speech, How Free Can Religion Be? and How Free Can the Press Be?
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780252037115 20160610
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 440 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • ch. 1. Capital punishment in America
  • pt. I: Foundational cases. ch. 2. Cruel and unusual as applied--Furman v. Georgia (1972)
  • ch. 3. Not inherently unconstitutional--Gregg v. Georgia (1976)
  • ch. 4. Mandatory death penalty--Woodson v. North Carolina (1976)
  • ch. 5. Mitigating evidence--Lockett v. Ohio (1978), Jurek v. Texas (1976)
  • ch. 6. Racial bias--McCleskey v. Kemp (1987)
  • pt. II: Death-eligibile crimes and persons. ch. 7. Rape and other nonhomicide crimes--Coker v. Georgia (1977)
  • ch. 8. Murder--Godfrey v. Georgia (1980)
  • ch. 9. Felony-murder--Enmund v. Florida (1982) and Tison v. Arizona (1987)
  • ch. 10. The mentally retarded and juveniles--Atkins v. Virginia (2002) and Roper v. Simmons (2005)
  • ch. 11. Child rape--Kennedy v. Louisiana (2008)
  • pt. III: The death penalty trial. ch. 12: Appropriate decisionmakers--Spaziano v. Florida (1984) and Ring v. Arizona (2002)
  • ch. 13: Selecting jurors--Witherspoon v. Illinois (1968), Turner v. Murray (1986), Uttecht v. Brown (2007)
  • ch. 14: Victim impact evidence--Payne v. Tennessee (1991)
  • ch. 15: The sentencing decision--McKoy v. North Carolina (1990) and Kansas v. Marsh (2006)
  • pt. IV: Post-conviction review. ch. 16: Ineffective counsel--Strickland v. Washington (1984) and Williams v. Taylor (2000)
  • ch. 17: Claims of innocence--Herrera v. Collins (1993) and Kansas v. Marsh (2006)
  • pt. V: Execution issues. ch. 18: Insane convicts may not be executed--Ford v. Wainwright (1986) and Panetti v. Quarterman (2007)
  • ch. 19: Method of execution--Baze v. Rees (2008)
  • Appendix A: Facts and figures on murder and the death penalty
  • Appendix B: Understanding statutory provisions.
Death Penalty Cases presents significant verbatim excerpts of death-penalty decisions from the United States Supreme Court. The first chapter introduces the topics discussed throughout the book. It also includes a detailed history of the death penalty in the United States. After this introduction, the remaining eighteen chapters are divided into five parts: Foundational Cases, Death-Eligible Crimes and Persons, The Death Penalty Trial, Post-Conviction Review, and Execution Issues. The first part, consisting of five chapters, talks about the mandatory death penalty, mitigating evidence and racial bias. The next part covers death-eligible crimes, such as rape and other crimes that do not involve homicide and murder. The middle part presents the trial process, from choosing the appropriate decision-makers through the sentencing decision. Followed by this is a chapter focusing on the aftermath of conviction, such as claims of innocence. The book concludes by exploring issues related to execution, such as not executing insane convicts. Finally, execution methods are presented. * Provides the most recent case material--no need to supplement. * Topical organization of cases provides a more logical organization for structuring a course. * Co-authors with different perspectives on the death penalty assures complete impartiality of the material. * Provides the necessary historical background, a clear explanation of the current capital case process, and an impartial description of the controversies surrounding the death penalty * Provides the latest statistics relevant to discussions on the death penalty. * Clearly explains the different ways in which the states process death penalty cases, with excerpts of the most relevant statutes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780123820242 20160605
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 35, 4 pages ; 24 cm
These Amici will address the following question: Whether the unanimous holdings of twelve Courts of Appeal, both before and after Employment Division v. Smith, 494 U.S. 872 (1990), that religious institutions have the right to hire, fire, direct, and discipline employees who perform religious functions, without second-guessing by secular authorities, is properly grounded in the First Amendment Religion
Law Library (Crown)