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1. Ripe for change [2006]

Video
1 online resource (1 video file, approximately 56 min.) : digital, .flv file, sound
California -- always a fascinating marriage of opposite extremes -- is at a cross-roads in agriculture. Many Californians are struggling to fend off overdevelopment and the loss of farming lands and traditions while embracing innovative visions of agricultural sustainability. At the same time, California is where fast food was born and a center of the biotechnology industry and large corporate agribusiness. The debates raging in California over issues of food, agriculture, and sustainability have profound implications for all of America, especially in a world where scarcity is the norm and many natural resources are diminishing. This fascinating documentary explores the intersection of food and politics in California over the last 30 years. It illuminates the complex forces struggling for control of the future of California's agriculture, and provides provocative commentary by a wide array of eloquent farmers, prominent chefs, and noted authors and scientists. The film examines a host of thorny questions: What are the trade-offs between the ability to produce large quantities of food versus the health of workers, consumers, and the planet? What are the hidden costs of "inexpensive" food? How do we create sustainable agricultural practices? Through the "window" of food and agriculture, Ripe for Change reveals two parallel yet contrasting views of our world. One holds that large-scale agriculture, genetic engineering, and technology promise a hunger-less future. The other calls for a more organic, sustainable, and locally focused style of farming that reclaims the aesthetic and nurturing qualities of food and considers the impact of agriculture on the environment, on communities, and on workers. Ripe for Change was directed by award-winning filmmaker Emiko Omori. Producers: Emiko Omori and Jed Riffe Director: Emiko Omori.
Book
1 v (various pagings) ; digital, PDF file, ill. (some col.)
Book
[2] p. ; 28 cm.
Green Library
Book
6 p. : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (20 pages) : color illustrations
Book
1 online resource (33 pages) : color illustrations Digital: text file.
Collection
Government Information State and Local Collection
Journal/Periodical
v. ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Journal/Periodical
v. ; 28 cm.
Green Library
Book
2 v. : digital, PDF files.
  • v.1. [38304-01] Report.
  • v.2. [38304-02] Appendixes.
Book
485 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 28 cm
Green Library
Video
1 online resource (1 video file, approximately 100 min.) : digital, .flv file, sound Sound: digital. Digital: video file; MPEG-4; Flash.
The Pritzker-prize winning architect Thom Mayne has been identified with muscular, bold, steel-and-glass design since the founding of his firm, Morphosis, in 1971. With the Federal Office Building in San Francisco, Mayne proves that innovative and sustainable architecture can be introduced successfully into a building type typically considered predictable and boring. In this tour of the dramatic high-rise building, Mayne takes us through its many awe-inspiring spaces, including the main lobby, upper-level offices, and an elevated outdoor bridge. During the compelling visit, the architect's engaging remarks about various green features also provides added insight into the building's inner workings. Producer: Edgar B. Howard. Directors: Tom Piper and Charles Gansa.
Book
v, 154 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Green Library
Book
ii, 270 p. : charts, maps ; 28 cm.
Green Library
Journal/Periodical
volumes : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Green Library

16. Sustainable streets [2015] Online

Book
1 online resource (515 pages in various pagings) : color illustrations Digital: text file.
During the past several years, momentum behind the Complete Streets (or sustainable streets) movement has continued to increase, fueled by a public desire for walkable, bikeable streets with options aside from driving. A national survey released in September 2012 showed that 55% of Americans want to drive less, but 74% say they have no choice [1]. Public sentiment has begun placing greater value on having other options available, whether for commuting, trips to the grocery store, or simply for recreation. While much of San Mateo is safe and convenient, a Sustainable Streets Plan presents an opportunity for the City to formalize a framework that will guide the development of a first-class transportation network that will allow for safe movement by any individual whether by car, on bike or on foot. Streets represent a large portion of the public space, and as such, have the opportunity to have a significant impact on wellness, recreation, ecology, economic development, and interaction with public spaces. This planning effort built upon existing planning efforts such as the Citywide Pedestrian Master Plan and Bicycle Master Plan to ensure that priority networks throughout the City can be implemented, while also ensuring that all streets provide a basic level of access and mobility for pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit users. The city's approach in developing this plan carried one key goal: implementation of sustainable streets in the City of San Mateo for the benefit of our residents present and future.
Video
1 online resource (1 video file, approximately 44 min.) : digital, .flv file, sound Sound: digital. Digital: video file; MPEG-4; Flash.
Scraphouse was a temporary demonstration home, built entirely of salvaged material on Civic Center Plaza adjacent to San Francisco City Hall. Over the course of just six weeks, a team of volunteers scoured Bay Area dumps and scrap yards. A group of architects, landscape architects, lighting specialists, and metal fabricators repurposed the materials, giving them new life. Scraphouse illustrated the possibilities, as well as the challenges, of green building, recycling, and reuse.
Book
1 online resource (v, 88 pages) : color illustrations Digital: text file.
Collection
Government Information State and Local Collection
New economic study shows California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) protects the environment without stunting economic growth. CEQA requires state and local agencies to identify the potentially significant environmental impacts of proposed plans and development projects, and then to avoid or mitigate those impacts when feasible. This report was designed to closely examine the arguments and assumptions underlying the most current calls for changes to the law.
Book
ix, 50 pages : illustrations
Green Library

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